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Full text of "Minutes of the ... annual session of the West Chowan Baptist Association"

WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



3 0399 0819431 7 



WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY 

THE Z. SMITH REYNOLDS LIBRARY 




CALL NO. 




1911-1923 



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MINUTES 




{{ 

Twenty-Ninth Annual Session 

of the 

WEST CHOWAN 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 

held with 

j Winton Baptist Church, Hertford Co., N. C, 
1 October 24th, 25th and 26th, 191 j. 



The next session will be held with Republican Church Bertie Countv 
be.:nnm. on Tuesday after the Fourth Sunday in 0;tohetl912 
T. L. Brown to preach the Introductory Sermon, 
C. L. Dowell, Alternate. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 
Nash Brothers. Printers and Binders 
19 11 



MINUTES 

of the 

Twenty-Ninth Annual Seission 

of the 

WEST CHOWAN 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 

held with 

Winton Baptist Church, Hertford Co., N. C, 

October 24th, 25th and 26th, 1911. 



The next session will be held with Republican Church, Bertie County,- 
beginning on Tuesday after the Fourth Sunday in October, 1912, 
T. L. Brown to preach the Introductory Sermon, 
C. L. Dowell, Alternate. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 
Nash Brothers, Printers and Binders 
19 11 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 



Home Missions^; L. Dow4n'- J S M'^^c'h:^"'^^- ^f'^'"^- 
Ministers' Relief— W P TavInV irr=ni, w-.?- ' ^- Thomas. 
Chowan Coliege-D P Ha?ri, F T r T*^-'"'^"?,"/ J' '«'^'-<'- 
The Orphanage-J A SpeTght T L Brow/' r^v 
Education-J. C. Searbor^oug^ 'a w";- mtZilTT^It^ZlL 



/ LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS 

\Dancy Cale 

L. Dowell Potecasi, N. C. 

> S. B. Barnes Ahoskie, N. C.* 

il*C. W. Scarborough Ahoskie, N. c' 

^T. T. Speight V.' * Woodland, N. C. 

H. T. White Windsor, N. C. 

J. R. Mathews Conway, N. C. 

•iA. T. Howell .*. • • . Aulander, N. c' 

'H. F, Brinson Murfreesboro, N. C. 

i^Q. C. Davis Tunis, N. C. 
5R. L. Gay. Windsor, N. C 
i€. P. Scott .' Aulander, N. C." 
J. P. Cale Murfreesboro, N. C.' 

NIL. A. Parker Roxobel, N. C. 

John Barnes Menola, N. C 

v' W. B. Waff Pendleton, N. C. 

vfB. P. Harris Conway, N. C. 

I J. H. Poteet Winton, N. C 

r*.W. F. Cale '. Como, N. C. 

\ J. E. Hoyle '.'.*.*/ Windsor, N. C. 

-D„ . , Aulander, N C* 

J J. A S°p''e%ht* .I"' Association: 

J. O. Alderman Sunbeam, N. C. 

^T. L. Brown -Edenton, N. C. 

Gatesville, N. C.' 

OFFICERS:. 

T. Gillam, Moderator... 

II i 'J- Williams, Vice-Moderatir ••••Windsor, N. C. 
IN. W. Britton, Clerk Harrellsville, N. C. 

J. S. Mitchell, Treasurer Winton, N. C. 

J. F. Cale, Historian. Winton, N. C, 

The Officers constitute the 'BxecutiVe Comm.tiee of the' Asso"' 



WAffi FOREST UNtVCRSirr 
UBRARY 



CONSTITUTION. 



Name. 

Article 1. This body shall be known as the North Carolina West Chowaii 
Baptist Association. 

Membership. 

Art. 2, It shall be composed of messengers elected by the churches con- 
nected with this body, and all ordained ministers who are members or pas- 
tors, of said churches, together with the officers of this Association, and 
chairmen of all Standing Committees. Each church of one hundred members 
and under shall be entitled to two messengers, and for each additional one 
hundred members, an additional messenger: Provided, that no church shall 
have more than four messengers. 

Objects. 

Art. 3. The objects shall be to devise and recommend measures for increas- 
ing the harmony, the intelligence and the spiritual power of the churches, 
and for developing and directing their energies, their resources and their 
gifts, in advancing the Redeemer's kingdom in the earth. 

Powers and Prerogatives. 

Art. 4. The Association shall have no power to infringe upon the sov- 
ereignty or rights of the churches. It is neither an ecclesiastical nor legisla- 
tive council, nor court of appeal. It may advise the churches and recommend 
measures of usefulness for their adoption, but can not bind them, in any way. 
Yet, in view of the combined wisdom, piety and intelligence of the body, it 
may justly claim for itself, for its objects and for its recommendations the 
very highest consideration and regard. 

Art. 5. The Association may dissolve connection with any church that 
becomes heterodox in doctrine, or disorderly in practice, or that fails to 
represent itself, either by messenger or letter, more than two successive 
sessions, without sufficient reasons, or that treats with contempt its objects 
and requirements, or upon application of a church for dismission. 

Rights of the Churches. 
Art. 6. Each individual church shall hold and exercise all the functions, 
of an independent church of Jesus Christ. As constituent members of this 
Association, the churches shall have right to advise, when desired, in case 
of difficulty, and to suggest plans of usefulness to be adopted. It shall be 
the undisputed privilege of any church to withdraw its membership from, 
this Association whenever it shall so elect. 

Duties of the Churches. 

Art. 7. It shall be the duty of the churches to appoint as messengers, as: 
far as practicable, their most capable members, to require their attendance^ 
and to send by them a contribution to the Association fund to pay for print- 
ing the minutes and other necessary expenses. 

Art. 8. It shall be the duty of each church to send an annual letter to the 
Association, giving: (1) Locality; (2) the names of its pastor and clerk and 
their respective postoffices; (3) the Sabbaths of regular service; (4) the 
church statistics, including the number baptized, received by letter, restored, 
dismissed, deceased, expelled, and aggregate membership, male and female; 
(5) Sabbath School statistics; (6) amount contributed to'benevolent objects 
and the Association Fund; (7) names of messengers and alternates; (8) any 
other information deemed of special importance. 

Organization. 

Art. 9. The officers of this Association shall be a Moderator, Vice-Modera- 
tor, Clerk, Treasurer, and Historian, who shall be elected at each annual 
session, from the members of the Association, and shall continue in office 



Constitution, 



5 



until the next annual election, which election shall be the next order of 
business after the enrollment of messengers. As soon as the new oflacers 
shall have taken their seats, the body shall be declared organized and pre- 
pared for business. 

Duties of Officers. 

Art. 10. It shall be the duty of the Moderator to open the meetings punc- 
tually at time appointed; to enforce the rules; to preserve order, and to 
exercise all the prerogatives of a presiding oflScer, according to the principles 
of parliamentary usage. 

Art. 11. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Moderator to discharge the duties 
of the Moderator in his absence. 

Art. 12. It shall be the duty of the Clerk to keep a faithful record of the 
proceedings of the body, and superintend the printing and distribution of 
same, and to keep on file the printed Minutes and other important documents 
belonging to the body. He may appoint an assistant when necessary. 

Art. 13, It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive and disburse the 
money contributed to the Minute Fund, as directed by the body, and make 
an annual report of same. 

Art. 14. It shall be the duty of the Historian, who shall be elected at 
each annual meeting of the body, to prepare for publication in the Minutes 
an historical sketch of the church with which the Association meets with 
obituaries, incidents, and other facts of the year, that should be preserved; 
and make report to the next Association. 

Art. 15. This Constitution may be altered at any annual session of the 
body by a vote of two-thirds of the members present. 

Resolved 1. That no church shall be entitled to representation in this body 
unless in perfect accord with the Constitution thereof, that fact to be ascer- 
tained by a committee of five on credentials, appointed at each session of 
the body immediately after organization. 

2. The report of this committee shall be the property of the Association 
just as any other report. (Adopted 1898.) 

Resolved, That henceforth this Association withdraw fellowship from any 
church that allows its members to engage in the manufacture and sale of 
intoxicating liquors as a beverage. (1891.) 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this Association that selling intoxicating 
liquors through a dispensary is a violation of the spirit and letter of the 
resolution of our Constitution. (1905.) 



RULES OF ORDER. 

1. The Association shall convene annually at the time and place of its 
own adjournment. 

2. During each annual session it shall meet and adjourn from day to day 
at the hours fixed upon by the body. 

3. All meetings of the Association shall be opened and closed with religious 
•exercises. 

4. A majority of the members present shall be a quorum for the transac- 
tion of business. 

5. No member shall absent himself temporarily without leave of the Mod- 
erator, nor finally without leave of the body. 

6. No member shall speak more than twice on the same subject without 
permission of the body. 

7. No member shall be allowed to talk, stand up, read or move about the 
Tiouse during business, except to gain or impart information under considera- 
tion. 

8. No committee shall be in session during the hour of business without 
permission from the body. 

9. All questions of order not herein provided for shall be decided by 
Mell's Parliamentary Practice. 



6 



Order of Business. 



ORDER OF BUSINESS. 
First Day. 

11:00 a. m. — Introductory Sermon. 

12:00 m. — Enroll delegates. Appoint Committee on Credentials. 
12:30 p. m. — Recess. 
2:00 p. m. — Report of Committee on Credentials; organize, read Constitu- 
tion; call names of churches that failed to represent them- 
selves at last session; receive new churches; invite visitors; 
appoint Committees. 
3:00 p. m. — Orphanage. 
4:00 p. m, — Assignment of homes. 
Adjournment. 

Second Day. 



9 


30 


a. 


m.- 


— Devotional Exercises. 


9 


45 


a. 


m.- 


—Report on Church Statistics. 


10 


00 


a. 


m.- 


—Chowan College. 


11 


00 


a. 


m.- 


—Report on Foreign Missions. 


12 


00 


m. - 


—Report on State Missions. 


1 


00 


p. 


m.- 


—Recess. 


2 


40 


p. 


m.- 


—Report on Education. 


3 


00 


p. 


m.- 


—Home Missions. 


4 


00 


p. 


m.- 


—Miscellaneous Business. 



Adjournment. 

Third Day. 

9:30 a. m. — Devotional Exercises. 
9:45 a. m. — Routine Business. 
10:00 a. m. — Ministers' Relief. 
11:00 a. m. — Report of Committees. 
12:00 m. — Miscellaneous Business. 

Adjournment. y 

A. T. HOWELL, 
R. L. GAY, 

T. T. SPEIGHT, Committee. 



PROCEEDINGS. 



Tuesday, October 24, 1911. 
The West Chowan Baptist Association met this day in its twenty-ninth 
annual session with the Winton Baptist Church, Hertford County, N. C. 
L. A. Parker preached the Introductory sermon from John 6:67-69. 
The list of churches was called and the delegates were enrolled as follows: 

LIST OF DELEGATES. 

Ahoskie— W. T. Holloman, *W. P. Britton, S. E. Dilday. 

Aulander— C. W. Mitchell, W. H. Mitchell, *J. L. Harrington. 

Ashley's Grove — J. K. Vann, G. N. Martin. 

Bethlehem — R. P. Thomas, R. J. Hoggard. 

Bethany— W. C. Hughes, *E. E. Daniel, *J. D. Evans. 

Brantley's Grove — S. A. Dilday *Lutlier Willoughby. 

Buckhorn— S. P. Winborne, W. T. Taylor, R. A. Majette. 

Capehart's — H. J. Ward, *John W. Fearce, *A. J. Carter. 

Cashie — E. L. Gatling, T. Gillam, C. A. Cook, J. A. Johnson. 

Center Grove — L. J. Godwin, T. W. Holloman. 

Chowan— N. W. Britton, J. P. Mitchell. 

Christian Harbor — J. H. Myers, *Starkey Hare. 

Coleraine — Estus White, *A. Pearce D. R. Britton. 

Connaritsa — J. S. Jenkins, John P. Slade, Jolin P. Morris. 

Creekville — Josiah Odom, Joseph Davis. 

Conway — *A. Lassiter, *Noah Burgess. 

Elam— *R. F. Barnes, *J. E. Daniel, *T. J. Bass. 

Galatia— *R. J. Britton, *H. P. Spencer, *W. B. Frances, J. R. Taylor, 

Green's X Roads— W. T. Asbell, *C. W. Mizelle, G. W. Castellow. 

Harrellsville— Frank Williams, R. B. Williford, J. T. Williams. 

Hebron— J. P. Griffin, W. A. Futrell, *Eston Griffin. 

Hillside— S. S. Bunch, W. E. Saunders, Frank Harden. 

Holly Grove — J. J. Tayloe, M. R. Barnes. 

Holly Springs — *J. V. Perry, J. A. Mathews. 

Jackson — *L. J. Holloman, J. L. Newsome Jr. 

Kelford— W. C. Evans, W. E. Parker, *C. L. L. Cobb. 

Lasker — R. C. Lassiter, R. P. Morehead. 

Lawrence's— J. W. Langdale, *T. R. White, F. P. Langdale. 

Lewiston — William Modlin, *H. W. Tayloe. 

Margarettsville — *J. G. Stancell, *D. E. Bridgers. 

Mars Hill — G. H. Powell, J. E. Jordan, Erastus Harrell, E. W. Perry, 

Meherrin— J. K. Parker, *J. C. Chitty, *B. A. Porter, C. C. Parker. 

Mount Carmel — J. G. Joyner, J. C. Stephenson, J. G. White. 

Mount Tabor— E. Brett, *J. D. Sewell, *J. D. Gatling. 

Murfreesboro — J. D. Bruner, *J. C. Spiers. 

Menola — *J. S. Snipes, Floyd Vinson. 

Merry Hill — Monro Britt, Raleigh Phelps. 

Oak Grove — A. E. Saunders, W. M. Marsh, J. B. Lassiter. 

Pine Forest — *P. J. Garner, J. R. Carstarphen. 

Potecasi— A. E. Peele, *E. B. Lassiter, *Fred C. Jenkins. 

Pleasant Grove — C. A. Dunning, J. S. Hughes, W. S. Rawls. 

Poweilsville — Josiah Brown, D. C. Miller. 

Republican— *A. V. Cobb, *W. F. Early, *E. E. Ward, *W. E. Harrell. 
Rich Square— W. J. Lassiter, J. T. Bolton, Horace Lassiter. 
Roanoke — J. L. Newsome, *J. H. Braswell. 
Roquist— *J. E. Tadlock, *J. G. Pritchard. 

Robert's Chapel— D. N. Stephenson, J. H. Stephenson, K. R. Maddrey. 
Ross's— Joseph L. Morris, *J. P. Mizelle, *J. T. Hoggard, W. W. MitchelL 
Sandy Run— W. J. Watson, *J. H. Peele, A. T. Liverman, *E. L. Bishop. 

* Absent. 



8 



Minutes of the 



Seaboard— * J. R. Crocker, *J. P. Long, *J. R. Long. , 

Si loam— *E. Leggett, *B. S. Leggett. ' ] 

Severn — T. O. Joyner, J. B. Mann. ! 

St. John's— *E. W. Baggett, *W. P. Futrell. 

Union— J. E. Brett, *T. S. Holloman. 

Winton — T, L. Lassiter, J. H. Jenkins. 

Woodland— *A. P. Griffin, *C. B. Pond, R. C. Benthall. 

* Absent. 

The Moderator appointed as a Committee on Credentials T. L. Brown, 
W. P. Taylor and J. S. Mitchell. 

T. L. Brown, on behalf of the Winton Church, extended a welcome to the 
delegates and visitors of the Association, and T. T. Speight made response. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by A. T. Howell. 



TUESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The Association reassembled at two o'clock and was led in prayer by J. A. 
Speight. 

The Committee on Credentials reported that the churches so far as it could 
learn were in accord with the Constitution. The report was adopted. 
The following were elected officers for the ensuing year: 

T. Gillam, Moderator. 

J. T. Williams, Vice-Moderator. 

N. W. Britton, Clerk. 

J. S. Mitchell, 'Treasurer. 

J. F. Cale, Historian. 

J. F. Cale read the Constitution and Rules of Order. 

On motion, Powellsville Church was regularly received into the Association. 
A. S. Betts and S. H. Averitt were recognized as visitors, and also J. M. 
Forehand. 

On motion, a committee was appointed to revise some parts of the Con- 
stitution and report at this session. The committee was C. W. Mitchell,' 
A. T. Howell, Q. C. Davis. 

W. B. Waff read the report on the Baptist Orphanage. 

REPORT ON BAPTIST ORPHANAGE. 

Our Baptist Orphanage at Thomasville is now about twenty-six years old. 
During these years more than twelve hundred children have been sheltered 
within her walls and enjoyed her fostering care. There are about three hun- 
dred and eighty-five children there now. This number will be increased 
when the West Chowan building is completed. 

The aim has been from the first to make the Institution not only a home 
for orphan children, but a training school as well, in which they receive 
that instruction and training, physical, mental and spiritual that shall help 
to fit them to meet life's duties and responsibilities. 

Improvements continue to be made. The sick can now be properly cared 
for. The technical building has been completed and occupied, and the Mills 
Memorial Building turned over to Charity and Children, so that they are 
now in better shape for publishing the paper and also for doing first class 
job work. The girls are trained in the useful arts of cooking and sewing. 
When a girl leaves there she is expected to know how to cook a good meal 
and to make her own clothes and the clothes of others. 

The boys work in the shoe shop, in the printing office, in the dairy and 
on the farm. They all, both boys and girls, go to school one-half of the day 
and work the other half. But the best of all is the fine religious training 
and instruction which they receive; having right principles, high ideals and 
jioble purposes instilled in them both by precept and by example. 



West Ch.owan Baptist Association. 



A wise economy is practiced in the management of the institution. It costs 
only about eighty-five dollars a year to support a child there. 

The West Chowan Building is rapidly going up and the money to pay for it 
is much needed. And we wovild urge the churches that have not already 
paid their amounts to try to do so at once and let this matter be finished 
up at least by the last of this year. And be sure not to let the raising of 
this money interfere with the regular contributions to current expenses. 

We earnestly request all our churches to hold Thanksgiving services, 
either on Thanksgiving day, or on some Sunday as near that time as possible, 
and make liberal offerings to the Orphanage. 

We also urgently request all of our Sunday Schools to take at least one 
collection every month for this work, and have a club of Charity and Chil- 
dren (60 cents a copy in clubs of ten or more) and let our people read and 
inform themselves about the good work. And let us all try to com.e nearer 
m.easuring up to our duty to our beloved institution. W. B. WAFF. 

This report was discussed by W. B. Waff. 

On motion, a further discussion of this subject was postponed until the 
evening session. 

The following committees were appointed: 

Tim-e, Place and Preacher for the next session of this bodj^ — E. L. Gatling,, 
J. S. Mitchell and J. P. Morris. 

Finance— C. W. Mitchell, W. P. Britton and H. J. Ward. 

Religious Exercises— Pastor and deacons of Winton Church. 

The Committee on Hospitality assigned homes to the delegates and visitors. 

Adjourned with prayer by W. B. Waff. 



W. B. Waff conducted the religious exercises. 

D. P. Harris, J. O. Alderman, J. E". Hoyle and C. L. Dowell were recognized 
as new pastors in this Association. 

S. H. Averitt addressed the Association on the Baptist Orphanage, after 
which the Orphanage report was adopted. 

J. W. Boone explained the plan for raising the money for the West Chowan 
Building at the Orphanage, which plan was approved by the Association. 

On motion, it was agreed that all money for the West Chowan Building 
be sent to J. W. Boone. 

At this point, A. L. Betts spoke in the interest of the Biblical Recorder. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by S. B. Barnes. 



WEDNESDAY MORNING. 

C. L. Dowell conducted the religious exercises. 

The Statistical and Financial report was made and adopted. 

STATISTICAL AND FINANCIAL REPORT. 
Statistics. 

Number of Churches 55 

Churches reporting no Pastor — 

Churches reporting no Baptisms 5 

Received into the Churches by Baptism 595 

Received by Letter 295 

Received by Restoration 106 



TUESDAY EVENING SESSION. 



Total 



996 



Lost by Letter . . . 
Lost by Exclusion 
Lost by Death . . 



343 
103 
113— 



559 



Gain during the year 



457 



10 



Minutes of the 



Contributions. 



State Missions . 

Home Missions 

Foreign Missions 

Orphanage 

Colleges and Schools. . . . 
Ministerial Education . 

Ministers' Relief 

Sunday School Missions 
Other Objects 



$ 2487.37 



1839.07 
2485.72 
4020.25 
857.97 
461.33 
288.67 



89.58 
2273.26 



Total 



$14803.22 



A committee consisting of T. T. Speight, C. W. Scarborough and D. Cale 
was appointed to present resolutions to the Association suitable to the mem- 
ory of M. L. Green. 

The report on Chowan College was presented by C. P. Scott. 



Never perhaps has the interest in general education been so wide-spread 
and profound as it is to-day. The demand for the training of all of the 
powers of the mind to the point of the highest efficiency amounts to the 
sternness of a command. Secular institutions are making a sincere effort 
to respond to this great need. This response, however, can provide the de- 
sired culture only in part. Only mental discipline comes properly within 
the sphere of governmental service. It is no part of the State's function 
to make provision for spiritual culture. 

Therefore, we must look to the Christian school for the highest scheme 
of education. Here effort is made for the expansion, purification and en- 
nobling of all of man's powers — mental, spiritual and physical. The life, 
instructions and all of the activities of the institution must be pervaded by 
a spiritual atmosphere. Then the great principles of Christianity must be 
taught in their primitive purity, as drawn immediately from the word of 
God. This is vital to the structure of Christian character, and at the founda- 
tion of all denominational life, power and progress. 

Thus logically the denominational College becomes an imperative clamor- 
ous necessity. In such an institution, not only the mental, but the spiritual 
interests of the student will be fostered and trained, and the distinctive de- 
nominational principles, and ordinances will be taught systematically as to 
mode and meaning. 

Such an institution you have in Chowan College. It is yours, and you 
should be proud of it. Its history is long and honorable, and all of its achieve- 
ments have been highly gratifying. For sixty-three years it has been the 
center of intellectual and spiritual light and power. The mental, spiritual 
and denominational character of entire communities have been changed 
under its influence. Its prestige and power are greater to-day than ever 
before. 

The competent and resourceful President, Dr. J. D. Bruner, assisted by 
his carefully selected faculty, has greatly enlarged the curriculum, and 
raised the standard for graduation — thus furnishing sound learning to ail who 
enter those classic halls. The successful opening of the present session was 
truly phenomenal — the reward for the extraordinary efforts of the President 
and his associates. 

The past is safe, the present is inspiring, and what the future shall be 
remains for the friends and patrons of the College to determine. The hour 
has struck for a large, intelligent and wisely directed movement to be 
started to meet present, pressing needs. The supreme appeal of the College 
is for an adequate endowment. Plans should be adopted at this meeting 
of this Association to provide for this — because it is vitally important. It is 



REPORT ON CHOWAN COLLEGE. 



nest Chotvan Baptist Association. U 

C. p. SCOTT, 

mx,^ , For the Committee. 

m.?uter^ne;*te7Lrer.^ exception o. twent. 

Dancy Cale presented i^'le^oTZ Po^^^mZTo^ °' °°"ege. 
REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

It is \p^^Kr sSn^L\^n' 'li^tLt trt"4™r °'7°^'^ -an^elization. 
opportunities are before us. CWna wkh 440 OOn nnn"*^?"' ^P'^ndid 
througl, a marvelous transformation Now is ?he tfrn^ t ^""^ ^ P''"^'"? 
the gospel. Japan is leading the Orient L = t° S'™ these millions 

Mohammedanism threatens to submerge Afrta ^VT Christ? 

p SerofToma^is'^.! f^/^re^^l^ M^^o I^d^H.'r s^^l 
rbef'oren;^- wUT^.-^rt fet hTn ^tle^f'^nt:? 

.ent out last .ear- 

liundreds of others. The MissionaS . TJl^ helpers, and are training 
Will soon report tens of th^^anrS 'on^^^^^^^^^^ '"^^^^^^^ ''^'^ ^^^^ ^nf 

growth continues. There are sevpn wl -^^'S W^ent rapid 

students and nine Theofogical Tvlni^ZT^ ^'^T""^ ^^ith [40 

are fifteen medical missio1.S es treaSL man^ thn ^ ''f ^^^^e 
opening the way to the hearts and thp hmf ^J^ousands of patients and 
Have seven hospitals and twelve disnentr^p! ""1"^°^^' P^^P^^- We 
assisted by five missionary nurses and mn.v ' ^^'""^ missionaries 
patients. The printing Dlant^Trl o ^ ^^^^^""^ helpers treated 40 716 

pages Of religious Ktefatur'" u thl angial^ Bme .na millions o'f 

The worli has grown so ranir]i.; fw 1 People, 
people were willing to gi^e ?f w« theTotUf ' ^^^^ ^^^^ our 

^ow, we must greatly Enlarge Tr Offering fZ\lTr''^'^-^ '^'^ ^^^^^^^^^ 
were $510,008.97, a small gain ovpr fh The total receipts for last year 

Of $89,600.00 now rests' UrthT work' ^ThL'stuld t --"-^^^ted 
To do so and maintain the work as it now tni -^^ P^'^ ^^is year. 
Wi l the churches give it? It is a LndTtio; Thl/^^n '^^^ ^^^^^ $600,000,00. 

gmng but it is absolutely imperative un L 'o"^ ^'"^''"^ '"'"'^"^ 

tills great cause suffer. Let us rai Jp fh^l our people are willing to let 
^^^^^ake an advance in the wor^ ^"^^"^^ ^^ore that we 

by subslJirnT?^^^^ by sympathy and prayer; 

tracts which can be had for the askini Iw ^^^^^^^^ distributing 
and by 1 b^ral gifts from the weaLy by 'sending "^T^"^"'^ '^""^^^ 
waiting for the season of pressu^Hn March ..^^a "" •1^^''' ^'^^^ ^^^^^ no 
Pledge ourselves to do all in our powef ?o rais A^^'^^ 2. That we solemnly 

has been asked of our Association ?his year ^ ^""^^^^^^ ^^i^^Ji 

This report was discussed by D Cale T t.i. ^' 
^he report on State Mission^ was"?^ld^by'?.'^°.^SerboTo^f 
REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 

He n^oTtaLTul^ ho^fve^ 'X""^ '""^'^ ^^^^^^^^ to His kingdom 
be preached in His name 'amo'ng'aU nit oTs"'Bu?'th ^^^^^ance sfouTd 
at Jerusalem, and that was Stfte Mis^^s ' o^^ L ^^ht lorn? 



12 



Minutes of the 



The preaching was to reach to the ends of the earth, but to hold on to 
Jerusa/lem. This is God's plan. Has it been disregarded by any church 
in any place without serious consequences? Planting churches, like conver- 
sion, means the beginning of a struggle to end only when He comes. 

While satan lives there can be no place nor time to stop planting and' 
nourishing churches. State Missions is making way for the flow of the 
Life Giving Stream. If we show ourselves worthy of the trust imposed, 
we must see to it that the waters of this stream shall reach ankles, knees,, 
loins, and be waters to swim in. Nor must we rest till the gospel shall reach 
and make alive for Christ everything in the State. 

State Missions makes at least three appeals to us: 

I. As Citizens. Every citizen should, with intelligent interest, watch the 
dangers of his State, and, in time, lend himself to the best methods of avert- 
ing those dangers. No citizen of North Carolina would be willing to see his 
State heathenized. The distant horizon is often the most important, if not 
the most interesting, object of vision. 

When, in 1893, the Congress of Religions at the Chicago World's Fair 
invited the religionists of India to America to compare religions, the way 
was opened for the introduction of some of the worst forms of idolatry and 
superstition. In 1901 Hindooism took root in some of the New England 
cities; and to-day there are 14,000 converts with centers of worship in 30' 
prominent cities, and half dozen magnificent temples. 

And what is this Hindooism? A recent standard magazine article declares 
that its rites have much in common with the worship of Baal and Moloch; 
and the essential feature in this worship in India^ — its home — is the adora- 
tion of a nude woman and the dancing girl trained for the embraces of the 
priest. The chief idol of this system of heathenism is a horrible image 
called "The Divine Mother." It is nude and has four hands. In one hand it 
bears a huge knife, in another a bloody human head. Her necklace is a 
string of human skulls, her belt is adorned with human hands cut from 
her enemies, it is folly to say we are not in danger, when we know that 
in several New England States clubs for the study of this religion are as 
popular — as fashionable as Browning or Shakespeare clubs. It is not the 
ignorant but the intelligent v/ho are embracing this cult. 

Another danger, which appeals to the citizen, is Roman Catholicism. That 
is on the near horizon. Every unbiased citizen must know that Roman 
Catholicism is the arch enemy of civil and religious liberty and our free 
institutions. Our own State Mission Secretary tells us that North Carolina 
is one of the six States in the South in which Roman Catholics made a 
greater per cent, of increase in the last ten years than the Protestants. 
We as citizens know there is no way to avoid these dangers, but to preempt 
the ground, every inch of it, with the pure gospel. Hence the appeal of State 
Missions to the citizen. 

II. The appeal of State Missions to the Christian. Do our people know, 
and knowing do they realize, the religious condition of North Carolina?" 

Only 38 per cent, of our population is Christian. North Carolina is the 
only State in the South in which the percentage of increase in church-mem- 
bership did not keep pace with the growth of population in the past ten 
years. The proportion of chiirch membership to population is over 4 pet cent 
less than it was ten years ago. To put the facts boldly there are 650,000 
people in North Carolina, over ten years old, who are not Christians. We 
know this condition is to be met largely by State Missions. Christians can 
not, without guilt, be either indifferent to, nor half-hearted in this matter.. 
Hence the appeal of State Missions to Christians. 

III. The appeal of State Missions in North Carolina to the Baptists. Our 
activity and success in the past have put us in a position from which we 
must advance. To stand still or to retreat is to advertise our unfaithfulness 
to Christ, and cover ourselves with shame. 

White Baptists in North Carolina number 221,518, or about one in nine 
of the population, and nearly one in four of the entire church membership 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



13 



of the State. Tliis gives us the ears of, and a chance at more people than 
any other denomination has. It puts at our command more money than 
any other denomination has. It gives us the opportunity to be the greatest 
power in rolling back the great wave of commercialism which threatens to 
submerge the spiritual forces of the State. It gives us the opportunity to 
root out in large measure the isms that are among us, and to repulse 
errors and systems of errors which, in the near future, we shall surely have 
to antagonize. 

Once more: It makes us able to stand, as we should, in the front rank of 
our Southern Sisters in their combined efforts to capture and hold this fair 
land for Christ. These opportunities and responsibilities are ours because 
of our members, our wealth, and the further fact that we preach and hold 
in larger mold the purest gospel preached by any people in the State. Our 
State Mission Board stands ready to help us entere these open doors. 

Israel would not see the danger line in the distance, nor resist the begin- 
nings of sin near at hand. When in captivity they saw their folly and sin. 
Shall we profit by their experience? 

Enlarged opportunities demand larger contributions. Your committee 
recommend liberal advances for this object by our churches. 

C. W. SCARBOROUGH, 

For Committee. 

This report was discussed by L. Johnson and was adopted. 

The Association adjourned, with prayer by C. W. Scarborough. 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The Association met at about 2:30 o'clock and was led in prayer by R. 
L. Gay. 

The report on Education was read by S. B. Barnes. 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL EDUCATION. 

Your Committee believes that only God-called men should enter the min- 
istry. After they have been called, they should avail themselves of all pos- 
sible preparation for their life's work and then give their time, energy and 
talents to the building up of the kingdom of God. To this end your Com- 
mittee heartily commend the work of the Board of Education at Wake Forest 
College. There are more young ministers in College now than ever before 
in its history — the number being eighty-three. Sixty-three of these are to 
receive aid from the Board of Education. 

Several others are expecting to be there before long, and they will need 
aid. At the close of last session the board was about $750.00 in debt. Your 
Committee respectfully asks that all the churches increase their gifts to this 
very important object. When we give to the Board of Education we are 
giving the gospel to the people. 

Brethren of West Chowan, let us give more and pray more for the Board 
■of Education, that it may be able under God to train His men for service. 

S. B. BARNES, 

D. N. STEPHENSON, 

Committee. 

Tlie report was spoken to by S. B. Barnes, J. E. Hoyle, and was adopted. 
The report on Home Missions was read by L. A. Parker. 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 
The whole world is pressing in upon us to-day with its need and with its 
opportunity. You have felt the need and heard the call to spread the 
gospel throughout all lands. This is a critical moment in the world's history, 
and it is also an auspicous moment. Never since the discovery of this 
continent, now more than four centuries ago, has there been any time of 
such cliange, of such advance in the exploration and development of every 



14 



Minutes of the 



part of the earth's surface as we see now in our own time. Now is the time- 
for us to fulfill these responsibilities that have devolved upon us. 

The old Testament prophets^ whose eyes kindled with a vision of the world 
turning to God, in furthering this divine purpose gave their whole lives to 
Home Missions. In the Great Commission our Lord gave commands that 
extend to the utmost limits of the earth, but for all time they also include- 
for each disciple the limits of his own community. They radiate out from 
that, and take in every place between it and the place furtherest away. 

In the prosecution oi the purpose of our Lord for the redemption of the 
world, Peter and Philip and Stephen and James were as truly carrying out 
the divine plan of missions when they preached to the Jews as Paul was- 
when he carried the glad news to the gentiles. Foreign Missions succeed 
only when it settles down and makes itself at home. Home Missions is mis- 
sions making for itself a real home in the hearts of men, and in the economic,, 
social and civic relationships of our own land. We must insist that the 
gospel of grace shall rise so high in the hearts of God's people that .it shall 
overflow and enrich the arid fields of greed and injustice and crime, and 
wickedness in our own country. If we do not, we surely can not think that 
our gospel is strong enough to conquer heathen nations. Is our Christianity 
worth propagating? Not, Is Christianity worth propagating? We have no< 
doubt as to that; but, is our Christianity worth propagating? Have I a sal- 
vation worth passing on? What am I in personality? My life is a message. 
Whether at home or abroad, men will not come in large numbers to our 
churches, they will not read our Bibles; but they read our lives. What is my 
life? When God wished to save the world it was not through a miracle, 
through a book, through a mass of work through a teaching; it was through 
the revelation of a personality. All Christ left was twelve personalities, in 
whom He could reveal and repeat His life. But the world was changed. 
If there was not a Christian beside the people to the West Chowan Asso- 
ciation, we could go out and win the world if we would let Him pour 
His life through us, if we would allow Christ to live in us the rest of our 
days. The old psychology said, "A man does what he is." The new psy- 
chology says, "A man is what he does." Unless we choose to go back to- 
lower levels, we can forever be what we become to-day. Moreover, how 
shall we reply if the heathen nations shall say to us. Physician, heal thyselt?' 

Out of 92,000,000 population in America only about 20,000,000 are members, 
of evangelical denominations. About 12,000,000 belong to the Catholics, but. 
their faith is so foreign to the genius of American institutions and so ob- 
scures the teachings of the Savior in its idolatrous dogmas of saint worship- 
and papal infallibility that we must regard this religious body as a rantized. 
paganism. 

The present growth of the South in material prosperity is marvelous. Our 
vast material resources are being developed with almost greedy haste. 
This section now has more wealth than the entire nation had when the 
Civil War began. Shall this material prosperity be a curse or a blessing: 
to the South? The Christian people of the South hold the answer. We 
did not make the country. We did not grow these corn, cotton and wheat 
fields. They are God's gift. These billions spell power, but they spell re- 
sponsibility also. Are we going to waste them in riotous living, selfishness, 
and love of ease? Is our manhood going to be dwarfed by the money power?- 
If the prosperity of our people is devoted to selfish luxury and pleasure — it 
will become a curse to the people and the nation. We stamp the name of 
God on our minted coin, but only as that name is engraved on the living- 
hearts of men will it avail for the nation, or for a lost soul. Money is power 
when linked with personality. You put twenty dollars on that table and 
leave it there. It will feed nobody, make nobody any happier; it will do 
nothing; it is helpless. But you put your hand on it and go out in the street 
and that is twenty dollars' worth of something. It is powerful when linked 
with personality, helpless when not linked with pexsonality. The greatest 



West Chowan Baptist A^^sociation. 



15 



single threat to the power of religion in the South to-day is the Mammon 
of unconsecrated wealth. 

The Home Mission Board conducts many departments of activity for saving 
the people and preparing them for lives of service. It has about forty-five 
workers among the foreigners. These work in cities where foreigners land 
and in places where they settle to live. America has many serious questions 
and grave problems. I am convinced that the immigration question is our 
gravest problem, and its solution our most urgent duty. When you have 
settled rightly the immigation question you have largely settled the question 
of the suppression of the saloon and the salvation of the city Of 92,000,000 
people in the United States, according to the last census, only 41,000,000 
are native, white-born of American parents; 16,500,000 are immigrants, and 
24,500,000 are born of foreign parentage. Therefore, 41,000,000 are of foreign 
parentage. 9,000,000 foreigners came to the United States in the last ten 
years; 1,041,000 came last year. America is now the rendezvous of the na- 
tions. Foreigners are rapidly turning to the South to find homes and em- 
ployment. Present statistics show 3,000,000 people in the South of foreign 
parentage. 50,000 came last year. 18,000 went to Texas alone. Missouri 
has 800,000 foreigners and Texas has 1,000,000. What has this to do with 
Home Missions? Much every way. Home Missions is the philosophy of 
making a real Christian civilization in our country. The foreigners are a 
challenge to our faith. If Christ is enthroned in your heart, you will feel 
an imperative duty to save these souls and will feel an indescribable joy 
in that work. 

The Home Mission Board has twenty-eight mountain mission schools 
with 127 teachers and 4,500 students, eighteen trained evangelists who last 
year baptized about 3,000 converts, thirty-five negro evangelists working 
effectively among the Southern Negroes, thirty-four missionaries who supply 
fifty-six churches and mission stations in Cuba^ five missionaries and four 
helpers doing a successful work in the Canal Zone, a church building depart- 
ment which aided in building 289 churches last year^ and twenty missionaries 
among the Indians in Oklahoma. 

Besides the above, the Home Mission Board participates co-operatively 
(principally with State Mission Boards) in a number of States in maintain- 
ing about 1,100 missionary pastors. This co-operative mission work is in line 
with the Convention's instructions to the Board to form the closest possible 
relationship with the existing agencies of the denomination in the various 
States. 

To the end that our Board may enlarge its activities and do for the 
denomination a work worthy of so great a Christian body and commensurate 
with the present urgent needs, your committee pleads for regular and large 
collections for Home Missions in the Churches. Our board could wisely 
expend a million dollars a year for it. It ought to do it, if we can only 
bring our churches to make a liberal response to its needs. Surely Southern 
Baptists must raise the $400,000 asked, and our own State its apportionment 
of $26,000.00. 

Your Committee recommends: 

1. That our pastors be requested to make an earnest effort at least once 
during the year to preach a special sermon on Home Missions and the mag- 
nitude and importance of the problems involved. 

2. That a club of subscribers be raised in each church for the Home Field, 
the unusually attractive and illuminating monthly magazine of the Home 
Board. 

3. That churches and pastors to be encouraged to make large use of the 
Home Board's informing tracts and sample copies of the Home field, both 
of which are free for the asking. The address of the Home Mission Board 
is No. 723 Austell Building, Atlanta, Ga. 

LLOYD ARCHIBALD PARKER, 
C. L. L. COBB, 
J. W. LANGDALE, 

Committee. 



16 



Minutes of the 



The report was discussed by L. A. Parker, J. C. Scarborough, C. W. 
Scarborough, T. T. Speight, and was adopted. 

Q. C. Davis read the report of the committee appointed to make some 
needed changes in the Constitution. This report was adopted. 

REPORT ON CHANGE OF CONSTITUTION. 

Your Committee appointed to take under consideration the revision of the 
Constitution and Rules of Order of this Association, begs leave to submit 
the following report: We recommend — 

1. That article 2 of the Constitution be amended to read as follows: 
"Art. 2. It shall be composed of messengers elected by the churches con- 
nected with this body, and all ordained ministers who are members or 
pastors, of said churches, together with the officers of this Association, and 
Chairmen of all Standing Committees. Each church of one hundred members 
and under shall be entitled to two messengers, and, for each additional one 
hundred members, an additional messenger: Provided, that no church shall 
have more than four messengers." 

2. That Article 6, defining the "Rights of the Churches," be amended to 
read as follows: 

"Art. 6. Each individual church shall hold and exercise all the functions of 
an independent church of Jesus Christ. As constituent members of this 
Association the churches shall have right to advise, when desired, in case of 
difficulty, and to suggest plans of usefulness to be adopted. It shall be the 
undisputed privilege of any church to withdraw its membership from this 
Association whenever it shall so elect." 

3. That Article 9, entitled "Organization," be amended to read as follows: 
"Art. 9. The officers of this Association shall be a Moderator, Vice-Modera- 
tor, Clerk, Treasurer, and Historian, who shall be elected at each annual 
session, from the members of the Association, and shall continue in office 
until the next annual election, which election shall be the next order of 
business after the enrollment of messengers. As soon as the new officers 
shall have taken their seats, the body shall be declared organized and pre- 
pared for business." 

4. That Article 14, setting forth "the duty of the Historian," be amended to 
read as follows: 

"Art. 14. It shall be the duty of the Historian, who shall be elected at each 
annual meeting of the body, to prepare for publication in the Minutes an 
historical sketch of the church with which the Association meets, with 
obituaries, incidents, and other facts of the year, that should be preserved, 
and make report to the Association." 

5. That wherever the words "delegate," or "delegates", occur in the Con- 
stitution, or Rules or Order, the words. Messenger, and Messengers, shall be 
inserted in their stead. Respectfully submitted, 

Q. C. DAVIS, 
A. T. HOWELL, 
R. L. GAY, 

Committee. 



WEDNESDAY EVENING SESSION. 

J. F. Gale conducted the devotional exercises. 

T. T. Speight read the resolutions which the committee had prepared re- 
lating to M. L. Green. 

RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT OF REV. M. L. GREEN. 

Brother Green was born in Gates County, N. C, in the year 1841. In early 
life he gave himself to the Lord and joined Cool Spring Baptist Church, and 
there served for many years as a faithful member. When a young man he 
was elected deacon of his church and greatly beloved. 

In 1861 at the breaking out of the civil war he enlisted in Company F. 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



17 



<of the 5th N. C; he was brave and faithful as a soldier; he was wounded 
three times on the battlefield. When the war was over he came home, went 
to work in his church and in the field to make an honest living. After a few 
years he felt that the Lord wanted him to preach the gospel. Without any 
educational advantages he entered the work, and by God's help he did a 
great and grand work for the kingdom. No man is more to be praised than 
Brother Green. 

Resolved first. That the brotherhood of the ministry loses a worthy co- 
laborer and the Association a valuable man. 

Second. We bow with submission to the will of him that doeth all things 
well. 

Third. That a copy of these resolutions be sent to his widow and a copy 
spread on our minutes. T. T. SPEIGHT, 

For the Committee. 

The resolutions were spoken to by T. T. Speight, J. C. Scarborough, J. A. 
Speight, W. P. Shaw, Sr., C. W. Scarborough, D. Gale, J. R. Carstarphen. 
The resolutions were adopted. 

According to appointment, the matter of planning for the endowment of 
Chowan College was taken up, and was discussed by J. D. Bruner, A. T. 
Howell, J. C. Scarborough. 

Adjourned with prayer by W. B. Waff. 



THURSDAY MORNING SESSION. 

A. T. Howell led the devotional exercises, after which the Vice-Moderator, 
J. T. Williams, called the Association to order and called on C. L. Dowell 
to lead in prayer. 

On motion, a committee, J. S. Mitchell, was appointed to call on the 
churches of this Association asking for a contribution to help G. C. Wilder 
in completing his education for his work among deaf-mutes. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MINISTERS' RELIEF BOARD. 

The name of the Ministers' Relief Board gives fully the purpose for which 
this Board was organized. If this Board cannot hold out the cheering in- 
spiration and hope for great things that are to be done, it can remind us 
«of that gratitude without which there is no real religion. 

Former reports have given fully the detail of this Board's organization, 
when and where it came into being, and the names of those who have 
composed it and have given its purposes their unselfish labor. The method 
of assistance is most wise. Of all donated funds, only one third can be used 
for distribution. The other two thirds go to a permanent fund, which be- 
comes interest bearing. 

It is cause for marked congratulation that West Chowan Association has 
no beneficiary of this fund. Our Ministers are still in health and vigor and all 
'doing active work and are reasonably well supported. It is nevertheless our 
bounden duty to contribute to this fund. When a Godly man has served 
the churches and people to old age, and worn himself out in that service, 
he ceases to be the property or charge of any one church, or of any one 
community. He should the more be recognized as the personal charge of 
every Baptist in North Carolina. 

The Minister is the poorest paid laborer in all our life. He has little 
chance to accumulate. If he receives compensation more than sufficient 
for his needs, or by other efforts adds to his store and accumulates a small 
pittance for those dependent on him, he becomes at once the target for 
criticism and suspicion. 

Those who are now participants in this fund have for the most part been 
:pioneers in our great work. While we go from work to work with ease 
and rapidity, they went by slow and toilsome journeys. No rushing train 
carried them from the seashore to the outlying remote missionary work, 



18 



Minnies of the 



but the shadow of many a night found them many miles from a habitation., 
and man and beast toiled on into the night. No electric lights gave brilliance- 
to their well apportioned churches, but many times nothing save the single 
tallow dip flickeringly lighted the log meeting house. All honor then to these- 
pioneers of faith and hope and love for the Master. 

Brethren^ duty and pleasure should impel us to be generous in dealing: 
with these fathers in Israel. We can suggest no new scheme by means of 
which this fund shall be increased. We can only adopt the way that is as 
old as effort — and that is — Give. 

There should be at least one stated collection for this fund, to present 
the opportunity to give and also to remind us of our duty to give at other- 
seasons as God has blessed us in basket and in store, to the generous support 
of those whose lives have been spent in the Master's Service. 

Respectfully submitted, J. H. MATTHEWS, 

For the Committee. 

Remarks on this report were made by N. W. Britton, J. D. Bruner, J. A. 
Speight, J. T. Williams. The report was adopted. 

HISTORIAN'S REPORT. 

Your Historian begs leave to submit the following report: 
Standing to-day at the close of another year's work, and reviewing its his- 
tory, we are encouraged by the substantial 

Progress 

which has been made. While results have been far from satisfactory^ they- 
indicate that we have not been idle. 

Reports from our Churches during the revival season indicate that 

Revival Meetings 

have been unusually fruitful. As a result our Cnurches have been stimulated 
and greatly strengthened, and have gained in membership by baptism more- 
than five hundred. 

Since our last meeting we have imported three 

New Pastors ^ 
who add strength to our ministry. Pastor D. P. Harris is located in Winton, 
and is shepherding Chowan and Union. Pastor C. L. Dowell is located in: 
Ahoskie and is shepherding Ahoskie, Bethlehem and Oak Grove. Pastor H. 
F. Brinson is located near Ahoskie, and is shepherding Holly Springs, Brant- 
ley's Grove and Holly Grove. 

Colerain Church is fortunate in having as pastor Elder J. O. Alderman, of 
Edenton. A few 

Pastoral Changes 

have been reported to your Historian. 

Elder C. W. Scarborough has resigned his field of labor. He will probably- 
locate at Murfreesboro, and take half work. 

John P. Cale has resigned the work at Sandy Run. He goes to Rich Square- 
for two Sundays. 

Pastor L. A. Parker has resigned the work at Potecasi. 

During the session 

Powellsville Church 

was admitted into the Association. Our churches now number fifty-six. 
The year has thinned our ranks, and, as usual 

Necrology 

must have considerable space. 

Brethren C. R. Harrell and D. M. Beale and Sister Georgia Hart, all of 
Potecasi, have died within the year. 

Margarettsville has sustained loss in the deaths of Bro. J. E. StanceU and 
Sister Elizabeth Bridgers. 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



19' 



Bro. James Howell and Sister Susan Elizabeth Barnes, faithful members 
of Severn Church, have recently passed over the river. 

Brethren James H. Tyler and Mark Edwards, of Severn, have also fallen 
on sleep. 

Conway Church has suffered loss in the deaths of Sisters Fannie Boone- 
and Lemma Vann. 

Lawrence's Church loses by death Brethren W. R. Outlaw^ aged 83 years, 
and Charley Lawrence, aged 23 years. 

Merry Hill Church sustains loss in the death of Bro. J. T. Butterton. 

Roberts Chapel Church suffers loss in the deaths of several of its members. 

Sister Lucy Gay Stephenson, wife of Deacon D. N. Stephenson, and mother 
of Elder R. D. Stephenson, was a godly woman and Christian mother. 

Sister Nancy J. Stephenson, wife of T. B. Stephenson, and mother of J. H. 
Stephenson died July last in the 91st year of her age. 

Sister Mary Boyd fell on sleep October 26, 1911. 

Bro. Oliver Woodard, a pillar of the church, died October, 1910. 

Lewiston loses two faithful members in the deaths of Sisters Eddie Boze-- 
mon, B. Porter and Bro. B. C. Vick. 

Chowan Church suffers loss in the death of Sister Sallie M. Taylor. "Truly 
a good woman has gone to her well merited reward." 

Rich Square loses by death Bro. M. M. Smith, Sister Martha Conwell and 
Bro. Jacob Newsome. 

Sandy Run has lost Bro. James P. Lassiter, Sr., Sisters Willie Peele, Martha 
Acree and Sallie Vick. 

The session 

At Winton 

will be remembered as one of the best in our history. All the old officers- 
were re-elected. Reports showed careful preparation, and were ably dis- 
cussed. Among the visitors we recall the following: L. Johnson, S. H. 
Averitt, L. Hofler and A. L. Betts. The next session goes to Republican, 
T. L. Brown to preach. JOHN F. CALE, Historian. 

REPORT OF TREASURER. 
James S. Mitchell, Treasurer, in account with the West Chowan Association: 



October 27, 1910. 

To amount from Finance Committee for State Missions $ 35.00? 

To amount from Finance Committee for Home Missions 35.00- 

To amount from Finance Committee for Foreign Missions 126.55, 

To amouilt from Finance Committee for Ministerial Education 22.00 

To amount from Finance Committee for Orphanage 7.26: 

To amount from Finance Committee for Old Ministers' Relief 5.00 ■ 

To amount from Finance Committee for Minute Fund 96.65 

December 9. 

To amount from Woman's Missionary Society for Minute Fund 9.00- 



$330.46 

October 31, 1910. Credit. 

By amount paid Walters Durham for State Missions $ 35.00- 

By amount paid Walters Durham for Home Missions 35.00- 

By amount paid Walters Durham for Foreign Missions 120.55 

By amount paid Walters Durham for Ministerial Education 22.00 

By amount paid Walters Durham for Orphanage 7.26; 

By amount paid Walters Durham for Old Ministers' Relief 5.00- 

November 9. By amount paid N. W. Britton, Clerk 30.00' 

December 9. By amount paid Edwards & Broughton for minutes .... 74 . 34 



$229.15 

To balance due Minute Fund 1.31; 

Respectfully submitted. 



JAMES S. MITCHELL, Treasurer.. 

The report was adopted. 



20 



Mhimtes of the 



REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Received for Minute Fund $100.85 

Paid J. S. Mitchell, Treasurer $100.85 

C. W. MITCHELL, 

H. J. WARD, Committee. 

The report was adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER. 

Report of Committee on Time, Place and Preacher for next session of this 
body: Place, Republican Baptist Church; Time, Tuesday after the Fourth 
Sunday in October, 1912; to Preach Introductory sermon, T. L. Brown; 
Alternate C. L. Dowell. 

E. L. CATLING, 

J. S. MITCHELL, 

J. P. MORRIS, Committee. 

The report was adopted. 

RESOLUTIONS. 

Whereas, the work is broadening and enlargement a necessity; and 
Whereas, there was a falling off in contributions to Missions by some of 
•^our churches within the year; be it 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this Association that both messengers 
and pastors use their influence with their respective churches to secure 
larger contributions to all Convention objects during the coming year. 

JOHN F. CALE. 

RESOLUTION ON TEMPERANCE. 

Whereas, under Federal regulations, inter-state shipments of intoxicating 
liquors are delivered to the consignee before the State can have jurisdiction 
of the same, and 

Whereas, by this arrangement the State is seriously hampered in carrying 
"out its policies relative to the traffic in intoxicating liquors, and 

Whereas, we believe the State should have full control under its policy 
powers over all liquors within its borders, whether domestic or interstate; 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we hereby declare ourselves in favor of such action by the 
Congress of the United States, as will guarantee to the States the fullest 
jurisdiction over all intoxicants consigned to them from the time they enter 
the State, and to this end, we request the members of Congress, both in the 
Senate and the House, from this State, to support such legislation as is 
contemplated by the Curtis-Sheppard Bill now pending in Congress. 

RESOLUTION OF THANKS. 

Resolved, That we extend our sincere thanks to this church, the other 
churches of the community, and to the entire community for the magnificent 
entertainment we have received. C. W. SCARBOROUGH. 

The following were appointed delegates: J. S. Mitchell, T. Gillam, J. D. 
Bruner, to the Baptist State Convention; T. T. Speight to the Southern Bap- 
^tist Convention. 

J. F. Cale was re-appointed a member of the State Mission Board. 
The Association then adjourned with prayer by C. W. Scarborough. 

T. GILLAM, Moderator. 

N. W. BRITTON, Clerk. 



West Chowan Baptist Associaton. 



21 



CHURCH STATISTICS. 



CHURCHES. 



Received. 



Ahoskie 

Aulander 

Ashley's Grove. . 

Bethlehem 

Bethany 

Brantley's Grove 

Buckhorn 

Capehart's 

Cashie * 

Center Grove... 

Chowan 

Christian Harbor 

Coleraine 

Connaritsa 

Creeksville 

ConM^ay 

Elam 

Galatia 

Green's X Roads 
Harrellsville . . . 

Hebron 

Hillside 

Holly Grove 

Holly Springs. . . 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Lawrence's 

Lewiston 

Margarettsville . 

Mars Hill 

Meherrin 

Mount Carmel.. 
Mount Tabor. . . . 
Murfreesboro . . . 

Menola 

Merry Hill 

Oak Grove 

Pine Forest 

Potecasi 

Pleasant Grove. 
Powellsville . . . . 

Republican 

Rich Square 

Roanoke 

Roquist 

Robert's Chapel. 

Ross's 

Sandy Run 

Seaboard 

Siloam 

Severn 

St. John's 

Union 

Winton 

Woodlan d 

^Total 



Lost. 



10 



3 2 

5951 2951 



1 

"106 



19 
14 
14 
161 10 

9| 



15 
4 . 

1 
13 
12 

5 

2 
12 

6 

81 

8 

3 
10 

6 
10 



...I 



6 2 

996 1 343 1 



4 

1031 



Membership. 



Location and Date- 
of Constitution. 



159 
157 
76 
77 
128 
97 
135 
135 



90 
59 
86 
183 
153 
83 
91 
111 
1.54 
123 
79 
69 
58 
63 
31 
41 



122 
107 
24 
231 



288 
200 
69 
109 
159 
101 
112 
174 



96 
71 
82 
212 
195 
75 
85 
146 
188 
131 
78 
73 
47 
86 
41 
48 
107 
73 
131 
120 
28 
231 
1691 156 
91| 129 
1241 167 



33 
47 
53 
53 
21 
149 



61 
36 
49 
72 
34 
112 



1231 188 



36 
183 
100 
39 
31 
95 
354 
151 
42 
65 
83 
75 
75 
72 



38 
235 
120 
58 
39 
158 
488 
200 
53 
67 
67 
97 
80 
94 



447 Hertford Co 1804 

3.57 Bertie Co 1886- 

145 Northampton Co. 1910 

186 Hertford Co 183-5 

287 Bertie Co 1881 

198 Hertford Co 1877 

247 Hertford Co 18.35 

309 1 Bertie Co 1824 

Bertie Co 1770 

186 Bertie Co 1897 

130 Hertford Co 1895 

168 1 Hertford Co 1881 

3951 Bertie Co 1780 

.348 1 Bertie Co 1789 



158 
176 



Northampton 
Northampton 
Northampton 
Northampton 

Bertie Co 

157 1 Hertford Co. 



342 
254 



Co. 1892 
Co. 1905- 
Co.1844 
Co. 1859 
. . .1874 
. . .1875 



113 1 559 1 5394 16439 1 



142 Northampton Co. 1856 
105 Bertie Co 1885 

149 Bertie Co 1804 

72 Hertford Co 1907 

89 Northampton Co. 1882 

196 Bertie Co 1898 

133 Northampton Co. 1906 

254 Bertie Co 1874 

227 Bertie Co 3883 

52 Northampton Co. 1889 

462 Bertie Co 1854 

325 Hertford Co 1729- 

220 Northampton Co. 1826 
291 Hertford Co 1839- 

94 Hertford Co 1843 

83 Hertford Co 1908 

102 Bertie Co 1910 

125 Hertford Co 1894 

55 Northampton Co. 1888 
261 Northampton Co. 1808 
311 Hertford Co 1837 

74 Bertie Co 1911 

418 Bertie Co 1803- 

220 Northampton Co. 1854 

97 Northampton Co. 1885 

70 Bertie Co 1878 

253 Northampton Co. 1848 

842 Bertie Co 1804 

356 Bertie Co 1750 

95 Northampton Co.l889 
112 Bertie Co 1885 

150 Northampton Co.l896 

172 Hertford Co 1883 

155 Hertford Co 1885 

166|Hertford Co 1873- 

154 1 Northampton Co. 1902 

11833] 



* The letter of Cashie never reached the Clerk. 



22 



Minutes of the 
CHURCH STATISTICS— Continued. 



CHURCHES. 



PASTORS. 



CLERKS AND POSTOPFICES 



OJ O 0) 



Ahoskie 

Aulander 

Ashley's Grove. 

Bethlehem 

Bethany 

Brantley's Grove 

Buckhorn 

Capehart's 

Cashie 

Center Grove... 

Chowan 

Christian Harbor 

Coleraine 

Connaritsa 

Creeksville 

XDonway 

Elam 

Galatia 

Green's X Roads 
Harrellsville . . .. 

Hebron 

Hillside 

Holly Grove 

Holly Springs. . . 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Lawrence's 

Lewiston 

Margarettsville . 

Mars Hill 

Meherrin 

Mount Carmel. .. 
Mount Tabor. . . . 
Murfreesboro ... 

Menola 

Merry Hill 

Oak Grove 

Pine Forest 

Potecasi 

Pleasant Grove.. 
Powellsville .... 

Republican 

Rich Square 

Roanoke 

Roquist 

Robert's Chapel. 

Ross's 

Sandy Run 

Seaboard 

Siloam 

Severn 

St. John's 

Union 

Winton 

Woodland 



C. L. Dowell 

R. L. Gay 

D. Cale 

C. L. Dowell 

J. O. Alderman. 
H. F. Brinson. . 
J. H. Poteat.... 
T. T. Speight. . . 

Q. C. Davis 

S. B. Barnes. . . . 

D. P. Harris 

J. A. Speight... 

J. O. Alderman. 

J. E. Hovle 

D. Cale 

W. B. Waff 

J. A. Speight... 

D. Cale 

,T. T. Speight. .. 
!c. p. Scott 

C. W.Scarborough 

Q. C. Davis 

H. F. Brinson.. 
H. F. Brinson.. 

L. A. Parker 

J. F. Cale 

D. Cale 

S. B. Barnes. . . . 

J. F. Cale 

W. B. Waff 

T. T. Speight. . . 

C. P. Scott 

L. A. Parker 

A. T. Howell 

A. T. Howell 

C. W. Scarborough 

S. B. Barnes 

C. L. Dowell 

J. A. Speight. ... 

L. A. Parker 

C.W.Scarborough 

C. P. Scott 

T. T. Speight. . .. 
J. F. Cale 

D. Cale 

Q. C. Davis 

J. H. Poteat 

J. A. Speight 

J. F. Cale 

L. A. Parker. . . . 
H. F. Brinson. . . 
W. B. Waff..... 

D. Cale 

D. P. Harris 

T. L. Brown 

C.W.Scarborough 



T. E. Browne, Ahoskie. 

W. H. Mitchell, Aulander 

J. K. Revel, Conway 

R. J. Hoggard, Cofield 

E. E. Daniel, Coleraine 

B. F. Barham, Ahoskie 

H. J. Vann, Como 

H. J. Ward, Merry Hill 

W. R. Cobb, Windsor 

C. S. Godwin, Ahoskie 

T. D. Boone, Winton 

J. H. Evans, Harrellsville 

H. E. Wilson, Coleraine 

J. P. Slade, Aulander 

W. H. Davis, Conway 

J. F. Martin, Conway 

J. E. Daniel, Pleasant Hill 

W. C. Smith. Seaboard 

G. W. Castellow, Windsor 

D. Taylor, Harrellsville 

H. T. Vann, Woodland 

D. E. White, Cahaba...' 

M. R. Barnes, Cremo 

J. R. Wilder, Tunis 

Edwin Wright, Jackson 

C. L. L. Cobb, Kelford 

R. C. Lassiter, Lasker 

John M. Britt, Merry Hill 

J. J. Peele, Lewiston 

Jord. Edwards, Margarettsville 

W. B. Miller, Coleraine 

J. J. Parker, Murfreesboro.... 
J. G. Joyner, Seaboard 

D. L. Parker, Winton 

J. D. Babb, Murfreesboro 

E. C. Parker, Woodland 

D. M. Britt, Merry Hill 

S. E. Marsh, Aulander 

J. R. Carstarphen. Garysburg., 

E. B. Lassiter, Potecasi 

Miles Hughes, Annel ta 

M. S. Raynor, Powellsville 

A. V. Cobb, Windsor 

Horace Lassiter, Rich Square. . 

R. J. Burnett, Rich Square 

J. M. Yates, Windsor 7'. ... 

W. J. Beale, Pendleton 

J. T. Hoggard, Windsor 

Paul Jilcott, Roxobel 

J. R. Long, Seaboard 

L. H. Speller, Windsor 

W. H. Howell, Severn 

E. W. Raggett, Ahoskie 

John Freeman, Ahoskie 

J. A. Clark, Winton 

Lewter McDaniel, Woodland...! 



4500.00 
2500.00 
3000.00 
1200.00 
1500.00 
6000.00 
1000.00 



1000.00 



1500.00 
6000.00 
2000.00 
1500.00 
3500.00 
1000.00 



700.00 
2000.00 



600.00 
1200.00 
1200.00 
3000.00 
2500.00 
8000.00 
1500.00 



1000.00 
3000.00 
1500.00 

'2006'. do 



800.00 



1000.00 
2000.00 



2300.00 
1000.00 



1500.00 
500.00 
2000.00 
3000.00 
3000.00 
1000.00 
1000.00 
2000.00 
1500.00 
1500.00 



1600.00 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL STATISTICS. 



23 



CHtTRCHES. 



OH 



SUPERINTENDENTS AND 
POSTOFFICES. 



Ahoskie 

Aulander 

Ashley's Grove. . . 

Bethlehem 

Bethany 

Brantle's Grove. , 

Buekhorn 

Capehart's 

Cashie 

Center Grove 

Chowan 

Christian Harbor. 

Coleraine 

Connaritsa 

Creeksville 

Conway , 

Elam 

Galatia 

Greens X Roads. 
Harrellsville . . . . . 

Hebron , 

Hillside 

Holly Grove 

Holly Springs 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Lawrence's 

Lewiston 

Margarettsville . 

Mars Hill 

Meherrin 

Mount Carmel. . . 
Mount Tabor .... 
Murfreesboro . . . 

Menola 

Merry Hill 

Oak Grove 

Pine Forest 

Potecasi 

Pleasant Grove. . 
Powellsville . . . . 

Republican 

Rich Square 

Roanoke 

Roquist 

Robert's Chapel. 

Ross's 

Sandy Run 

Seaboard 

Siloam 

Severn 

St. John's 

Union 

"Winton 

iVoodland 



10 



10 



200 
175 
76 
63 
107 
142 
85 
77 



73 
75 
74 

145 
61 

124 



131 
91 

106 
51 
75 



71 
75 
45 
172 
144 
120 
160 
63 
254 
62 
79 
81 
110 
67 
69 
50 



132 
47 
97 
75 

1.50 
72 



Total 573 1 5413 1^1 



80 
456 
169 

55 

35 
134 

70 
109 

74 
105 



212 
184 
86 
69 
116 
152 
94 
83 



139 
101 
114 
57 

85 



84 
56 
190 
154 
136 
174 
71 
279 
75 
88 
94 
130 
74 
76 
59 



145 
54 

104 
85 

159 
79 



30 

137 
50 
90 

148 
50 



15 



53 



50 



45 
112 



50 
38 
90 
30 
89 

ioo 



99 
500 
179 

62 

41 
154 

'78 
120 

84 
113 



102 



137 



432 
260 
100 
130 
224 
137 

'so 



110 
80 
110 
115 
66 
55 
175 
150 
11] 



75 
337 

90, 
250 1 
125 

90 
321 

80 
204 
150 
103 
197 
200 

80 

35 
100 



185 
126 
125 
165 
200 



160 
'35 



192 
280 
279 
80 
48 
220 



170 
110 
160 



12 



155 W 
140 E. 

65|C. 



L. Curtis, Ahoskie.^ 
C. Harrell, Aulander. b* 
R. Revel, Conway. 
J. Hoggard, Cofield. 
J. M. Perry, Coleraine. 
P. D. Parker, Ahoskie. 
R. A. Majette, Como. 
H. J. Ward, Merry Hill. 



C. S. Godwin, Ahoskie. 
J. E. Vann, Winton. W 
N. S. Hoggard, Harrellsville. 
E. T. Forehand, Coleraine. u 
J. S. Jenkins, Aulander. 
Edwin Lassiter, Conway. 

A. Lassiter, Conway. 

C. L. Stephenson, Gumberry. 
J. W. Rose, Margarettsville. 
G. T. Mizelle. Windsor. 

B. F. Williams, Harrellsville. 
J. P. Griffin, Woodland. 



48 
40 
40 

115 
95 
30 

120 
42 

140 

■59 

64 
94 
50 
40 
20 



87 
30 
66 
60 
121 75 
12 1 50 

3 
12 



75 
300 
90 
30 
20 
86 
50 
60 
52 
70 



J. J. Taylor, Cremo. 

J. D. Perry, Cofield. 

P. J. Long, Jackson. 

J. E. Tyler, Kelford. 

W. R. Bridgers, Lasker. 

J. W. Cullipher, Merry Hill.^ 

W. J. Barnes, Lewiston. 

J. D. Overby, Margarettsville. 

Erastus Harrell, Coleraine. 

J. K. Parker, Murfreesboro. 



J. W. Boone, Winton. 

J. B. Barnacasal, Murfreesboro ' 

H. W. Griffith, Woodland. 

John Keeter, Avoca. 

W. E. Saunders, Aulander. 



C. G. Powell, Potecasi. W 

J. S. Hughes, Annetta. 

W. C. Mathews, Powellsville. 

A. V. Cobb, Windsor. \^ 

Willie Edwards, Rich Square, is*. 

W. J. Lassiter, Lasker. 

G. D. Leggett, Windsor. 

J. E. Johnson, Pendleton. 

Worley Cowan, Windsor, ik* 

C. C. Tyler, Roxobel. fc* 

J. T. Long, Seaboard. 

E. Leggett, Windsor. 

G. H. Tyler, Severn, i-- 

R. L. Edwards, Aulander. t.. 

W. A. Miller, Ahoskie. 

I. V. Turner, Winton. 

C. H. Griffin, Woodland.*^ 



|....|....|....| 



24 



Minutes of the 

CHURCH EXPENSES. 



CHURCHES. 



Aulaiider 

Ashley's Grove. . . 

Bethlehem 

Bethany 

Brantley's Grove. 

Biickhorn 

Capehart's 

Cashie 

Center Grove. . . . 

Chowan 

Christian Harbor. 

Coleraine 

Connaritsa 

Creeksviile ...... 

Conway 

Elam 

Galatia 

Green's X Roads. 

Harrellsville 

Hebron 

Hillside 

Holly Grove 

Holly Springs. . . . 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Lawrence's 

Lewiston 

Margarettsville . . 

Mars Hill 

Meherrin 

Moniit Carmel . . . 
Monnt Tabor .... 
Mnrfreesboro .... 

Menola 

Merrv Hill 

Oak Grove 

Pine Forest 

Potecasi 

Pleasant Grove. . . 

Powellsville 

Republican 

Rich Square , 

Roanoke 

Roquist 

Robert's Chapel. . . 

Ross's 

Sandy Run 

Seaboard 

Siloam 

Severn 

St. John's 

Union 

"Winton 

Woodland 



o >^ 



Ahoskie $ 450. 00 

1000.00 
12.J.0O 
825.00 
175.00 
150.00 
500.00 
2.7!) . 00 



82.48 
134.70 



48.00 
15.00 
26.50 
58.4.3 
21.00 



P j$66.37 

6.3.. 37 1 15.00 
1500.00 



28.00 
5000 . 00 
35.00 



Total 



175.0;; 
(')no.();) 
175. «H) 
451 ».(»() 
20!). 00 
125 . 00 
200.00 
200.00 
175.00 
200.00 
250.00 
200.00 
100 . 00 
200.0 

65 . 00 
200 . 00 
200.00 
125.00 
215.00 
2.50.00 
150.00 
225.00 
400.00 
200 . 00 
450.00 
400.00 
200 . 00 
150.00 
1.50.00 
100.00 
225.00 
200. 00 1 
225.001 
200.00 
225.00 
1.50.00 

75.00 
875.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
100.00 
525.00 
150.00 
400.00 
3.50.00 
200.001 



23.001 
70.001 

■m 

205.841 
18 . 00 
.54.29 
20.00 
24.00 
31.251 
73.. 50 1 
5.001 
0.00 1 
.30.051 



12.00 
93.75 
11.05 
2179.55 



18.15 



69.07 



9.32 



10.00 
5.00 
6.13 
25.00 
351 20.12 

I 10.00 

29| 7.09 
18.(X)| 10.07 
88.001 .30.00 
7.251 19.15 
I 



60.001 

63.. 57 1. 

27. (X) I. 

.37.001. 

13.251 

20. 00 1 . 

26.651 . 

56.101. 

20.001 . 
103.661 
176.171 



200.00 
465.00 



I 14.09 



82.50 



360.01 



13.90 
42.25 



42.00 
38.83 
104.05 
20.00 
1.00 
14.00 
19.851, 



3500.00 
1404.96 
59.84 



5.00 
39.80 
2000.00 



$ 3.00 
2.00 



2.. 50 
2.00 
3.00 
2.00 
2.50 
2.50 
2.00 
2.00 
1..50 
3.15 
2.50 
1.50 
2.50 
1..50 
2.25 
1.501 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
2.50 
1.50 



.$ 62.90 
29.72 



15.00 



12.00i 
15.80 
10.00 
15.03 



14.47 
6.82 



10.00 



48.60 
60.95 



35.00 
1.00 
92.03 
15.00 
78.00 
50.00 
78.52 



3.65 



5.00 



10.00 



86.00 



5.00 
17.90 



53.14 
50.00 



22.89 
48.75 



12.06 



l.,50 
1.25 
2.00 
3.001 
1.00 
1.80 
2.. 50 
1.-50 
2.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.30 
1.00 
50 
1.50 
2.50 
1.50 
3.00 
2.00 
1.40 



3.00 
4.00 
3.00 



15.00 



,10 



1.00 
2.50 
1.20 
3.00 
2.00 
2.00 



10.00 
5.00 
52.67 
46.. 37 
6.50 



43.63 
24 92 
69.38 
10.50 

5.00 
37.00 
59.69 

9.00 
18.131 



40.00 



23.28 

"45 .'36 

34.00 
22.15 
64.88 
48.78 



34.50 
28.75 
28.78 
36.46 



8. 
24.70 
20.00 



42.00 
7.73 
13.96 
15.94 
80.00 
28.56 



24.84 
25.25 
41.72 
12.00 
1.50 
36.57 



30.00 
29.50 
39.92 



13705.001 2392. 00 1 17268. 47 1 567. 52 1 105. 35 1 1369.54] 35404.38 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 25 



FINANCIAL TABLE— SUNDAY SCHOOL. 



CHURCHES. 


02 

"S =^ 


Home 
Missions. 


~l C 
^§ 


•A 


Orphanage. 

Associational 
Missions. 


Otlier 
Objects. 

. 1 


Total. 




$ 




$ 


$ 


$ 147 43 




$ 


$ 147 43 
111^70 
26.77 
11." 01 
3.44 


Aulander 


8.34 
12.42 
3.67 


8.34 
7.20 
3.67 


3.10 
7.15 
3.67 




89.62 




2.30 


















Bethany 


2.27 


1.17 






Brantley's Grove 






















84.20 






84.20 


Capehart's 














Cashie 


















•Center Grove 










60.00 
120.00 
20.71 
37.63 






60.00 
137.02 
34.64 
54.63 










12.02 
5.10 
2.50 


5.00 
1.68 






Christian Harbor 


2.00 
12.00 


2.00 
2.50 




3.10 


'Coleraine 




Connaritsa 








-tTreelJSville 




























60.00 
121 .59 






60.00 
133 14 


Elapi 








2.10 




9.45 












Green's X Roads 










3.50 
30 00 

3o!oo 






3.50 
30 00 
30 '.00 


Harrellsville 














Hebron 














Hillside 














Hollv Grove 


.5.00 






5.76 


5.00 




4.00 


19.76 


-Holly Springs 








Jackson 










38 49 
71^84 
30.92 






38 49 
77^36 
30.92 


Kelford 







5.52 




Lasker 


1 




















Lewiston 










63 .00 
12 00 
50 .'46 
10.00 
30!68 




2 34 


6.5 34 
12 00 
65^89 
10 .00 
39 94 
5b! 84 
51 . 40 
36.00 


Margarettsville 












Mars Hill 


6.00 


5.00 




4.43 






Meherrin 








Jklount Carmel 


4.76 






4.50 
50.84 






Mount Tabor 










Murfreesboro 


9.74 






.30.80 
36.00 




10.86 


Menola 











Merry Hill 














'Oak Grove 








































10.75 




49.35 




10.00 


75.10 


Pleasant Grove 








Powellsville 











22.. 50 
16.00 
60.00 






22.50 
.37.00 
60.00 




5.00 


4.00 




4.00 


4.00 




4.00 


l^ich Square 


















Roquist 


















12.48 


11.26 


17.68 




83.66 






124.42 


Ross's 








Sandy Run 










60.85 






60.85 


Seaboard 














Siloam 


















Severn 










85.64 




5.00 


90.64 


St. John's 












Union 
















Winton 


7.83 









12.00 
30.85 






19.83 
67.12 


Woodland 


6.27 












30.66 


Total .TTT 


86.741 .5''. 74 


71.491 80.68 


1605.28 


1 62.201 1979.13 



26 Mimites of the, 



FINANCIAL TABLE— MISSIONARY SOCIETIES AND SUNBEAMS. 



CHURCHES. 


MISSIONARY SOCIETIES. 


SUNBEAMS. 




a 
I) .2 


u m 


6 
bi) 

h 

o 


w 
o 

oo 


+-> 

H 


a 



a 
<i^.2 

W§ 


■^.2 

u 02 


0) 0) 

00 


+-> 



EH 




$41.75 
36.75 
12.42 


$37.35 
28.00 
7.20 


$61.48 
104.25 
7.15 




$15.00 


$155.58 
169.00 
26.77 


$ 3.12 
1.50 


$ 


$ 6.30 
4.50 


$ 3.00 


$ 12.42 
6.00 






Ashley's Grove. . 






















i :::::: 






















Brantley's Grove 
Buckhorn 






















37.00 
6.58 


29.10 
17.00 


26.90 
10.00 






93.00 6.14 


5.92 


8.70 


1.58 


22.34 








33.58 










































Chowan 

Christian Harbor 
Coleraine « 


50.00 


72.50 


31.00 


6.00 


10.00 


169.50 20.00 


26.50 


15.00 


24.00 


85.50 


20.75 


15.00 


26.00 


14.87 


5.50 


82.121 3.66 
! 


4.62 


5.00 


6.111 18.73 








1 
















Conway 


7.00 


5.951 4.001 




16.95 




20 






20 






































Green's X Roads 
Harrellsville .... 
Hebron 






















i6.45 
24.01 


4 16 60 




5.25 
3.35 


36.45 
38.71 








14.85 


14.85 
11.39 




1 1 . 35 





4.39 


3.50 


3.50 






1 




Holly Grove 


12.50 


5.30 


9.40 





2.50 


29.70 


1.94 


1.16 


1.00 




4.10 












6.85 
7.00 
4.00 


5.501 




12., 35 
,30.50 
13.00 
11.20 
29.45 


' *6.'66 
1.00 


' '6. '66 
1.00 


3.00 
5.00 
1.00 




3.00 
21.21 
3.00 


Kelford 




12.00 
2.00 
2.20 
7.90 


10.00 
7.00 
9.00 
8.00 




1.50 


4.21 


Lawrence's 








Lewiston 


13.55 


















Margarettsville . 


1 
















Meherrin 


4.00 
7.00 
50.20 
11.63 


5.551 1.95| 5.55 
7.251 6.681 


■ "6. '35 




13.05 
24.28 
20.00 
140.07 
,53.25 
19.49 


" '2. "56 




' 'i.'35 




.' .' . . . . 




" 3]9i 


Mount Carmel. . . 
Mount Tabor.... 
Murfreesboro . . . 


6.00 
55.62 
19.21 

5.. 35 


7.00 






.34.25 
20.63 
14.14 


: : : : : 


' '2. '38 


3.96 


:::::: 




2.32 




1.11 





7.59 



3 43 






1 















1 
























1 




















2i.75 
2.75 
8.00 
5.15 




19.62 
4.. 30 


6.201.36.00 
11 .,301 


10.70 
1.25 
20 . 77 



94.27 
19.60 
,35.87 
,30.83 
20.00 





3.17 




5.88 




9.05.- 


Pleasant Grove. . 
Republican 




4.101 3.00 
11 .951 13.73 






5.00 

1.09 









5.00 
8.28- 


Rich Square 




5.59 


1.60 














1 

















Roberts's Chapel 


90.801 5.00 

1 


2.00 










97.80 



























Sandy Run 


12.35 


3.00 


3.151 


3.25 



21.75 




1.79 


2.05 




1.551 




5.39- 


Spabonrrl .... 


1 ! 






1 1 

















Severn 


5.90 


3.051 7.931 


6. (to 



22 . 88 


63 


1.16 




1.00] 




2.79' 


St. .Tnhn's 




TTnion 1 


1 


120 . 00 
12.65 
,30.00 


120.00 
82.65 
73.47 









12.001 12.00 


Winton 


20.00 
9.32 


2?; 001 25 .00 











Woodland 


27.15 
475.10 


7.00 




9.48 






2.761 




12.24 


Total 1531.36 


51 1 . 60 1 62 . 42 1 258 . 4 5 1 1 838 . 93 


71.601 67.971 66.901 65.75 


272.22 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 27 

S^££^^ij;^BLE--C^^ ALL DEPARTMENTS. 




Connaritsa 
Creeksville 
Conway 
Elam 
Galatia 

Green's X Roads 

Harrellsville . . . 

Hebron . . . 

Hillside ... 

Holly Grove. 

Holly Spring 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Lawrence 

Lewiston 

Margarettsville 

Mars Hill 

Meherrin 

Mount Carmel 

Mount Tabor. . 

Murfreesboro .... 
^enola 15 .'oo 

Merry Hill 12.50 

Oak Grove 18.00 

Pine Forest. 

Potecasi . . . 

Pleasant Grove 

Powellsville , xo.ou 

Republican 43.00 

Rich Square 41 '?4 

e^anoke 10 .00 

;5oquist 7 00 

Robert's Chapel 88.28 

60.00 

bandy Run 44 14 

Seaboard 22 

Siloam .... ■ ■ ' ■ - 

Union 

IWinton ... * ' ' I 45 
Woodland ' ' ' ' ' 



_TotaI_^^^_^^487 : 37| 



:28 



Minutes of the 



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) 00 GO 00 00 



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o 

<D O "t^'^ 

I'd C! W M 

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P £ O 5 ; 

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12; 



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West Chowan Baptist Association. 



29? 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS— WOMAN'S MISSIONARY 

SOCIETIES. 



NAME OF CHURCH. 



No. of i 


Amount 


Rate per 


Members. 


Contributed 


Member. 


24 


$ 128.37 


$ 5.35 


21 


97.40 


4.64 


38 


169.51 


4.46 


62 


273.00 


4.40 


34 


149 . 30 


4.39 


21 


89.98 


4.28 


16 


55.31 


3.45 


28 


95 . 17 


3.40 


16 


51.50 


3.22 


50 


156.30 


3.13- 


33 


83.60 


2.53 


7 


17.25 


2.46 


23 


54.51 


2.37 


52 


102.61 


1.97 


27 


35.16 


1.30 


28 


35.18 


1.26 


17 


20.85 


1 .22 


20 


23 . 55 


l!l8 


21 


20.87 


99 


37 


29.45 


80 


43 


30.35 


7 


41 


27.32 


67 


18 


11.90 


66 


44 


27.95 


64 


25 


13.05 


52 


38 


18.75 


49 


55 


25.35 


47 


41 


19.18 


47 


18 


6.00 


33 


50 


11.15 


22 


28 


6.05 


22 


39 


5.00 


13 



Coleraine 

Winton 

Chowan 

Ahoskie 

Union 

Potecasi 

Harrellsville . . . . 

Buekhorn 

Kelford 

Aulander 

"Woodland 

Jackson 

Murf reesboro . . . 

Mount Tabor 

Hebron 

Rich Square 

Conway 

Severn 

Menola 

Lewiston 

Pleasant Grove.. 
Ashley Grove.... 

Sandy Run 

Holly Grove 

Mars Hill 

Cashie 

Roanoke 

Mount Carmel... 

Seaboard 

Robert's Chapel. 

Merry Hill 

Lasker 



Total 



1015 I $1890.92 I 



SUMMARY. 
Number of Societies reporting.... 32 

Total number of members 1015 

Total amount contributed $1890.72 

Largest amt. contributed(Ahoskie) 273.00 



Largest No. of members (Ahoskie) 62 
Largest rate per mem. (Coleraine)$ 5.35-. 
Total rate per member $ 1.86 



SUNBEAM BANDS. 



NAME OF CHURCH. 



No. of 
Members. 


Amount 
Contributed 


Rate per 
Member. 


45 


$ 86.00 


$ 1.91 


20 


26.51 


1.32 


26 


15.64 


60 


26 


15.00 


58 


23 


12.46 


54 


44 


23.41 


53 


28 


14.53 


52 


50 


21.25 


43 


35 


. 13.91 


40 


31 


• 9.85 


32 


22 


6.95 


32 


30 


7.. 37 


25 


66 


13.75 


20 


14 


2.64 


19 


30 


4.49 


15 


42 


5.04 


12 


34 


3.49 


10 


24 


94 


4 


8 


15 


2 


598 


$283.38 


i 



Chowan .... 

Winton 

Coleraine . . . 

Union 

Rich Square. 
Buekhorn . . . 
Harrellsville 

Kelford 

Mount Tabor 

Hebron 

Potecasi .... 
Woodland . . 

Ahoskie 

Severn 

Holly Grove. 
Sandy Run.. 

Menola 

Lewiston .... 
Seaboard . . . 
Total 



SUMMARY. 



Number of Bands reporting 19 

Total number of members 598 

Total amount contributed $ 283.38 

Total rate per member $ 47 



Largest No. of members (Ahoskie) 66- 
Largest amt. contributed(Chowan)$ 86.00 
Largest rate per member(Chowan)$ 1.81 



30 



Minutes of the 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION OF THE 
WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 

At the Baptist Church of Woodland, N. C, July 26, 1911, the 17th annual 
session of the Woman's Missionary Union of the West Chowan Association, 
was called to order by its President, Mrs. Clifton G. Parker. The congre- 
gation sang, "All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name," and Mrs. T. H. Bridgers, 
of Lewiston, read the 55th chapter of Isaiah, and Mrs. C. W. Scarborough led 
in a tender appeal to our Heavenly Father. At the close of the song, "My 
faith looks up to Thee," Mrs. W. P. Benthall, of Woodland, in behalf of the 
Missionary Society, and Miss Elsie Benthall, in behalf of the Sunbeams, 
made addresses of such cordial welcome that the Union felt at home in 
Woodland in the beginning. As mouthpieces of the Union, Mrs. C. F. Griffin, 
Misses Genevieve Taylor and Helen Turner, all of Winton, in excellently ex- 
pressed language, thanked Woodland for her gracious welcome. 

A song was sung and the minutes read and approved. 

Roll was called and delegates recognized. 

On an approved motion, Mrs. W. A. Miller, of Union, and Mrs. J. P. Griffin, 
of Hebron, were appointed statisticians, to give a condensed report of all 
letters. 

As there was no old business the President called for new business. 

The matter of better financing the Union was discussed and the following 
motion made by Miss Lizzie Pritchard, of Aulander. Hereafter in the month 
of February, a collection shall be taken by all the Societies as an expense 
fund for the Union, the money to be sent directly to the treasurer. The 
motion was unanimously carried. 

On motion of Mrs. Scarborough, the Constitution will be type written and 
a copy sent to each Society. 

The President reported that we had gained, during the year, one W. M, 
Society and four Y. W. Auxiliaries. The amount contributed to the annual 
meeting of the State, exceeded our pledge. The statement was especially 
pleasing to the Union. With earnest insistence, Mrs. Parker urged enlarge- 
ment of the work in all its branches. 

After the Treasurer's report and a hymn sung, Miss Willie Lambertson, 
of Rich Square, in "Comparing the W. M. U. of the S. B. C. to the W. M. U. y 
of N. C", gave us a paper that showed deep study and comprehensive thought 
in the skillful way she handled her subject. "Labor On," was sung by the 
congregation, and the discussion "Who is my Neighbor?" was given. Mrs. 
E. B. Lassiter, of Potecasi, pleading for the foreign field, called for many 
more bearers of the Light to those who sit in darkness. 

Miss Mattie Sykes, of Conway, told us of the different phases of the work 
done by our Home Board, clearly defining the especial needs in our home 
land. Miss Mary Harrell, of Woodland, emphasized the work of the church 
of God in our own State. 

After appointing the Committees, the President invited any one from other 
Associations to join in our exercises. Miss Margaret Tweedy, of Norfolk, 
Va., responded. 

Mrs. Scarborough gave a hearty invitation to dinner and the morning 
session came to a close with an earnest prayer by the President. 



AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The cordiality and generosity of Woodland was cleverly expressed in the 
bountiful dinner spread for her guests. After partaking of the excellent 
food and then mingling in pleasant intercourse with one another, we felt 
we had already had our social hour. 

The afternoon session began with devotional exercises conducted by Mrs. 
H. G. Snipes, of Menola, who read the 116th Psalm and led in prayer. She 
then made a sweet and touching plea to render ourselves to God for all His 
benefits to us. 

Mrs. J. D. Burner, Of Chowan College, in a scholarly thesis, "A Funda- 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



'61 



mental Need," showed that the need to-day is more spiritual development. A 
heart filled with spirituality will have all other things added. 

After singing, "Take time to be holy," Miss Margaret Tweedy in a quiet, 
unobtrusive manner gave the Union a talk on City Missions. As gently as 
the dews from Heaven, she filled our minds with the great needs of the 
slums of the cities. From personal experience, she told of work in Louisville, 
Ky., and Norfolk, Va. After listening to her we wished we could adopt this 
gentle woman as one of us. At the close of Miss Tweedy's address, "I gave 
my life for thee" was fittingly sung. 

The reputation of Mrs. P. H. Taylor of Chowan Church, as a successful 
Sunbeam leader, has gone throughout our Union, and we were convinced 
that she wears her honor deservedly, while listening to her excellent paper, 
"The Best Feature in My Sunbeam Society." 

Tithing slips were distributed while singing "Rescue the Perishing." 

Mrs. J. B. Bruner gave an interesting talk on "How to place Missionary 
Societies on a firm basis." Her plan is to give each member some work 
to do. 

The Union was greatly benefitted by the round table discussion, "How 
my Society grew, and what made it grow." The reports showed growth 
in members, money and spiritual life. 

The report of the committee on statistics told that the W. M. S., of Cole- 
raine, leads the Union in finance, giving $5.34 per member, and Chowan Sun- 
beams lead, giving $1.98 per member. Winton Baptist Church has second 
place in both W. M. S. and Sunbeam Band. 

On motion, the report was adopted and will be printed in the Minutes 
of the West 'Chowan Association. 

The Committee on Time and Place gave the following: 

Lewiston, N. C, Wednesday after the fourth Sunday in July, 1912. 

MISS WILLIE LAMb]eRTSON, 
MRS. T. E. BRUNER, 
MRS. T. H. BRIDGERS, 

Committee. 

The report was adopted. 

The committee on Nominations made the following report: 

The Committee on Nominations beg to submit the following names: 

For President, the present incumbent, Mrs. Clifton G. Parker. 

For Vice-President, Mrs. John Freeman. 

For Secretary and Treasurer, Miss Willie Lambertson. 

MRS. P. H. TAYLOR, 
MRS. E. F. COOK. 
MISS MAMIE JENKINS, 

Committee. 

After the adoption of this report the Committee on Obituaries submitted 
the following: 

Tiding from the Societies of the West Chowan Association — bring the 
names of the following noble and consecrated sisters, whom, our Heavenly 
Father in His infinite wisdom and love, has seen fit to call from life's labor 
of love to that home which He, Himself, has gone to prepare for His own. 

From Kelford, Mrs. W. C. Evans; Woodland, Mrs. Charles Griffin; Pleasant 
Grove, TVIrs. Joseph Odom; Conway, Mrs. Fannie Boone; Robert's Chapel, 
Miss Rosseau Edwards and Mrs. D. N. Stephenson. 

Besides these beloved ones, who are so much missed, both in our Mis- 
sionary Union and in their respective home Societies, there are others now 
who have entered into their eternal reward. With heavy hearts we submis- 
sively bow to the will of "Him, who is too wise to err and too good to be 
"After the toil and trouble. 

There comes a day of rest; 
After the weary confiict. 

Peace on the Savior's breast; 



82 



Minnies of the West Chowan Baptist Association. 



After the care and sorrow, 

The glory of light and love; 
After the wilderness journey, 

The Father's bright home above. 
After the night of darkness 

The shadows all flee away; 
After the day of sadness 

Hope sheds her bright ray; 
After the strife and struggle 

The victory is won; 
After the work is over 

The Master own words^ "Well done." 
Respectfully submitted, 

MISS ELIZABETH PRITCHARD, 
MRS. IDA BROWNE, 
MISS M. I. SYKES, 
MRS. MARY C. DILDAY, 
This report was adopted. , Committee. 

After the assignment of homes, the Union adjourned with prayer by 
Mrs. Bruner. 



EVENING SESSION. 

At its evening session the Union came to order under the sweet strains 
of music. After two excellently rendered selections by the choir, Rev. C. 
W. Scarborough, pastor of the church, read a few verses of Scripture, and 
Rev. L. A. Parker led in prayer. 

At the close of a beautiful quartette Mr. Scarborough introduced the 
speaker of the evening. Rev. C. W. Blanchard, of Wilson. In his easy, fluent 
style Mr. Blanchard entertained his audience with an address on "The Com- 
ing Task of Nortn Carolina." The Baptists of North Carolina need only the 
development of the wonderful power in them to become the greatest strong- 
hold of the country. Mr. Blanchard showed that the development is hasten- 
ing, and the time will be short when the principles for which we stand will 
triumph in our State. 

After Mr. Blanchard's address Miss Pat Adams, of Monroe, charmed the 
audience with an exquisite solo. 

A collection being taken the following resolutions were read: 

Resolved 1st. That our first tribute to God, who in His infinite love and 
mercy, has permitted us to meet again in this our annual session, July 
26, 1911. 

2nd. That we return a vote of thanks to Woodland, and the surrounding 
community, for their gracious and generous hospitality. 

3rd. To the officers for their faithful and efficient work during the year 
1911. 

4th. To the members of the choir for the excellent music furnished us. 

5th. To our visitors, Miss Tweedy, of Norfolk, "Va., and Rev. C. W. Blanch- 
ard, of Wilson, N. C, for the helpful and instructive speeches they have 
given us to-day. 

6th. To the pastor and his wife for their untiring efforts to entertain the 
Union. 

MISS HELEN BROWN, 
MISS BLANCHE PRITCHARD, 
MRS. D. A. DAY, Committee. 
When this report was adopted, benediction was pronounced by Mr. Blanch- 
ard and a perfectly successful and harmonious session of the Woman's Mis- 
sionary Union, of the West Chowan Association, closed. 

MARY ELIZABETH PARKER, President. 
NETTIE OWEN FREEMAN, Secretary. 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



Thirtieth Annual Session 



OP THE 



West Chowan 



Baptist Association, 



Republican Baptist Church, Bertie Co., N. C , 



October 29th. 30th and 31st, 1912. 



The next session will be held with Severn Ghurch. Northampton County 
beginning on Tuesday after the Fourth Sunday in October. 1913, D. P 
Harris to preach the Introductory Sermon, C. P. Scott, Alternate. 




HELD WITH 



Goldsboro, N. C. 
Nash Brothers, Printers and Binders 
1912 



MINUTES 



OF THE 

Thirtieth Annual Session 

OF THE 

West Chowan 

Baptist Association, 

HELD WITH 

Republican Baptist Church, Bertie Co., N. C, 

October 29th. 30th and 31st, 1912. 



The next session will be held with Severn Church, Northampton County, 
beginning on Tuesday after the Fourth Sunday in October, 1913, D. 
Harris to preach the Introductory Sermon, C. P. Scott, Alternate. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 
Nash Brothers, Printers and Binders 
19 12 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 



Foreign Missions— Q. C. Davis, T. T. Speight W P Shaw 
State Missions— J. P. Cale, S. F. Lee, H. J. Ward. 
Home Missions — T. L. Brown, J. H. Evans E White 
Ministers' Relief— J. H. Matthews, J. L. Jenkins, W * E Miller 
Chowan College— R. P. Thomas, G. T. Whims, J W Boon 
Orphanage— L. A. Parker, C. W. Mitchell, J. H. Stephenson 
Education— W. B. ¥7aff, J. T. Bolton, T. O Joyner 
Sunday Schools— C. W. Scarborough, H. F. Brinson,' S B Barnes 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS. 

Dancy Cale r>^f ■ ^, 

C. L Dowell . . . 

S. B. Barnes . . f^'^!^' ^' 

c. w.sc^horough ::::::::::::::::::::::;Mur..t^S5S:g: 

J. R. Mathews a?,^^Z^^' n 

H. F. Brinson Aulander, N. C. 

Q C Daviq Tunis, N. C. 

R:L:Gay • Murfreesboro, N. C. 

c. P. Scott ::: ^rf'^^^K^^"' ^• 

J. F. Cale Murfreesboro, N. C. 

L. A. Parker "^^^^^ 2' 

John Barnes ^-^^f?^^' ^• 

W B Waff Pendleton, N. C. 

D. 'p.' Harris'. v.". v. w^'y^' J^" 
L. E. Dailey.... Wmton, N. C. 

w. F. Cale -••••w-.^^^^' 

J. W. Downey V.)^ ?' 

Pastors, but not residing in "iheAssociaWon: Woodland, N. C. 

J. A. Speight c. 

J. O. Alderman ^J^'^^T'^' S' 

T. L. Brown 

Gatesville, N. C. 



OFFICERS: 

T. Gilliam, Moderator , 

J. s^ Mitchell, Vice-Moderator: • "^-nfon - 

N. W. Britton, Clerk, Wmton, 



R. P. Thomas,^ Treasurer. V.V.V. • TfZ 

Q. C. Davis, Historian V ' S' ?: 

The Officers constitute the Executive Commitiee' of tie YsS^on.' 



CONSTITUTION. 



Name. 

Article 1. This body shall be known as the North Carolina West Chowan 
Baptist Association. 

Membership. 

Art. 2. It shall be composed of messengers elected by the churches con- 
nected with this body, and all ordained ministers who are members or pas- 
tors of said churches, together with the officers of this Association, and 
chairmen of all standing Committees. Each church of one hundred members 
and under shall be entitled to two messengers, and for each additional one 
hundred members, an additional messenger: Provided, That no church shall 
have more than four messengers. 

Objects. 

Art. 3. The objects shall be to devise and recommend measures for increas- 
ing the harmony, the intelligence and the spiritual power of the churches, 
and for developing and directing their energies, their resources and their 
gifts, in advancing the Redeemer's kingdom in the earth. 

Powers and Prerogatives. 

Art. 4. The Association shall have no power to infringe upon the sov- 
ereignty or rights of the churches. It is neither an ecclesiastical nor legisla- 
tive council, nor court of appeal. It may advise the churches and recommend 
measures of usefulness for their adoption, but can not bind them in any way. 
Yet, in view of the combined wisdom, piety and intelligence of the body, it 
may justly claim for itself, for its objects and for its recommendations the 
very highest consideration and regard. 

Art. 5. The Association may dissolve connection with any church that 
becomes heterodox in doctrine, or disorderly in practice, or that fails to 
represent itself, either by messenger or letter, more than two successive 
sessions, without sufficient reasons, or that treats with contempt its objects 
and requirements, or upon application of a church for dismission. 

, Rights of the Churches. 

Art. 6. Each individual church shall hold and exercise all the functions 
of an independent church of Jesus Christ. As constituent members of this 
Association, the churches shall have right to advise, when desired, in case 
of difficulty, and to suggest plans of usefulness to be adopted. It shall be 
the undisputed privilege of any church to withdraw its membership from 
this Association whenever it shall so elect. 

Duties of the Churches. 

Art. 7. It shall be' the duty of the churches to appoint as messengers, as 
far as practicable, their most capable members, to require their attendance, 
and to send by them a contribution to the Association fund to pay for print- 
ing the minutes and other necessary expenses. 

Art. 8. It shall be the duty of each church to send an annual letter to the 
Association, giving: (1) Locality; (2) the names of its pastor and clerk and 
their respective postoffices, (3) the Sabbaths of regular service; (4) the 
church statistics, including the number baptized, received by letter, restored, 
dismissed, deceased, expelled, and aggregate membership, male and female; 
(5) Sabbath School statistics; (6) amount contributed to benevolent objects 
and the Association Fund; (7) names of messengers and alternates; (8) any 
other information deemed of special importance. 

Organization. 

Art. 9. The officers of this Association shall be a Mioderator, Vice-Modera- 
tor, Clerk, Treasurer, and Historian, who shall be elected at each annual 
session, from the members of the Association, and shall continue in office 
until the next annual election, which election shall be the next order of 



Constitution, 



5 



business after tlie enrollment of messengers. As soon as the new ofla-cers 
shall have taken their seats, the body shall be declared organized and pre- 
pared for business. 

Duties of Officers. 

Art. 10. It shall be the duty of the Moderator to open the meetings punc- 
tually at time appointed; to enforce the rules; to preserve order, and to 
exercise all the prerogatives of a presiding officer, according to the principles 
of parliamentary usage. 

Art. 11. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Moderator to discharge the duties 
of the Moderator in his absence. 

Art. 12. It shall be the duty of the Qlerk to keep a faithful record of the 
proceedings of the body, and superintend the printing and distribution of 
same, and to keep on file the printed Minutes and other important documents 
belonging to the body. He may appoint an assistant when necessary. 

Art. 13. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive and disburse the 
money contributed to the Minute Fund, as directed by the body, and make 
an annual report of same. # 

Art. 14. It shall be the duty of the Historian, who shall be elected at 
each annual meeting of the body, to prepare for publication in the Minutes 
an historical sketch of the church with which the Association meets with 
obituaries, incidents, and other facts of the year, that sould be preserved ; 
and make report to the next Association. 

Art. 15. This Constitution may be altered at any annual session of the 
body by a vote of two-thirds of the members present. 

Resolved, 1. That no church shall be entitled to representation in this body 
unless in perfect accord with the Constitution thereof, that fact to be ascer- 
tained by a committee of five on credentials, appointed at each session of 
the body immediately after organization. 

2. The report of this committee shall be the property of the Association 
just as any other report. (Adopted 1898.) 

Resolved, That henceforth this Association withdraw fellowship from any 
church that allows its members to engage in the manufacture and sale of 
intoxicating liquors as a beverage. (1891.) 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this Association that selling intoxicating 
liquors through a dispensary is a violation of the spirit and letter of the 
resolution of our Constitution. (1905.) 



RULES OF ORDER. 

1. The Association shall convene annually at the time and place of its 
own adjournment. 

2. During each annual session it shall meet and adjourn from day to day 
at the hours fixed upon by the body. 

3. All meetings of the Association shall be opened and closed with religious 
exercises. 

4. A majority of the members present shall be a quorum for the transac- 
tion of business. 

5. No member shall absent himself temporarily without leave of the Mod- 
erator, nor finally without leave of the body. 

6. No member shall speak more than twice on the same subject without 
permission of the body. 

7. No member shall be allowed to talk, stand up, read or move about the 
house during business, except to gain or impart information under considera- 
tion. 

8. No committee shall be in session during the hour of business without 
permission from the body. 

9. All questions of order not herein provided for shall be decided by 
Mell's Parliamentary Practice. 



6 



Order of Business. 



ORDER OF BUSINESS. 
First Day. 

11:00 a. m. — Introductory Sermon. 

12:00 m. — Enroll delegates. Appoint Committee on Credentials. 
12:30 p. m. — Recess. 
2:00 p. m. — Report of Committee on Credentials; organize, read Constitu- 
tion; call names of churches that failed to represent them- 
selves; at last session; receive new churches; invite visi- 
tors; appoint Committees. 
3:00 p. m. — Orphanage. 
4:00 p. m. — Assignment of Homes. 
Adjournment. 

Second Day. 

Devotional Exercises. 
Report on Church Statistics. 
Chowan College. 
Report on Foreign Missions. 
Report on State Missions. 
Recess. 

Report on Education. 
Home Missions. 
Miscellaneous Business. 
Adjournment. 

Third Day. 

9:30 a. m. — Devotional Exercises. 

9:45 a. m. — Routine Business. 
10:00 a. m. — Ministers' Relief. 
11:00 a. m. — Report of Committees. 
12:00 m. — Miscellaneous Business. 
Adjournment. 



9:30 


a. 


m. — 


9:45 


a. 


m. — 


10:00 


a. 


m. — 


11:00 


a. 


m. — 


12:00 


m. — 


1:00 


p. 


m. — 


2:40 


p. 


m. — 


3:00 


p. 


m. — 


4:00 


p. 


m. — 



C. W. SCARBOROUGH, 
R. L. GAY, 

T. T. SPEIGHT, Committee. 



PROCEEDINGS. 



Tuesday, October 29, 1912. 

The West Chowan Baptist Association met this day in its thirtieth annual 
session with the Republican Baptist Church, Bertie County, North Carolina. 
The introductory sermon was preached by T. L. Brown from James 2:8. 

The roll of delegates was called and the delegates were enrolled as 
follows : 

LIST OF DELEGATES. 

Ahoskie— W. H. Miller, J. B. Modlin, S. E. Dilday. 
Aulander— C. W. Mitchell, W. H. Mitchell, Herbert Jenkins. 
Ashley Grove— W. H. Vann, J. K. Vann, *Q. K. Futrell. 
Bethlehem— R. P. Thomas, W. A. Perry. 
Bethany — L. F. Castellow, J. R. Barham, Claude Evans. 
Brantley's Grove — J. W. Dilday, *F. A. Dilday, *Floyd Overton. 
Buckhorn— T. B. Vann, R. O. Whitley, H. F. Lee. 

Capehart's— H. J. Ward, J. T. White, *T. H. Pearce, Clinton Haggard. 

Cashie— W. S. Pritchard, J. H. White, J. H. Mathews, H. J. Castellow. 

Center Grove — J. D. Jenkins, J. D. Early. 

Chowan — J. C. Scarborough, W. P. Shaw. 

Christian Harbor — J. H. Evans, Starkey Hare, J. H. Myers. 

Colerain— E. White, *H. E. Wilson, C. C. Holder. 

Connaritsa — ^J. S. Jenkins, Josiah Early, R. L. Cowan. 

Creeksville— *W. S. Davis, *C. W. Bridgers, *G. T. Futrell, *R. Davis. 

Conway — *A. Lassiter, Alvah Martin. 

Blam— *J. L. Taylor, *C. L. Stephenson, *M. L. Daniel. 

Galatia— *W. J. Blythe, *J. E. Taylor, *Cleveland Davis, *C. W. Taylor. 

Green's X Roads— G. M. Castellow, *C. W. Mizzelle. 

Harrellsville— W. E. Miller, *J. D. Lowe, I. M. Taylor. 

Hebron— H. T. Vann, R. K. Outland, W. T. Britt ] 

Hillside — A. Bunch, A. S. Collins. 

Holly Grove — M. R. Barnes, W. S. Vaughan. 

Holly Springs— J. R. Wilder, R. S. Mathews. 

Jackson — *P. J. Long, *J. L. Newsome, Sr. 

Kelford— W. C. Evans, W. E. Parker, W. C. Overton. 

Lasker — G. T. Whims, *M. R. Bridgers. 

Lawrence's — W. M:. Keeter, J. W. Langdale, J. R. Phelps. 

Lewiston — W'. Mitchell, W. F. Morris, W. L. Taylor. 

Margarettsville — Jordan Edwards, *D, B. Bridgers. 

Mars Hill — L. P. Freeman, J. M. Phelps, J.E. Jordan, E'rastus HarrelL 

Meherrin— W. S, Nelson, C. C. Parker, S. W. Cooke. 

Mount Carmel — J. G. Joyner, *Charles Boone, *Rufus Maddry. 

Mt. Tabor— J. W. Boone, *H. C. Britt, Oris Mathews. 

Murfreesboro — J. D. Bruner, R. Sewell. 

Menola — *C. S. Edv/ards, John Chitty, J. F. Cowan. 

Merry Hill— J. T. Keeter, S. A. Adams. 

Oak Grove— *W. M. Marsh, J. B. Lassiter. 

Pine Forest — *J. B. Collier, *J. L. Camp. 

Potecasi — *E. B. Lassiter, F. C. Jenkins, *J. E. Gilliam. 

Pleasant Grove— M. L. Taylor, Kader Powell, B. B. Baggett. 

Powellsville— *J. E. Matthews, *A. S. Wymis. 

Republican — J. R. Bynum, S. Ward, Levi Ward, W. S. Cowan. 

Rich Square — W. J. Lassiter, J. T. Bolton, *J. P. Holloman. 



*Absent. 



8 



Minutes of the 



Roanoke— W. J. Lassiter, C. C. Futrell. 
Roquist— J. M. Yates, J. N. Pritchard. 

Robert's Chapel— J. H. Stephenson, W. H. Stephenson, J. E. Johnson. 
Ross's— H. J. Lawrence, T. N. White, J. T. Hoggard, N. J. Todd. 
Sandy Run— W. J. Watson, J. H. Liverman, J. H. Peele. 
Seaboard — 

Slloam— G. D. Leggett, C. B. Speller. 
Severn— W. M. Long, T. O. Joyner. 

St. John's— E. W. Baggett, *R. L. Edwards, *M. R. Sumner. 
Union— J. A. Copeland, J. R. Holden, J. Brown. 
Winton— J. S. Mitchell, *J. H. Jenkins. 
Woodland— * J. M. Taylor, N. B. Griffin, G. M. Holloman. 

*Absent. 

The committee on Credentials reported all the churches in accord with 
the constitution. 

Election of officers resulted as follows: T. Gillam, Moderator; J. S. 
Mitchell, Vice-Moderator; N. W. Britton, Clerk; R. P. Thomas, Treasurer; 
Q. C. Davis, Historian. 

On motion the consideration of Foreign Missions and that of the Or- 
phanage was interchanged as to the time for the reports of these two 
objects. 

J. S. Farmer, C. J. Thomson, T. G. Wood, L. Johnson, J. E. Ray, M. L. 
Kesler were recognized as visitors and welcomed to seats in the Asso- 
ciation. 

The Association adjourned for dinner, with the benediction by C. W. 
Scarborough. 



AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The Association re-assembled at 2:30 o'clock. W. B. Waff led in prayer. 

On motion, a summary of the letter of Cashie Church, which from some- 
unknown cause was not published in the Minutes of last year, was ordered 
to be published in the Minutes of this year. 

The Finance Committee consists of J. F. Cale, A. V. Cobb and Starkey 
Ward; Committee on Time, Place and Preacher for the next session con- 
sists of C. W. Mitchell, J. T. Bolton, J. H. Matthews. 

The report on Foreign Missions was read by R. L. Gay: 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

Foreign Missions (as all other missions) originated in the heart of God, 
and began to take form in human history at the "call of Abraham." Now 
the Lord had said unto Abram, 'Get thee out of thy country, and from their 
Hndred, and from their father's house, unto a land that I will show thee; 
and I will make of thee a great nation, and I will bless thee, and make thy 
narie great; and thou shalt be a blessing; and I will bless them that bless 
thee, and curse him that curseth thee, and in thee and in thy seed shall all 
the families of the earth be blessed.— (Gen. XII; 1-3)." 

To Jacob He renewed the promise, saying: "The land wnereon thou 
lived, to thee will I give it, and to thy seed; and thy seed shall be as the 
dust of the earth, and thou shalt spread abroad to the west, and to tne 
east, and to the north, and to the south; and in thee and thy seed shall 
all the families of the earth be blessed."— Gen. XXVII; 13-14). 

In the establishment and developing of the Jewish people there is mam- 



West Chowan Baptist Association 



9 



feot two great purposes, viz.: (1) That in this nation should be fostered 
the knowledge and worship of the one true God; and (2) Through this nation 
this l^nowledge and worship should be propagated throughout the whole 
world. 

This purpose is even more manifest in the New Testament than in the 
Old. The last recorded words of our Saviour bear directly on this subject 
and lav upon Christians the unmistakable injunction to evangelize the whole 
world.' (See Matthew XXVIII; r8-20, Mark XVI; 14-lG, Luke XXIV; 46-48, 
Acts I; 7-8). Isaiah, in Messianic prophesy, says: "Behold, thou shalt call a 
nation that thou knowest not, and nations that know not thee shall run unto 
thee, because of the Lord thy God, and for the Holy One of Israel; for He 
hath glorified thee." Our Saviour, the fulfilment of prophesy, declares: 
"Other sheep I have which are not of this fold; them must I also bring, 
and they shall hear my voice, and there shail be one fold (one floci.) and one 
sheijberd." Peter's prejudices were troken by the vision of the net and 
he carried the gospel to the company of Gentiles in the home of Cornelius. 
Paul was "anointed to go far hence to the Gentiles." Paul and Barnabas and 
Silas and Luke and John, Mark and Timothy and others formed a goodly 
company of foreign missionaries, who almost accomplished the task of 
worid-wide evangelization in their generation. So manifestly is the spirit 
01 Christ the spirit of missions and so thoroughly is the Bible permeated 
with the doctrine of missions, that we must conclude that an anti-missionary 
church is an anti-Christian and an anti-missionary Christian is a contradic- 
tion of terms. Never in the world's history have the needs of Foreign 
Missions been more manifestly urgent, nor the fields more inviting than 
today. The world-wide unrest, the disgust of Papal countries with the 
effete dogmas and corrupt practices of Romanism, the longing of Pagan 
lands for liberty and the consequent spread of democracy, the restless im- 
pulses towards progressive government, all constitute one long, loud cry 
for the freedom of the gospel. The wonderful transformation of Japan, the 
marvelous awakening of (Dhina, the portentious moveraents of other Far 
Eastern countries tell, in language too plain to be mistaken, that world- 
revolutions are taking place which need to have stamped on them the 
blessed spirit of the religion of the Lord Jesus Christ. 

"Westward the course of Empire takes its way," and it has been noted 
also that the triumphs of Christianity have followed the same course — from 
Asia to Europe and from Europe to America. 

Individuality and liberty, two inherent and basal principles of the Chris- 
tian religion, have their highest development among A^merican Baptists. 
Without these the world's cry for democracy can never be satisfied. Since 
we have them as no other people have, it rests upon us, as upon no other 
people, to give them to the world. This gives us an advantage over all 
other nations and denominations and imposes upon us a corresponding 
responsibility. Oh that we, with our tremendous advantages of untold 
wealth and world-wide influence, would arise in the strength of the Lord and 
take the world for Christ. 

The following extracts are from a suggestive report sent out by the 
Foreign Mission Board: 

"Our present fields are Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Italy, Africa, Japan and 
China. 

"The present number of missionaries is two hundred and seventy-one. The 
native workers have been increased to 577, making a total force of 848. 
The 342 native churches are growing in self-support and missionary efforts. 
The 422 Sunday Schools are doing aggressive work. Nine ¥/omens' Train- 
ing Schools have 312 students, and ten theological schools have 245 students. 
These with the other 208 schools of all grades have 6,156 pupils. In six 
hospitals and thirteen dispensaries, thirteen medical missionaries treated 51,- 



IX) Minutes of the 

T96 patients during the year. Four publishing plants are sending out mil- 
lions of pages of religious literature. 

The cortributions for 1911-'12 were $580,408, a gain of $70,400 over the 
previous year. Of this amount 12 per cent, was used for expenses at home, 
as follows- In Richmond, five per cent.; W. M. U., one per cent.; mterest, 
2 1-2 per cent; State expenses, 3 1-2 per cent. This percentage of expenses 
is larger than the Board wants it to be. Our people can reduce it very 
much by sending their money all through the year, so as to save the interest, 
account Let it also be remembered that a large part of the money used at 
home is expended in efforts to arouse our people and increase contributions. 

"The Southern Ba^ptist Convention asks the churches to raise $618,000 
for Foreign Missions this year. Every dollar of it is needed to meet past 
obligations and maintain the work on hopeful basis. The Convention ap^ 
poriioned this amount among the various States, and the amount asked of 
■each State is apportioned among the Associations. ' _ , , ^ 

One hundred years ago Adoniram Jordan and Luther Rice went out to 
India as Congregational missionaries. By the study of the Bible ihey be- 
came Baptists. This fact aroused the Baptists of America to undertake For- 
•eign Missions in an organized way. -r^ ^. ^ 

•'The most significant advance ever ordered by the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention took place when the Oklahoma meeting last May authorized the 
Foreign Mission Board to raise one million, two hundred and fifty thousand 
•dollars as an Equipment Fund, in honor of the Judson Centennial. One 
million' dollars of this to be used for equipping and publication work. Two 
hundred and fifty thousand dollars is to be used for building chapels, hos- 
pitals and missionary homes. This is a mighty call, but it is made to a 
mieht'y people. This fund is to be raised during the next three years. It 
is to be entirelv separate from the Foreign Mission offering and the effort 
will be mace to secure it in such a way as not to interfere with any other 
cause." 

Recommendations. 

1 We would earnestly urge upon our people the importance of education 
In missionary work. Attention is again called to the fact that tracts ahd 
leaflets bearing on every phase of Foreign Mission work may be ohtamed 
by simply writing a card to the Foreign Mission Board, Richmond, Va. We 
Insist that our people take and read the Foreign Mission Journal, which is 
furnished bv the Board at 35 cents per year, single copies, or m clubs of 
ten for only 25 cents. We also recommend that Mission Study Classes be 
conducted wherever it is possible to do so. 

2 That we urge the churches to make their offerings, if possible, at the 
beginning, instead of at the end of the year, so that the Board will not be 
compelled to borrow and to pay interest on borrowed money. 

3 That Womens' Missionarv Societies be organized in the churches m 
which they do not already exist and that we strive to encourage and 
strengthen those already in existence. a 

4 That we urge our people to spend more time in prayer for God s bies- 
ing on Foreign Missions and that they increase their contributions at least 
twentv-five per cent, during the coming year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. L. GAY. 

This report was discussed by C. J. Thomson, and was adopted. 

R. L. Gay was appointed as Foreign Mission manager of this Association. 

J. S. Farmer spoke briefly on the Biblical Recorder. 

The Committee on Hospitality at this point assigned homes to delegates. 
On motion, the Association adjourned. Benediction was pronounced by 
Li. Johnson. 



West Chotvan Baptist Association. 



11 



WEDNESDAY MORNING SESSION. 

The devotional exercises were conducted by D. P. Harris. 
The Moderator, T. Gillam, called the Association to order, and the work 
of the day began with prayer by M, L. Kesler. 

STATISTICAL AND FINANCIAL REPORT. 



Number churches 56 

Number reporting no Pastor 2 

Number reporting no baptisms 11 

Number baptisms during the year 284 

Number deaths during the year 105 

Total membership of the churches 11962 

Contributions. 

State Missions $ 2,980.76 

Home Missions 2,143.74 

Foreign Missions 3,015.84 

Orphanage 4,195.64 

Colleges and Schools 731.19 

Ministerial Education 509.79 

Aged Ministers 297.29 

Sunday School Missions 92.05 

Other objetcs 1,651.06 



Total $15,617.36 

Number churches not contributing to Ministerial Education 8 

Number churches not contributing to Aged Ministers 10 

Number churches not contributing to Orphanage 3 



D. P. Harris made the report on Chowan College: 

REPORT ON CHOWAN COLLEGE. 

The sixty-fourth session of Chowan College closed May 16, 1912. During 
the year 1911-1912 the College enrolled 121 students, 111 of whom were 
boarders. By the closest economy, it managed to pay all its current ex- 
penses and to incur no new debt. The sixty-fifth session has opened with 
144 students, filling all of our dormitories to their fullest capacity. This is 
the largest opening in the history of the institution. 

There are fourteen members of the faculty, all of whom are Baptists, and 
three of them are from the ChowanAssociation, and three from the West 
Chowan Association. The curriculum has been greatly enlarged. The 
course leading to the degree of A. B. is now as substantial as that of any 
other college for Vv'omen in the State. Among other things, it comprises 
three years each of Latin and Mathematics, four years each of English 
and Natural Science, six years of Modern Languages, one year each of the 
Bible and History of Christian Missions, p.nd two j^ears of Normal Training. 
There is also connected with the College a preparatory department, cover- 
ing two years of work. 

The College is having a hard struggle for existence. Equipment is badly 
needed. The most pressing needs are a heating and lighting plant, a laundry 
and a system of sewerage and water-works. This College, founded in 1848 
by the Baptists of Eastern North Carolina and Virginia, as Chowan Baptist 
Female Institute, is but the visible expression of a deep-felt need for a 
;School of higher education and broadest training for the womanhood of this 
great Chowan country. As a people, we are justly proud of the splendid 
achievements of this College, and shall ever consider ourselves under lasting 
obligation to the m.emories of its founders, as also to those who have been 



12 



Minutes of the 



its faithful teachers and guardians. Possibly we have never yet come to a 
full appreciation of its real v^ortti. As we look about us at the many evi- 
dences of thorough and successful work, and remember that all this patient 
endeavor has gone to the widening of mental vision, the training of faculty, 
and the building up of character, we are filled with rejoicing that this insti- 
tution has not only required, but actually had, the prayers and sacrifices 
and tears of those who have lived in its life in the past, and of those who 
live with it today. 

But the mere assurance of reverent regard is not enough. Lofty estimates 
of the work of another are far more cheering, if those estimates are ac- 
complished with something that shall make the practical problems of that 
work more comprehensible, or its prosecution more inspiilng. For "If a 
brother or sister be naked, and destitute of daily food, and one of you 
say unto them, depart in peace, be ye warmed and filled; notwithstanding ye 
give them not those things which are needful to the body; what doth it 
profit?" Jas. 2:15, 6. 

The whole world is struggling to make norm.al men an] women. When 
disease attacks the body we hurry to the physician that he may bring the 
body back to its normal condition. Ignorance is also an abnormality, and 
the supremest effort of our colleges is to remove this condition and give 
to us men and women of the truest and noblest 'type. But is the president 
of a college, and his corps of teachers, under any more obligation to do this 
than the rest of us? The president and trustees realize that the College 
cannot continue to live and do its important work without an endowment. 
If the State makes appropriations to the State schools, it is fitting and 
necessary that the churches should make appropriations for the church or 
denominational schools. Our very earnest prayer is that the churches will 
adopt the request of the Association and make annual contributions to the 
endowment of the College. We hope, also, that individuals will make annual 
subscriptions and provide bequests in their wills for the same object. The 
present endowment fund amounts to nearly $1, GOO. 00. 

At this writing we are glad to report that the enrollment of students has 
greatly increased over that of last year, until there are now 144; every raom 
being occupied. Several new families have already moved to tov^i for the 
purpose of educating their daughters. Competent workmen are installing the 
sewerage system and heating plant. This is a wonderful stride forward in 
the life of the College, not only as a convenience, but also as an absolute 
necessity for the health of our girls. 

We see by this report that if the College continues its present rapid 
growth, additional buildings must be constructed. We must not grow weary 
in well doing, neither must we hope for a day when we shall not have a 
great obligation resting upon us for continued enlargement of our own 
Chowan College. The constant appeals to us for contributions to her needs 
is a blessing to us, and also ties us about her life as nothing else could well 
do. Let us therefore endow it, and enlarge it, and send it forth on its great 
mission. 

In this College there is the true idea of higher education. For higher 
education means more than passing into a training beyond that of our com- 
mon schools ; for the student — whatever she may study — does not pass over 
the line that separates between the lower and the higher, until she, be- 
cause of an inner passion, seeks knowledge. Here our girls are made to re- 
alize the slumbering faculties of their being, and begin to reach out after 
the true, and the beautiful, and the good. 

The endowment fund is slowly increasing, and we look for a day when 
that shall be large enough to give substantial aid in maintaining the col- 
lege. ' 

All of the graduates of last year have good positions, and are doing a. 
good work. We find by careful comparison that the Chowan girls are main- 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



13 



taining a high rank along by the side of the graduates from other colleges. 
The Baptist State Convention now gives this College the same time on its 
program as it does to Meredith or Wake Forest. 

With the increasing interests of the College, the duties of the president 
are increasing, so that the duties of administration are possibly already too 
great for one man. Yet there is such a spirit of unity prevailing not only in 
the student body, but also among the faculty, as to greatly help in the 
management. 

"Enlargement" must be our watchword. Already it is thought that Greek 
and Italian will be added to the curriculum for next year, as electives. 

Since Rev. Q. C. Davis has become a member of the faculty the girls have 
Baptist preaching more frequently than before, and it is hoped that some 
provision may soon be made which will enable them to hear their own faith 
proclaimed twice every Sabbath day. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. P. HARRIS, 
For Committee. 

This report was spoken to by J. D. Bruner, and was adopted. 
The following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That this Association request the State Mission Board to appro- 
priate $400.00 annually out of any money, not otherwise appropriated, to 
the support of the pastor of the M'urfreesboro Church, which can not be at- 
tained without said appropriation. 

C. W. Mitchell and J. C. Scarborough spoke to the resolution. 

T. L. Brown made the report on the Orphanage. 

REPORT ON THE ORPHANAGE. 

The Thomasville Baptist Orphanage was founded in the year 1885. On 
the eleventh day of November in that good year, the first orphan child was 
received. Though born in the midst of a storm, the movement was at first 
most vigorously opposed by some of our strongest and best brethren, the 
institution long ago assumed its rightful place nearest the great heart of 
the denomination. No movement in the history of North Carolina Baptists 
has so quickened the pulse of our people. Indeed, every other denominational 
interest has been brought under obligation to this institution for the effect 
it has had in awakening the churches to a keener sense of duty along all 
lines of Christian activity. 

During the twenty-seven years of its existence, the Orphanage has had a 
maivelous growth. Its plant, valued at $250,000, is one of the very best. It 
consists of a farm of 450 acres, with necessary equipment, eleven cottages, 
dining hall, school building, library building, printing office, infirmary, indus- 
trial building, and laundry. This last, together with our own West Chowan 
cottage, were completed during the past year. There are at present 400 
children in the inscitution. The monthly cost of maintenance and schooling 
of each orphan is about $8.33 1-3. A very simple calculation shows us that 
about $110.00 per day, or about $770.00 per week must come into its treasury 
to meet current expenses. 

No institution fostered by our people is doing a greater work for God 
and for humanity. The aim of the managem.ent is to provide as far as pos- 
sible a real home for the children. They seek to keep before them life's 
highest ideals and purposes, and thus to send them forth into the world 
equipped for life's duties. For ten months in the year they maintain one 
of the best graded schools in all the land. And for the boys there are farm 
departments for manual training — printing office, machine shop, shoe shop, 
and the farm — ^tbe latter embracing gardening and dairying. These depart- 
ments, too, turn a handsome revenue into the Orphanage treasury. For the 



14 



Minutes of the 



girls there are abundant opportunities for training them to become efficient 
home-makers, in the cooking, sewing, laundry, and general housekeeping de- 
partments. The children spend one-half of each day in school and the other 
half is given to work or recreation. 

The health of the children, during the past year has been excellent, owing 
to a perfect system of water-works and general sanitary conditions. Because 
of excessive drought the past summer crops are short. 

The Orphanage Board of Trustees, in their report to the last session of 
the Baptist State Convention, said: "We could fill another Orphanage as 
large as we have in six months, if we had room.." It was seemingly in answer 
to this cry for more room that Mr, and Mrs. W. L. Kennedy, of Lenoir County, 
offered to the Board their magnificent farm of 1200 acres, with the one con- 
dition attached that a branch Orphanage be established thereon. Truly this 
was the voice of God calling the Baptists of the State to renewed consecra- 
tion and effort. This gracious offer was accepted by the Board and thus an- 
other $100,000 was added to the denomination's holdings. But more new 
and mighty obligations were also added. That we may enter in at once and 
"possess this land" there is urgent need right now for funds with which to 
construct dormitories. Then, of course, the opening of doors to more childi'en 
will mean a larger current fund. 

Another pressing need that must be held before our people, until it has 
been met, is an assembly hall — a place where the children may gather for all 
necessary public services. 

While the reports from the churches of this Association last year show 
an increase over the year before in their total gifts to the Orphanage of 
$892.06, they also show that 23 Sunday Schools and 8 churches gave nothing 
to this object as against 17 Sunda^^ Schools and 5 churches reporting nothing 
the preceding year. The increase in the total was doubtless due to our 
contributions last year to the West Chowan Building. Advancement, breth- 
ren, and not retrogression, should be our watchword. 

We urge that all the Sunday Schools of the Association take a collection 
once a month for this object. And that our people be kept informed as to 
the work of the Orphanage we recommend that our schools take Charitj^ and 
Children, which may be had at sixty cents per year in clubs of ten or more. 
We also heartily commend the plan — already becoming quite general among 
the churches of the State — of holding services on Thanksgiving Day, at 
which collections for the Orphanage are taken. If more convenient, some 
Sunday near to it may be observed as Orphanage Day. This should become a 
fixed custom among North Carolina Baptists. T. L. BROWN, 

For Committee. 

M. L. Kesler addressed the Association at this point, and the report was 
adopted. 

The report on State Missions was presented by Q, C. Davis: 
REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

The proclamation of the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ unto all, in order 
that they might be saved, is a duty of the churches of Christ, founded upon 
our Lord's example and command, and prompted by love to God and men. 
Missions are world-wide in their scope, but the divine order makes the 
evangelization of one's own territory first, both in time and importance. 
Hence, our superior obligation to State Missions. 

Both church history and experience in preaching teaches us that it is 
easier to win men to Christ at some times, and in some places, than it is 
at other times and places. This is due largely to different conditions obtain- 
ing among men. 

The conditions in North Carolina, present and growing, are such as call 
for greater activity in State Missions, 



West CJiOwan Baptist Association. 



15 



1. First among these conditions to be mentioned is the increasing pros- 
perity of our State. No great nation in the world's history, perhaps, was 
ever so prosperous as our nation is today; and North Carolina is realizing 
her share of the prosperity. She is fast becoming a great manufacturing 
State, and this industry alone is sufficient to turn the tide of prosperity to a 
community or country. Improved farming methods, derived from greater 
knowledge of the soil, the crops, and machinery are increasing the farmers' 
wealth. Good roads, which in themselves generally measure the whole diam- 
eter between prosperity and poverty, are being industriously sought by the 
people of our State. Now, as desirable as prosperity is, it has its attendant 
dangers. The first result is, generally, a greater degree of physical com- 
fort, which is well; but the next is distracting pleasure seeking, which neg- 
lects religion; and then enervating luxury and indulgence which complete 
the estrangement of life and righteousness. An ounce of prevention here is 
worth a whole ton of cure. And the only remedy for the abuse of prosperity 
is the Gospel of Christ strenuously preached at the very centers of pros- 
perity, and at its very beginning. Then prosperity may become a blessing 
to religion, and not a curse. 

2. The e lucational era is coming upon North Carolina with a rush. The 
cry of the child for educational opportunity is being heard. The demand for 
a longer school term in the country districts will surely be met. Already 
graded schools, some of them with high school rank, are springing up in 
village, hamlet and country, as well as in towns and cities. These schools 
are increasing in attendance, and our colleges are full as never before. The 
prophetic vision of our lamented Aycock is fast being realized. But educa- 
tion is not an unqualified blessing. When pervaded and moulded and di- 
rected by the imperishable truths of the Great Teacher it becomes Christi- 
anity's best handmaiden. When severed from the religion of Jesus it be- 
comes the keenest weapon in the hands of the enemies of truth. It is the 
province of State Missions to see that in town and country the Gospel of 
the Son of God shall be so proclaimed that growth in the knowledge of our 
Lord Jesus Christ shall keep pace with the increase in secular knowledge. 
To do this larger contributions to State Missions will be necessary. Unless 
this larger work is done speedily the difficulties will be increased; and will 
increase in proportion to the length of the delay in meeting the tasks. 

We would recommend: (1) That we endorse the plans and policies of the 
State Mission Board in its attempts to accomplish the v/ork committed to 
it; (2) That we earnestly urge our churches to increase their offerings to 
State Missions, believing that the increased prosperity of our people war- 
rants our Lord in expecting such advance; (3) That we especially request 
our churches to begin the effort to raise State Mission funds earlier in our 
associational year, so that our State Mission Secretary might be relieved 
from a part of the great strain that comes upon him as the close of the 
conventional year approaches, for fear that some unforseen cause might 
prevent the churches from meeting their obligations to this work. "Freely ye 
have received, freely give," and that in proportion to the needs of the work. 



and the blessings of God upon us. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Q. C. DAVIS, 



I 



J. H. STEPHENSON, 
J. H. JENKINS, 



Committee. 



Q. C. Davis and L. Johnson discussed the report, and it was adopted. 
Adjourned for dinner, with prayer by Q. C. Davis. 



16 



Minutes of the 



AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The Association was called to order, and was led in prayer by C. W. 
Scarborough. 

The report on Home Missions was read by C. L. Dowell: 
HOME MISSION REPORT. 

In recent years there has been a great and gratifying advance among 
Southern Baptists in Home Mission conviction, giving and results. 

In 1902 the receipts of our Home Board were $88,874; in 1912 they were 
$366,050; and the apportionment ordered by the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion for the present fiscal year ending M;ay 1, 1913, is $412,000. So great 
and pressing are the needs that the Board appropriated the whole $412,000, 
except $97, at its meeting in July. This means that the churches must 
make an advance of 15 per cent, in their contributions next year. 

The results show a corresponding increase during the same period. In 
1902 the Board employed 674 missionary workers, who reported 8,150 bap- 
tisms and total additions to the churches of 17,201. They reported 231 
churches constituted and G74 Sunday Schools organized. In 1912 the Board 
employed 1,309 missionary workers, who report 26,899 baptisms and total 
additions to the churches of 47,728. Six hundred and eighty-three churches 
were constituted and 754 Sunday Schools organized. Many of these workers 
were maintained wholly by the Home Board, though a still larger number 
worked in co-operation with other missionary organizations. 

It is declared that the meeting of the Home Board last July was the 
most representative it has ever had. We learn that thirteen of the State 
Vice-Presidents were present and participated in making up the budget for 
the year and planning the work. Evidently the Vice-Presidents contributed 
much to the occasion and it was the enthusiastic conviction oi those present 
that to supply the urgent demands for help that came up from all over the 
South the Board could not do less than it was empowefed to do," and then 
put its faith in the brethren everywhere that they will come up to tie 
help of this great cause and raise every dollar of the apportionment, re- 
membering that the work is not the work of the Home Board but of Baptist 
brethren throughout the South. Let us in North Carolina remember, too, 
that $12,450 of the amount asked for Home Missions is appropriated to the 
work of the Lord right here among our own people. 

The watchword of the Home Board is Forward! and it has planned a 
distinctly aggressive campaign for the present year. Besides the regular 
work, steps forward were taken in two ways: 

The first was in conformity to the instructions of the Southern Baptist 
Convention that the Board at once should take steps to raise a $1,000,000 
Church Building Loan Fund. It was decided to complete the raising of this 
fund within three years and to employ special workers for this purpose at the 
earliest possible moment. There are 3,000 or more houseless Baptist 
churches in our territory and in hundreds of these the establishment of 
strong centers for Christ and His truth only awaits some aid in erecting 
churcli-liouses. 

The second large step taken was in lesponse to repeated reports of the 
Board to the Southern Baptist Convention and repeated committee reports 
before that body calling for the Home Board to put forth larger efforts to 
help in training and enlisting backward churches. This note, first sounded 
in recent years by the lamented Dr. F. H. Kerfoot, haS' become stronger 
and stronger until now several of the State Boards have made requests of 
the Home Board for aid in this work. At its July meeting the Board ordered 
the establishment of a Department of Enlistment and Co-operation and pro- 
^ ided for the election of a special representative to labor in this department. 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



17 



The special need for this new departure will become apparent when we 
recall our rapidly changing conditions, and the fact that for immediate and 
perinanent results, this country is the greatest Foreign Mission field on 
earth. 

We believe that in this movement there are prospective blessings for 
Southern Baptists and their usefulness that are almost beyond our concep- 
tion. It looks to "teaching them to observe all things" as well as to saving 
the lost and baptizing the converted. It will provide for helping to train 
the churches more fully in all the ways of the Lord as well as enlisting 
them in larger giving. 

Our Board is leading Southern Baptists in a worthy way in the great 
and fundamental work of saving the South. Your committee warmly com- 
mends it and its work to the prayers and enthusiastic and liberal support 
of the churches in our Association. We recommend: 

1. That clubs of subscribers be raised in every church lor the Home 
Field, the splendid monthly of the Board. Price, 35 cents, single copies, 
or 25 cents in clubs of five or more. 

2. That pastors and workers secure and read the Board's instructive new 
book, "The Home Mission Task." Price 50 cents in cloth, 10 cents extra for 
postage; 35 cents in paper, 7 cents extra for postage. 

3. That large use be made of the varied, and helpful tracts of the Board, 
which are mailed free on application, for distribution among our church 
members. 

4. That this Association provide for apportioning among its churches the 
amount we are asked to raise for Home Missions this year. 

5. That all of our pastors be requested to presch upon this great cause 
I at least once during the year. The Board will slf.dly furnish material for 
j special study of pastors on request. 

I G. We recomn-iend the organization of Miission Study Classes wherever 
I possible. 

i The address of the Home Mission Board is 1002 Third National Bank Build- 
i ing, Atlanta, Georgia. Requests for the magazii^e, tracts, the books and 
j other printed matter, should be addressed to the Publicity Department. 

C. L. DO WELL, 

I For Committee. 

! This report was discussed by C. L. Dowell and Q. C. Davis, and was 
adopted. 

i J. S. Mitchell reported that he had received from the churches for C. 
I Wilder $150.00, and paid the sam.e to him to help defray his expenses while 
t he was at the Louisville Seminary. 

RESOLUTION OFFERED BY D. P. HARRIS. 

Whereas, Baptists aire guardiars of the spiritual foundations of democracy; 
' and, whereas, tbe modern Republic cannot long endure in ignorance of the 
' religious essentials of democracy, it behooves North Carolina Baptists to 
make Baptist principles felt in every educational center of our State; there- 
fore, be it 

Resolved, 1. That our Stace Mission Board be encouraged in maintaining 
an efficiert Baptist Sunday School hard by every day school and college in 
North Carolira; that this Association assert its approval of the State Mission 
: Board's desire to support the strongest possible preacher in every educa- 
cational center of cir State; that this Association go on record as favoring 
j a denoiiiirational policv that will ultimately put an adequate house of wor- 
^ ship in all our principal educational centers of North Carolina. 

2. That it is the sense of this Association that the way should be cleared 
for working out this policy, by the denominations coming to the help of the 
local church at Wake Forest in supplying our own Wake Forest College with 
a house of worship, ample for taking care of all the students that may ever 
go to Wake Forest to study there. 



18 



Minutes of tJie 



3. That some denominational agency be empowered to push this matter,, 
so that at least every three years a new, ample church-building sihall be 
erected in one of our educational centers until all of them are supplied with 
churches. D. P. HARRIS. 

The Association adjourned with prayer by M. L. Kesler. 



THURSDAY MORNING SESSION. 

The devotional exercises were conducted by C. W. Scarborough, after 
which the Association began its work for the day, prayer being offered by 
D. Cale. 

A motion of thanks was extended this church and its friends for the 
generous hospitality we have received during this session. 

TREASURER'S REPORT. 
James S. Mitchell, Treasurer, in account with West Chowan Association: 



Oct. 26, 1911, To balance due $ 1.31 

Oct. 26, 1911, To amount from Finance Committee — Minute fund... 100.85 



$ 102.16 

CR. 

Nov. 11, 1911, By amount paid N. W. Britton, Clerk $ 30.00 

Dec. 7, 1911, By amount paid Nash Bros, for Minutes 70.25 



Total I 100.25 

To balance due Minute fund $ 1.91 

Respectfully submitted, 



JAMES S. MITCHELL, Treasurer. 

y 

The following motion was passed: 

That the committee on Order of Business be authorized to give thirty 
minutes to the discussion of Sunday Schools; said discussion to come at 
2:30 p. m. on the first day of the session, until otherwise ordered by the 
Association. 

The report on Education was read by J. C. Scarborough. 

REPORT ON EDUCATION. 

The education of our North Carolina citizenship has a large place in the 
minds and hearts of our people of every section of our good State. 

Our young men and young women have an inalienable right to such educa- 
tion as will best prepare them for American citizenship of high type. Our 
colleges and high schools are filled by youths eager for learning and the 
blessings which learning brings. There ought not to be a lack of learning to 
any boy or girl within the borders of the State. Our private schools are 
largely attended by the children of the people who are able to pay the ex- 
penses of their children attending the private schools. 

Our public schools supported by the State, from the University down to the 
ordinary free public schools, ought to be supported by such sums as may be 
needed to give every child a chance in life td make the best of himself or 
herself possible in his environment and right of opportunity. 

The good people of North Carolina ought to demand the enlargement of 
our public school funds, so as to guarantee to every child of the State a 
session of six months school every year, with competent teachers in charge, 
paid efficient salaries to enable them to properly train the youth for useful- 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



19 



ness to themselves/ and to the State as citizens, well qualified for the high 
duties of citizenship. 

Ministenal Education. 

There are now at Wake Forest College 90 ministerial students. Of these 
there are 75 who are dependent on our Board of Ministerial Education. 

We can not evangelize our people until we have well qualified and well 
educated ministers of the gospel to lead our people into higher Christian 
living and better and more efficient Christian work and organization. To 
this end let us bestir ourselves to look out for Christly lives among our young 
men already called to the work of the ministry and for others who may be 
timid and halting and to encourage them to consider the question as to 
whether God has called them to be preachers of the gospel. 

Let us pray the Lord of the harvest to call many workers into His harvest 
that the reaping may be abundant in His harvest to save the Golden grain, 
lest it be lost to any opportunity for garnering it into the Lord's granery. 

JOHN C. SCARBOROUGH, 
C. W. MITCHELL, 
J. T. STANCILL, 

Committee. 

This report was discussed by J. C. Scarborough, D. P. Harris, D. Cale. 
The report was adopted. 

H. J. Ward read the report on Ministers' Relief. 

REPORT QN MINISTERS' RELIEF BOARD. 

The name of the Ministers' Relief Board gives fully the purpose for which 
this was organized. There was felt a need for this board to be organized 
by reason of many ministers who have worn themselves out in the ministrj\ 
The Baptist people who see the need for help to old ministers who no longer 
do work as ministers ought by co-operation to supply the need which they 
see. 

The participants of this fund have for the most part been pioneers in our 
great work. The shadow of many a night found them many miles from any 
habitation and the man and his beast toiled on into the night. All honor to 
these pioneers of faith and hope and love for the Master. 
! Duty and pleasure should lead us to be generous with these fathers in 
Israel. Let us adopt the way that is an old one and that is' given. The rule 
ihas been to have at least one stated collection for this fund and to present 
the opportunity to give, and also to remind us of our duty to give to this 
worthy object as God blesses us in basket and in store. 

Respectfully, H. J. WARD, 

For Committee. 

This report was spoken to by J. W. Downey, and was adopted. 

The following were appointed delegates: J. S. Mitchell, Q. C. Davis, H. F. 
Brinson to the Baptist State Convention; T. Gillam, to the Southern Baptist 
Convention. 

J. F. Cale was appointed a member of the State Mission Board, and C. W. 
Scarborough was appointed a representative of the Home Mission Board 
in this Association. 

The Association, after a most pleasant session, closed to meet one year 
hence at Severn. The Association closed with prayer by H. F. Brinson, 
special mention being made of L A. Speight, who on account of sickness, 
could not attend this session. 

T. GILLAM, Moderator. 
N. W. BRITTON, Clerk. 



20 



Minutes of the 



HISTORIAN'S REPORT. 

Your Historian begs permission to report the following: It is gratifying 
to note the 

Substantial Progress 

made during the past associational year. In nearly every department of 
our work there has been an advance. While our baptisms are fewer than 
last year, our contributions to missions — State, Home and Foreign — are in 
excess of any previous year, while a number of our churches have enlarged 
these gifts for the new year. 
Since our last meeting some 

New Church Houses 

have been built. The Holly Grove saints have recently completed a house of 
worship, which will meet the demands of her growing work. We con- 
gratulate pastor and people. 

Republican Church has just completed a $3,500 new house of worship. 
We are proud of Republican for having equipped herself for larger service. 

W^ithin the year Kelford Church has put $1,000 in improvements on her 
horse of worship, giving it the appearance of a new building. 

Sandy Run Church is now making extensive improvements on her house of 
worship. We commend Pastor Downy and his flock. 

Ahoskie has paid off a $2,250 debt cn her new house of worship, which 
will now be completed. We congratulate Ahoslde on having captured the 
Elizabeth City Division of the Woman's Missionary Institute, which met 
here on October 9th and 10th. 

We extend a cordial welcome to the two 

New Pastors 

imported since last year. Pastor J. H. Downey is located at Woodland, and 
is serving Woodland, Pleasant Grove and Sandy Run. 

Pastor L. E. Doiley is located at Como, and is serving BucLhorn and 
Robert's Chapel. We note some 

Pastoral Changes Since Our Last Meeting. 

Pastor C. W. Scarborough has resigned the work at Hebron and Menola. 
He goes to Mount Tabor. Pastors A. L. Howell and J. H. Poteat have both 
left our Association. Elder J. E. Hoyle has resigned the work at Connaritsa. 
Pastor R. L. Cay has been called here. Eider D. Cole has resigned the work 
at St. John's and Creekville. Pastor O. C. Davis has resigned the work at 
Cashie. He goes to Myrfreesboro. Pastor S. B. Barnes becomes the shep- 
herd of Siloam and Hill Side. Elder T. L. Brown resigns the work at Winton. 

President Bruner's mual rei^ort on 

Chowan CoMege ^ 

is the most gratifying yet. The present enrollment is 144, the largest in 
the history of the College. There are five new members of the faculty — 
Misses Mary Ray, Claude Stephenson, Mary E. McCullers, Essie ¥7ynne, 
and Rev. O. C. Davis. Some church scholarships are still being offered. The 
endowment fund and loan fund are both growing, and are much needed. 
Out of a total business of $25,550 for the session of 1911-'12, only $98.00 re- 
mairs uncollected. A sewerage system and a heating plant are being in- 
stalled. 
As usual 

Necrology 

mup^ have considerable space. 

P -khorn Church has lost by death Sisters Beulah Waggette and H. S. 
L. ttle; Brethren S. D. Howell and W. R. Worrell. 

Holly Springs has lost a sainted soul in the death of Sister Brinson, wife 
of Pastor H^F. Brinson. 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



21 



Conway has lost in the death of Sister Sallie Martin a true and devoted 
woman. 

Severn has lost Brother Sam Pruden. 

Menola has lost by death Bro. William Chitty, a charter member, and one 
greatly beloved. 

Rich Square has lost Bro. B. C. Gatling. 

Lewiston has lost Brethren J. D. Bunch, Jackson Simmons, .John Copeland; 
also Sister Bridgers, who was indeed a mother in Israel. 
The session at 

Republican 

was a glorious one. Reports on the different boards showed careful prepara- 
tion. The discussions were good. Among the visitors we recall the fol- 
lowing: M. L. Kesler, L. Johnson, T. G. Wood, C. J. Thompson, J. S. Farmer, 
J. E. Ray, E. C. Andrews, and Mrs. T. C. Britton. Crowds were up to aver- 
age; entertainment was splendid; the spirit of the session was fine. The 
next session goes to Severn. 

JOHN F. CALE, Historian. 



22 



Minutes of the 

TABLE I— FINANCIAL. 



CHURCHES. 



1 cc a 
1 =5 « 



Ahoskie 

Aulander 

Ashley's Grove. . . 

Bethlehem 

Bethany 

Brantley's Grove. 

Buckhorn 

Capehart's 

Cashie 

Cashie * 

Center Grove.... 

Chowan 

Christian Harbor. 

Coleraine 

Cromartie 

Creeksville 

Conway 

Elam 

Galatia 

Green's X Roads. 
Harrellsville . . . . 

Hebron 

Hillside 

Holly Grove 

Holly Springs. . . . 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Lawrence's 

Lewiston 

Marg-arettsville . . 

Mars Hill 

Meherrin 

Mount Carmel. . . 

Mount Tabor 

Murfreesboro . . . . 

Menola 

Merrv Hill 

Oak Grove 

Pine Forest 

Potecasi 

Pleasant Grove. . . 

Powellsville 

Republican 

Rich Square 

Roanoke 

Roquist 

Robert's Chapel.. 



Sandy Run. 
Seaboard . , 
Slloam . . . . 
Severn . . . . 
St. John's. , 

Union 

Winton . . . , 
Woodland , 



$ 450.00 
1000.00 
125.00 
325.00 
200.00 
200.00 
500.00 
250.00 
lOOO.OO 
1000.00 
175.00 
600.00 
175.00 
450.00 
200.00 
150.00 
300.00 
200.00 
175.00 
200.00 
250.00 
200.00 
75.00 
200 . 00 
125.00 
200.00 
200.00 
125.00 
175.00 
2.50.00 
150.00 
225.00 
400.00 
200.00 
450.00 
400.00 
200.00 
150.00 
150.00 



225.00 
250.00 
150.00 
200.00 
400.00 
150.00 



400.00 
200.00 
250.00 



100.00 
525.00 
150.00 
400.00 
350.00 
400.00 



$2450.00 
284.98 
496.20 



16000.00 



59.27 
5. 



78.22 



36.66 
12.98 



5.00 



746.50 
238 . 22 
520 ! 00 
935.18 
53.72 



3.15 
75.00 



54.00 



24.83 



58.40 



10.25 
3500.00 
28.00 
150.00 



73.00 



21.00 



6.00 
9.00 



52.00 



$109.00$ 

166.661 
88.05 



15.24 
23.00 
76.01 
26.00 
258.74 
236.25 
25.00 
76.25 
33.00 



27.66 
50.00 
48.08 
40.00 



25.02 
45.20 
20 . 00 
3.50 
29 . 15 
17.50 

115.00 
36.00 
30.00 
33.001 

110.091 
35.00 
3.36 
58.10 
18.50 
42.09 
99.41 



123.71 
33.00 
17.20 
55.00 
3.61 
46.79 

134.18 
11.00 

136.45 

107.06 
19.00 
32.00 
27.53 
67.30 



15.00 
30.00 
15.57 



35.00 



42.00 



34.00 
14.65 
32.94 
70.00 



14.40 
46.40 



11.45 



7.00 
62.86 
8.00 
9.63 



26.75 
9.29 

11.00 

12.00 
1.50 

31.76 



56.00, 
24.001 
2.451 



10.43 
18.62 
45.00 



36.56 36.51 
27.00 28.37 
13.00: 34.32 



Total 



95.53i 
15.00' 
63.08: 
52.66 
70.92j 



$51.60 
18.00 

I 3.14 
10.00 
14.60 



51.72 



24.00 
10.00 
9.36 



5.00 
28.83 

5.00 
27.36 



22.52 
5.00 



4.80 
7.00 



5.15 
3.00 
31.74 



12.00 
31.02 



28.06 
2.50 



8.50 
5.22 
7.76 
65.65 

ii!68 



35.27 
33.10 
12.61 



58.88 



19.00 

8.001 

24.001 35.50 

1 

46.401 16.93 



< S 



1.50 
2 ."so 



$ 110.99 
161.05 
20.61 
60.00 
25.00 
28.21 
155.06 
50.04 
100.00 
100.00 
41.00 
166.45 
26.00 
83.45 
35.75 
20.00 
48.95 
22.50 
25.00 
37.00 
61.20 
64.25 
12.00 
40.15 
12.10 
25.00 
56.60 
2o.OO 
35.00 
50.00 
16.00 
40.21 
68.50 
29.00 
266.76 
65.29 
35.45 
35.86 
16.00 
3.00 
64.29 
40.00 
27.80 
25.00 
61.20 
18.10 



84.08 
76.00 
44.35 



5.00 
99.60 
22.00 
94.45 
49.48 



|14950.00| 9982.4412313.06 1456. 371678. 50|4.00| 2980.76! 2143.74 



* Last year's report, the letter havinp- been lost. 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



23 



TABLE I— FINANCIAL— (Continued.) 



CHURCHES. 



if. _C 
"Z v. 



4hoskie 

Aulander 

.Ashley's Grove 
Bethlehem .... 

Bethany 

Brantley's Grove 

Buckhorn 

Capeharfs 

Cashie 

Cashie * 

Center Grove. . . 

Chowan 

Christian Harbor 

Coleraine 

Connaritsa 

Creeksville 

Conwav 

Elam 

Galatia 

Green's X Roads 
Harrelsville .... 

Hebron 

Hillside 

Holly Grove 

Holly Springs. . . 

Jackson I 

Kelford | 

Lasker | 

Lawrence's . . . 

Lewiston 

Margarettsville 

Mars Hill 

Meherrin 

Mount Carmel. . [ 
Mount Tabor... I 
Murf reesboro . . ! 

Menola j 

Merry Hill I 

Oak Orove I 

Pine Forest. . . . ' 

Potecasi \ 

Pleasant Grove, i 
Powellsville . . . 
Republican .... 
Rich Square. . . . 

Roanoke 

Roquist 

Robert's Chapel 

Ross's 

Sandy Run 

Seaboard 

Slloam 

Severn 1 

St. John's 

Union 

Winton 

Woodland I 



138.12 

1.59.00 
29.47 
55. Ov 
45 . 75 
30.. 59 

191.50 
40.00 

100.00 

100.00 
.38 . 75 

120.00 
12.16 
89.46 
37.50 
20.00 
52.60 
25.00 
27.52 
25.00 
80. a5 
44.20 
8.00! 
40.00i 
12.00 
43.65 
66.40 
10.00 
35.00 
52.00 
20.00 

100.60 
74.50 
.36.29 
76.88 
66.001 
62.401 
12.821 
16.001 

I 



$ 3.27 
3.80 



5.40 



2.00 
10.00 



3.00 



3.00 
3.85 



5.00 



12.00 



5.00 



58.381 
52.501 
35.001 
33.00 
71.67 
10.00 



2.27 
3.00 



160.93 
40.00 
59.29 



2.25 
7.85 



9.00 



2.. 50 
132.05 
27.001 
116.481 
.55.551 
78.50 



136.87 
510.00 

11.35 
170.43 
2.40 

11.84 
340.43 

29.201 
122.03 

78.27! 

55.00 
217.06 

31.50 
121.05 

85.36 

20.00 
130.35 

92.25 

12.00; 

15.001, 

65.30i 

60.00', 



; 45.48 
140.00 



50.00 
5.00 
8.05 

90.03 



27.. 50 



85.00 



r9.60 



5.45 



35.10 

20.00 
1.52 

22.00 
5.40 
5.05 

25.00 



23.84 
20.00 

8.00 
35.00 

5.00 
15.00 
10.00 



12.00 
7.47 



27.19 
5.00 
59.50 
77.25 
39.00 
22.46 
91.00 



131.77 
46.00 
38.72 

177.66 
84.31 
51.48 
17.75 
9.40 



10.00 



.58.00 
5.06 
11.27 



99.48 
17.52 
30.00 
84.001 
70.85; 
54.34 



25.00! 
6.00 
2.00 



277.05 
17.25 
92.59 



5.00 
114.80 
10.00 
76.00 
13.36 
105.49. 



.30.00 



15.00 
11.00 
7.601 



3.00 
5.00 
6.00 
2.00 
10.00 
3.00 
5.00 
7.50 



5.00 
10.00 

e.ooi 

10.001 
15.00 

6.001 
21.81! 
lo.OOj 

7.50 



.00$ 



26.19 



;.48 



5.10 
41.67 



11.78 
5.00 
7.00 

10.00 



11.00 
5.00 
4.00 
6.00 
4.71 



4.00 
6.00 
5.00 
1.00 



2.25 
6.05 
5.00 



6.00 
10.00 

4.00 

6.28 
10.00 

4.00 



5.00 



5.00 
2.50 
8.01 
3.00 



5.00i 5.00 
10.00 5.00 
12.90 4.00 



10.00 
4.05 



5.00 
2.00 



18.70 6.16 
3.00 
10.001 10.61 



13.00 
5.50 



15.00 

4.40 
20.55 
21.00! 

5.001 3.00 



58.50 
117.10 
4.35 
77.15 



33.55 
10.00 
32.66 
5.00 



21.00 
86.00 
30.52 



1.53 
29 .'35 



3.00 
4.50 
14.50 
52.03 



90.72 
39.25 
35.00 
44.84 



40.38 
24.54 
20.00 




17.98 
46.80 
49.31 
16.02 
8.. 50 
25.00 



140.. 58! 1339.42 
52.00 523.72 
36.50 630.86 



5.92 



35.00 
90.17 
47.931 



Total I 3015.841 92.05| 4195.64 7.31. 19| .509.791297.29] 1651. 06| 44492.69 



* Last year's report, the letter having been lost. 



24 



Minu'es of the 
TABLE II— STATISTICAL. 



Church. 



vocation and Date 
of Constitution. 



Pastors. 



Clerk niid Postofiice. 



Ahoskie 

Aulnnd(M- 

Asli icv's ( ;rov<> . , 

PethlelK-in 

Pethiiny 

Rr;ii;t]ey's (irovi 

P>U' kliorn 

Cap(*liart's 

Cashie 

Center Grove. . .. 

Cliowan 

Cliristian IIar))or 

Coleraine 

Connaritsa 

Creeksville 

(^onwav 

Elain ■ 



Galatia 

Green's X Roads 
Harr(>l!svi]lc ... 

TT(<in-oii 

HilLside 

Hollv (irove . . . . 
}T()ily Spriii.ns. . . 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

I/awrence's . . . . 

Lewistpn 

Marsarettsville . 

Mars Hill 

Meherrin 

Mount Carniel . . . 
Mount Tabor. . . . 
Murfreesboro . . 

Menola 

Merry Hill 

Oak Grove 

Pine Forest 

Potecasi 

Pleasant Grove. 
Powellsville . . . . 

Republican 

Rich Square. . . . 

Roanoke 

Roquist 

Rol)ert's Chapel. 

Ross's 

Sandy Run 

Seaboard 

Siloam 

Severn 

St. John's 

Union 

'Winton 

Woodland 



Co. 



Co. 



Co. 



Hertford Co 

Pertie Co 

Voi-thai'tpton Co. 

Hertford Co 

I ei-tie i'o 

Hertford Co 

Herti')!''' Co 

i^-rtie Co 

Rprtie Co 

Bertie Co 

H<M-tford Co 

T':ertf<)rd Co 

P>ertie Co 

P>ertie Co 

Xorthaniiiton Co. 
X(M'tliar,ii>toii Co. 
Nortliauiptou Co. 
XoiThaniptun Co. 
rertie Co. . . 
Hci't^ord Co 
N'orthanipton 
Fi rtie Co. . . 
Bertie Co. . . 
Hertford Co 
Xortluunpton 
Bei-tM^ Co. . . 
Northampton 
Bertie Co. . . 
Bertie Co. . . 
Northampton 
Bertie Co. . . 
Hertford Co 
Northampton 
Hertford Co 
Hertford Co 
Hertford Co 
Bertie Co... 
Hertford Co 
Northampton Co. 
Northampton Co. 

Hertford Co 

Bertie Co 

Bertie Co 

Northampton Co. 
Xortliampton Co. 

Bertie Co 

Xortliampton Co. 

Bertie Co 

Bertie Co 

Northampton Co . 

Bertie Co 

Vorthampton Co. 

Hertford Co 

Hertford Co 

Hertford Co 

Northampton Co. 



Co. 



Co. 



1804 
1886 
1!)10 
188.-) 
1881 
1 877 

18h;i 

18--4 
1770 
18-'7 
180.-5 

178! > 
178!) i 
1892; 
190.1 
1844' 
18.7.)i 
1874 

187. "^ 
1856 

188. - 
1S04 
3907 
j88- 
1898 
1<- 
187-1 
188." 
188^ 
18.1-1 
1729 
1820 

18:«) 
184:^ 

-| o; 

1910 
1894 
1888 
1808 
1887 
1911 
1803 
1854 
1885 
1878 
1848 
1804 
1750 
1889 
1885 
1896 
1888 
1885 
1873 
1902 



CVIj. Dowell 

R.^'L. Gav 

D. Cale 

C. L. Dowell... 
T. O. Alderman 
H. F. Brinson . . 

L.v/E. Dai lev 

T. T. Speight.. 

A' 'b'. "BaVnes 

D. P. Harris... 
.T. Speight... 
J. O. Alderman 

R. L. Gav 

D. Cale 

W. B. Waff 

J. A. Speight. . . 

D. Cale 

T. T. Speight. . . 

cyv. Scott 

C^W. Scarborough 

Q. C. Davis 

F. Prinson . . 
H. F. Brinson. . 

L. A. Parker 

J. F. Cale 

D. V- C^ale 

B. Barnes. . . . 

.7. F. Cale 

W. B. Waff 

T.-^'T. Speight. . . 

C. P. Scott 

L. - A. Parker. . . . 
C. W. Scarborough 

Q. C. Davis 

C. W.S< ai-borough 
S./B. Barnes. .\ . 
C. L. Dowell... 

L. A. ' Parker .*.'.".' 
J. W. Downey . . 

C. P. Scott 

T. T. Speight. . . 
J. F. Cale 

D. Cale 



T. E. Brown, Alioskie 

W. H. Mitchell. Aulander 

J. K. Revel, Conwav 

R. J. Hoggard. Cofield 

E. E. Daniel, Coleraine 

B. F. Rarham. Ahoskie 

H. J. Vann, Como 

H. J. Ward, Merrv Hill 

W. R. Cobb, Windsor 

C. S. Godwin. Ahoskie 

T. D. Boon, Winton 

J. H. Evans, Harrellsville. . . . 

C. B. Morris, Coleraine 

J. P. Slade, Aulander 

W. H. Davis, Conway 

J. F. Martin, Conway 

J. E. Daniel, Pleasant Hill.. 
W. C. Smith. Seaboard 

G. W. Castellow. Windsor... 
A. C. Holloman, Harrellsville. 

H. T. Vann, Woodland 

D. E. White, Lewiston 

M. R. Barmer, Cremo 

C. J. Deans, Tunis 

Edwin Wright, Jackson 

C. L. L. Cobb. Kelford 

R. C. Lassiter. Lasker 

J. M. Britt, Merry Hill 

J. J. Peele, Dewiston 

Jord. Edwards,Margarettsville 

W. B. Miller, Coleraine 

J. J. Parker, Murfreesboro... 

J. G. Joyner, Seaboard 

H. P. Gatling, Ahoskie 

J. D. Babb, Murfreesboro.... 

E. C. Parker, Woodland 

D. M. Britt, Merry Hill 

S. E. Marsh, Aulander 

J. R. Carstarphen, Garysburg. 

E. B. Lassiter, Potecasi 

A. R. Harman. Aulander 

M. L. Ray nor, Powellsville... 

A. V. Cobb, Windsor 

Willie Edwards, Rich Square. 
R. W. Warren, Rich Square.. 



L. E. Dailev. . . 
J.'- A. Speight. 
J.v^W. Downey, 



IW. J. Beale, Pendleton. 
J. T. Hoggard, Windsor. 
Paul Jilcott, Roxobel. . . . 



Q. C. Davis iL. H. Speller, Windsor 

W.' B. Waff iW. H. Howell, Severn 

D. Cale IE. W. Baggett, Ahoskie 

D.i P. Harris. ... John Freeman Ahoskie 

T.w'L. Brown |W. H. Lassiter, Winton 

J. W. Downey.. Lewter McDaniel, Woodland 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 25 

TABLE II— STATISTICAL— (Continued.) 



CHURCH. 



o 



Ahoskie ,2nd 

Aulander 1-2 

Ashley's Grove '2nd 

Bethleliem ilst- 

Bethany ,2nd 

Brantley's Grove 2nd 

Buckhorn 2nd 

€apehart's |lst- 

Cashie 1-2 

Center Grove 2nd 

Chowan !lst- 

■Christian Harbor |2nd 

Coleraine |lst- 

Connaritsa '3rd 

Creeksville '2nd 

<I!onway ilst- 

Elam ' i3rd 

Galatia 3rd 

Green's X Roads I^^i'fi 

HarrellsvlIIe I^th 

Hebron 1 4th 

Hillside 

Holly Grove list 

Holly Springs 3rd 

Jackson jlst 

Xolford '3rd 

Lasker |4th 

Lawrence's jlst 

Lewiston 2nd 

Margarettsville list 

Mars Hill '4th 

Meherrin I . . . . 

Mount Carmel 4th 

Mount Tabor 1st- 

Murf reesboro I . . . . 

Menola ., 

Merry Hill 

Oak Grove 

Pine Forest 

Potecasi 

Pleasant Grove. . . 

Powellsville 

Republican , 

Rich Square 

Roanoke , 

Roquist 

Robert's Chapel.., 

Ross's , 

'iandy Run , 

Seaboard 

Riloam 

!^evern , 

St. John's 

TTnion , 

AYinton 

Woodland 



-4th 
-3-4 

3rd 

-4th 
3rd. 

-3-4 

3rd 
3rd 

3rd 



t> O P-i 



$5000 
4500 
2500 
3000 
1200 
1500 
6000 
1000 

200 
1000 
3000 
1500 
5000 
2000 
1.500 
3578 
1000 
1500 

500 
2000 



3rd 



Total 



2nd 
4th 
2nd- 
1st 
2nd 
2nd 
2nd 
2nd 
2nd- 
4th 



4th 



4th 



3000.00 
1250.00 
30(J0 . 00 
.3500.00 
3000.00 
1500.01) 
2500.00 
1000.001 
3000.00 
1500.00 



2000.00 
2000.00 



1200.00 
1200.00 
800.00 
2000.00 



700 
700 

500 
450 
5001 
500 1 
5001 
6001 
6501 
400 1 
350 1 
400 

'566 

'766 
500 
500 
300 
2.50 



400 
300 
300 
000 
400 
250 
500 
400! 
300 



800 
250 



500 
500 
500 
600 



1 3000.001 500 

I 3500.001 

I 2250. 00 I 4001 
I 1650.001 4001 
I i. .. . 



10 


8 


2i 


6 


10 


18 


8 


5 


7 


9 


4 


4 




4 



3[ 



16 



Ist- 
4th 
4th 



3rd 



I 2000.001 600f 
1 3000.00 1000 
I 2500.00 500 



3rd 

2ud- 

ist 

2nd- 

2ud- 

1st- 



-4th 

-4th 
-4th 
3rd 



! 1100.00 

I 2000.00 

I 1500.00 

I 2500.00 

I 2500.00 



200 
400 
500 
300 
400 



24 



I 1600.001 400 1 



• I 1 
,1 3 
3 
3 
1: 
11 



17 



Re.-^tored. 


5 B 


Excluded. 1 


Died. 1 

1 


1 

] '-' • 
'Z . ' a! ^ 

;3 a; 1 p 2 


d 

OJ 




1 


13 


4 


1 


151 


281 


432 


4 


7 


9 


1 


157 


198 


.'^55 










97 


79 


176 


1 


4 


2 


1 


78 


114 


192 


1 








130 


164 


294 


1 


7 


4 


2 


95 


98 


19.3 




18 


6 


1 


122 


]03 


225 


""2 


4 


1 


3 


128 


180 


308 




12 




4 


148 


198 


346 


'2 


7 




1 


92 


97 


189 




10 




3 


52 


72 


12-1 


' "3 


7 


' "2 




83 


79 


162 


1 


6 


5 


" " '3 


180 


207 


387 


1 


8 


5 


5 


147 


180 


327 


1 


13 


2 


2 


76 


71 


147 




3 


1 


1 


94 


80 


183 






2 


1 


110 


188 


2U8 


10 


4 


1 


3 


158 


195 


353 




4 


5 




124 


]23 


259 




5 




' "6 


69 


72 


141 


6 15 






02 


73 


135 




6 


7 


4 


46 


45 


91 




3 




4 


63 


82 


145 




2 




1 


36 


45 


81 








1 


43 


47 


90 




3 


2 


3 


85 


11.2 


197 




4 


2 


1 


70 


75 


145 




19 


2 


3 


113 


122 


235 




2 


6 


4 


123 


123 


246 




2 






22 


30 


52 


.... 


13 




7 


218 


225 


443 




8 


. . 


3 


163 


154 


317 




8 




3 


97 


125 


222 


:::: 


2 


"'3 


2 


126 


170 


296 




5 






44 


by 


113 

86 




2 




1 


50 


36 




1 




2 


67 


63 


130 


"'2 


3 


' '12 


1 


47 


75 


122 


1 








20 


33 


53 


1 


10 


4 


2 


141 


116 


257 


2 


12 


1 


2 


120 


181 


301 


1 


2 




3 


38 


43 


81 




9 


* "i 




180 


237 


417 


■ "3 


6 




" '"i 


106 


125 


231 




12 


■ "i 




33 


55 


88 




15 


3 


4 


94 


151 


245 




6 


1 


3 


354 


484 


838 


' "'i 


3 




2 


164 


220 


384 




3 


2 


2 


52 


55 


107 




8 




1 


77 


67 


147 




10 


""4 


2 


64 


77 


141 


2 


4 


7 


3 


73 


84 


157 




23 


6 




60 


83 


148 




13 


2 




64 


85 


149 



,| 284| 275| 62| 373] 114| 105|5405|6557|11962 



26 



Minutes of the 
TABLE III— SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 



CHURCH. 



iO H 



Be 

c ^ 



S -2 S ft I 



■2 & 



205 
150 
100 
86 
98 
140 
80 
107 
190 
85 
70 
83 
119 
86 
120 



217 
161 
112 
98 
107 
150 
88 
114 
203 
92 
77 
93 
129 
96 
134 



103 
70 
99 
65 
82 



111 
80 

106 
73 
92 



Ahoskie i 12 

Aulander , 11 

Ashley's Grove 12 

Bethlehem I 12 

Bethany 

Brantley's Grove. . . 

Buckhorn 

Capeharfs 

Cashie 

Center Grove 

Chowan 

Christian Harbor... 

Coleraine 

Connaritsa 

Creeksville 

Conway 

Blam 

Galatia 

Green's X Roads. . . 

Harrellsville 

Hebron 

Hillside 

Holly Grove 

Holly Springs 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Lawrence's 

Lewistou 

Margaiettsville .... 

Mars Hill 

Meherrin 

Mount Carmel 

Mount Tabor 

Murfreesboro 

Menola 

Merry Hill 

Oak Grove 

Pine Forest 

Potecasi 

Pleasant Grove 

Powellsville 

Republican 

Rich Square 

Roanoke 

Roquist 

Robert's Chapel 

Ross's 

Sandy Run 

Seaboard 

Siloam 

Severn 

St. John's 

Union 

Winton 

Woodland 

■ TotaT; 56815423159911 , 



80 
80 
32 
120 
135 
47 
240 
49 
125 
70 
87 
81 
120 
70 
63 
50 
15 
145 
47 
122 
125 
150 
47 



70 
432 
165 



154 
84 

102 
68 

110 



89 
89 
40 
128 
145 
54 
253 
58 
136 
841 
95 
93 
141 
77 
72 
56 
18 
158 
551 
1301 
1441 
1611 
531 



50 
25 

217 
50 
90 

148 
50 



80 



53 



250 
131 
160 
177 
182 
153 
110 
120 
120 

80 
102 
668 
100 
100 
150 
1331 

65 
100 

95 

90 



50 

'566 
54 

'56 
110 
38 
90 
40 
82 
50 
100 



44 



104 
125 
300 
155 
125 

38 
394 

85 
350 
120 
111 
147 
250 

80 
4 

48 



163 



102 

300 
100 



1 . . . 
1 . . . 
1 ... 
1 . . . , 

1! VA 



1401 
205 
200 
60 



192 

3081 
2371 



157 
135 
87 
56 
80 
100 
49 
75 
90 
50 
65 
48 
60 
39 
75 
85 
34 
40 
60 
34 
58 



12 
12 

121 90 



12 



300 
124 
92 
188 



39 



80 
115 



$104.43 
90.00 



30.18 
2.40 
7.52 

98.43 



$123.71 
33.00 
17.00 
55.00 
3.61 
48.79 
30.18 



64.42 
2.00 
165.00 
27.03 



136.45 
19.00 
32.00 
27.53 
67.30 



75.00 
69.85 



30.00 
7.57 



8.85 
30.00 
35.00 



35.00 



42.00 



32.88 
8.75 



81.89 



34.00 
14.65 
32.94 
70.00 



73.87 



62.86 



71.53 
15.00 
31.72 
93.71 
75.10 
41.48 
10.90 



.63 



60.30 
2.27 
35.58 
19.20 



80.60 



159.05 
17.25 
78.59 



75.78 



24. { 



86.00 
5 7.54 
41 77.49] 46.40 



26.75 



31.76 



20.18 
18.62 



2.40 
28.37 
24.32 



19.00 



I I 150|1996. 6011172. 8213169. 42 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 

TABLE III— SUNDAY SCHOOLS— (Continued.) 



27 



Church. 



Lhoskie , 

^ulander 

^shley's Grove.., 

Bethleliem , 

ietliany 

Brantley's Grove. 

[Snckhorn 

papehart's 

pashie 

Center Grove 

bhowan 

phristian Harbor. 

Coleraine 

vOnnaritsa , 

Preeksville 

Ponway 

Clam 

Jalatia 

Green's X Roads. 
3arrellsville . . . . 

lebron 

lillside 



p^olly Grove. . . . 
iolly Springs. . . 

■ackson 

Telford 

Liasker 

jawrenee s . . . . 

iewiston 

largarettsville 

lars Hill 

leherrin 

lount Carmel. . 
lount Tabor. . . 
lurfreesboro . . 

fenola 

lerry Hill 

>ak Grove , 

*ine Forest 

'otecasi 

'leasant Grove, 
'owellsville . . . , 
republican . . . . , 

^ich Square 

loanoke 

ioquist . ...... 

Robert's Chapel. 

:oss's 

andy Run 

eaboard 



iloam 
evcrn . . 
t. John's 
nion . . . 
Hnton . . 
i^oodland 



Superintendent. 



W. h. Curtis.... 

Herbert Jenkins. 

C. R. Revel 

R. J. Hoggard. . . 

J. M. Perry 

S. A. Dilday.... 
R. A. Majette. . . 

H. J. Ward 

J. H. Mathews. . 
C. S. Godwin... 

J. E. Vann 

N. S. Hoggard. 
E. B. Forehand. 

J. S. Jenkins 

Edwin Lassiter. . 

A. Lassiter 

C. L. Stephenson, 

J. W. Rose 

Dancy Dempsey., 

B. F. Williams... 
J. P. GrifBn 



J. J. Taylor 

K. R. Israel 

P. J. Long 

J. E. Tyler 

W. R. Bridgers. . 
J. W. Culapher. 

W. J. Barnes 

J. E. Piland 

J. C. Miler ., 

J. K. Parker 

T. J. Stephenson. 

W. Boone 

J. B. Barnacasal. , 
H. W. Griffith.... 

J. T. Keeter 

A. E. Saunders. . . 

L. A. Jordan 

C. G. Powell 

J. S. Hughes. . . . . 
W. C. Mathews.. 

J. R. Byiium 

A. Vann 

W. P. Nelson 



J. E. Johu.son. , 
Worley Cowan. 
S. J. Gillikin. . . 



Postofflce. 



Ahoskie 

Aulander 

Conway 

Cofield 

Coleraine .... 

Ahoskie , 

Como 

Merry Hill 

Windsor 

Ahoskie 

Win ton 

Harrellsville . , 

Coleraine 

Aulander 

Conway 

Conway 

Gumberry . . . . 
Margarettsville 

Windsor 

Harrellsville . . 
Woodland 



Cremo 

Tunis 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Merry Hill 

Lewiston 

Margarettsville 

Coleraine 

Murf reesboro . . 

Seaboard 

Winton 

Murfreesboro . . 

Woodland 

Merry Hill 

Aulander 

Garysburg 

Potecasi 

Woodland 

Powellsville . . . 

Windsor 

Rich Square... 
Rich Square... 



Pendleton 
Windsor . , 
Roxobel 



George H. Tyler. 
R. L. Edwards. . . 

W. A. Miller 

V. Turner 

C. H. Griffin 



Severn . . 
Aulander 
Ahoskie . 
Winton . . 
Woodland 



1 





Minutes of the 


Text. 


Romans 1:16. 
Acts 20:24. 
Psalms 16:8. 
Hebrews 13:1. 
Acts 20:35. 
Galatiaus 6:10. 
Galatians 6:10. 
Romans 8:1. 
Habakkuk 2:15. 
Numbers 13:30. 
Colossians 2:10. 
Colossians 1:28. 
Romans 15:1, 2, 3. 
E])h. 1:37, 18, 10. 20. 
Acts 5:29, 30, 31. 
Romans 5:8; 8:32. 
Galatians 6:14. 
Joel 3:14. 15, 16. 
Hebrews 4:6. 
2 Corinthians 9:6, 7. 
Revelations 3:7 to 11. 
Ex. 10:16; 28:19, 20. 
Matt. 3:19; 26:26-28. 
Hebrews 13:1. 
Psalms 60:4. 
Song of Solomon 5:16. 
Matthew 16:27. 
1 Corinthians 15:3. 
John 6:67-69. 
James 2:8. 


Preacher of the 
Introductory Sermon. 


. . . J. D. Hufham 

. . . C. W. Scarborough. . . 
. . . C. W. Scarborough... 

. . . B. B. Williams 

. . . M. L. Green 

... C. W. Scarborough . . 
. . . T. G. Wood 

. . . L .M. Curtis 

. . . A. Cree 

.. . R. D. Cross 

. . . — . — . McKaughn. . . . 
... W. P. Jordan 

. . . R. D. Cross 

... G. P. Harrill 

. . . D. Cale . 

. . . L. M. Curtis 

. . . A. T. Howell 

. .. W. L. Britt 

. . . M. A. Adams 

... R. L. Gay 

... A. T. tlowell 

... R. D. Stephenson.... 

. . . L. A. Parker 

... T. L. Brown 


i 

• 


■. C. Parker 

. C. Parker 

. C. Parker 

. C. Parker 

. C. Parker 

. C. Parker 

. C. I'arker 

. C. Parker 

. 1 ai Kei 

. C. Parker 

. C. Parker 

. C. I'arker 

. C. Parker 

. R. Raynor 

. R. Raynor 

. R. Raynor 

. R. Raynor 

W. Britton 

. W. Bi-itton 

, W. Britton 

W. Britton.... 

. W. Britton 

, W. Britton 

. W. Britton.... 

. W. Britton 

, W. Britton 

, W. Britton.... 

, W. Britton 

, W. Britton 

. W. x^ritton 






Moderator. 


Thomas 

Thomas 

'. Thouiiis 

'. Tiiomas 

'. Thomas 

'. Thomiis 

Thomas 

'. Tlioiuas 

\ Thomas 

Thom;is 

*. Thomas 

Thomas 

'. Thomas 

*. Thomas 

'. Scarboro. . . . 
'. Scarboro. . . . 
'. Scarboro. . . . 

V. Mitchell 

V. Mitchell. .. . 
V. Mitchell. .. . 
V. Mitchell 

Mitchell. .. . 
V. Mitchell. .. . 

V. Mitchell 

P. Shaw 

P. Shaw 

Milam 

Milam 

Milam 

Milam 







West Chowan Baptist Association. 29* 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION OF THE WEST 
CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



At the Baptist Church of Lewiston, N. C, July 31, 1912, the 18th annual 
session of the Woman's Missionary Union of the West Chowan Association, 
was called to order by its President, Mrs. Clifton T. Parker. 

The congregation sang "Blest Be The Tie That Binds," and Mrs. J. W. 
Downey, of Woodland, conducted the devotional exercises of the hour. 

At the close of this, Mrs. T. H. Bridgers, of Lewiston, in behalf of the 
Woman's Missionary Society, made a most cordial address of welcome. Mrs,_ 
V\ . T. Benthall, of Woodland, in behalf of the Union, made the response. 

A song was sung, and the Minutes read and approved. There being no 
old business, and nothing new to come before the Union, our President gave 
her report, and earnestly insisted that we plan for larger work. That the 
Societies aim to reach all the points on the standard of" excellence, that we 
strive to attend our division of the Missionary Institutes, also thai each 
Society make an effort to observe the three special offerings to Home, 
State and Foreign Missions. 

After the Treasurer's report, :Mrs. .J. P. Holoman, of Rich Square, read a 
paper in which she gave a full and interesting report of the Monroe meet- 
ing. 

Miss Blanche Barrus, our Corresponding Secreiarv, explained and empha- 
sized the importance of the standard of excellence. 

On a motion made by Miss Nellie Lambertson and seconded bv Mrs. Miller, 
of Lnion, the Union voted that a telegram of condolence be sent Mrs Nettie 
Owen Freeman, our Vice-President, expressing our deep svmnathv' in the 
loss of her mother. 

In the absence of Mrs. Freeman, her paper, "Facts Concerning Home For- 
eign and State Missions," was read by Miss Nettie Britt, of Union in which 
she gave us a comprehensive view of what our :Mission Boards are doing 
A song, "More Love to Thee, O Christ," w:.s sung, then Mrs Celey of 
Menola, read a paper entitled: "Responsibility of Woman's Afissionarv 'so- 
cieties to Junior Organizations." 

"Is Fighting Worth While?" was the subject of a paper read bv Mrs C W 
Poirell, of Potecasi. ^ ' 

_ The writer insisted that we go to the Bible to find out how to give as there 
IS no other method oatside the Book. 

'How We Make Our r^Ioney," was the subject of our Round Table dis- 

CUSSIOII. 

After appointing the committees, a hearty invitation to dinner was offered 
ihe Doxology was then sung, and the morning session was brought to a 
close with a fervent prayer offered by Mrs. J. P. Holomon, of Rich Square. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 
The hospitality of Lewiston was clearly expressed in the dinner spread for 

X^lr^^l:^^''' °' ^^^^ an 

Miss Pearl Bryant, of Rich Square, in behalf of the Y. W A's made the 
lunbeams '""^^ ^'^''^ Harrington, of Lewiston, welcomed Te 

cfll^ao^lZT%^^^'^ H ^^'^^^^ ^^^''^ Blanchard and Elsie Blenthall. 

Thf v ^?- ^^ ^^-^"^ ^^^t^ ^P^^ial ^^sic bv the choir 

ine Y. \\. A. and Sunbeam leaders were called on for two-minute talks 



30 



Minutes of the 



to which they responded. The key note seemed to be a plea for more 
encouragement along missionary lines on the part of the parents for their 
children. 

Miss Blanche Barrus, of Raleigh, delighted the Union with an instructive 
talk on "The West Chowan Association as compared with other Associations 
and its possibilities as viewed by a Central Committee Member." In her 
talk she showed that the West Chowan is not doing the work it ought. We 
are only giving $50 per Society, while some other Associations with a smaller 
number of Societies are giving more. She showed us that something must 
be done to arouse our women. 

An intermission of five minutes was then given. 

The Union was again called to order by the singing of "Onward, Christian 
Soldiers." 

Miss Laura Cox a missionary from Mexico, made an interesting address 
on "Our W^ork in Mexico." Our women realized as never before the great 
need of carrying the gospel to the benighted Mexican. 

The report of the committee on Statistics told that the Woman's Mission- 
ary Society of Winton, leads the Union in finance, giving $6.93 per member, 
and Union Sunbeams lead, giving $3.11 per member. Ahoskie has second 
place in the Woman's Missionary Society, and Chowan Church second place 
in Sunbeam Band. 

On motion, the report was adopted, and will be printed in the Minutes 
of the West Chowan Association. 

The committee on Time and Place gave the following: Cashie Baptist 
Church, last WvCdnesday in July, 1913. 

MRS. J. F. CALE, 
MRS. PETE FUTRELL, 
MISS SUE COBB, i 
Committee. m 

The report was not adopted. » ■ 

The Union, with the consent of the committee, decided that since it had 
been a custom for some time for the Union to hold its meetings only every 
thr^e j^ears in the same county, by right, the next session would be in Hert- 
ford County. There being a most cordial invitation from Union, the com- 
mittee reconsidered their decision and voted in favor of Union. 

Mrs. J. P. Holomon made a motion that there be inserted in our Consti- 
tution a clause to this effect: "That our Union will hold its meetings in the 
same county only every three years." 

The motion was adopted. 

The committee on Nominations made the following report: 
"The committee on Nominations, believing that the furtherance of our 
Associational work, and the development of God's Kingdom in our own land, 
depend upon earnest, interested and willing workers, beg to submit the fol- 
lowing names: For President, Mrs. C. T. Parker; for Vice-President, Mrs. 
John Freeman; for Secretary and Treasurer, Miss Willie Lambertson. 

MUSS ELIZABETH PRITCHARD, 
MRS. J. W. HOGGARD, 
MRS. P. H. OVERTON, 

Committee. 

This report was adopted. 

On motion of Mrs. Miller, of Union, the committee on Obituaries sub- 
mitted the following report: "We, your committee, appointed to make suit- 
able memorial to our 'sainted dead,' for the past year, beg leave to submit 
the following names: Mtrs. W. P. Taylor, Chowan; Mrs. Bettie Tillman, 
Cashie; Mrs. W. L. Lyon, Cashie; Mrs. T. P. Freeman, Cashie; Miss Martha 
Beal, Union; Mrs. Bettie Harmon, Holly Grove; Mrs. Louisa Boyette, 
Hebron. Believing and knowing that our Heavenly Father doeth all things 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



31 



well, and for His own honor and glory, we humbly submit to His will, 
praying that when our summons comes we may also be ready. 

MRS. L. g. HOLLOMON, 
MUS. MATTIB JENKINS, 
MRS. BESSIE GREEN, 
MRS. J. C. SCARBORO, 
MRS. D. P. HARRIS, 

Committee. 

This report was adopted. 

After carefully considering the matter, the Unibn decided that we were 
very much in need of a Y. W. A. and Sunbeam superintendent, whose duty 
it snould be to organize new Societies. This leader was found in Miss Eliza- 
beth Pritchard, of Aulander, who was unanimously elected. 

After singing the Doxology, the Union adjourned with prayer by Mirs. C. T. 
Parker. 

EVENING SESSION. 

At the evening session the Union came to order with the singing of "Holy, 
Holy." 

The devotional exercises were led by Mr. F*. Craig. Wle were then favored 
with a solo by Miss Effie Mizzell. 

At the close of this, Mir. Craig introduced the speaker of the evening. Rev. 
Q. C. Davis, of Windsor. In his usual way, Mr. Davis held the undivided 
^ittention of his audience. The Union was indeed fortunate in securing such 
an able speaker. 

After the address, a solo was sung by Mrs. Johnson, of Lewiston. 
A collection being taken the following resolutions were read: We, the 
undersigned, submit the following resolutions: 

1. That we, the Woman's Missionary Union of West Chowan Association, 
extend hearty thanks to the people of Lewiston for their generous hospitality 
and the pleasure and enjoyment that we have received at their hands while 
with them. 

2. That we extend thanks to Miss Blanche Barrus, our Corresponding Sec- 
retary, and Miss Laura Cox, our missionary in Mexico, for the valuable infor- 
mation and the inspiration that they gave us in their talks which were real 
spiritual feasts. 

3. That we extend thanks to our speaker. Rev. Q. C. Davis, for his very 
instructive and helpful address. 

4. That we extend thanks to those who have added to our enjoyment by 
their music. 

5. That we extend thanks to our Secretary and Vice-President for their 
untiring efforts in making our Union do more and better things for the King- 
dom, and that we co-operate with them in the work and support them by our 
prayers. 

6. To all who have given a hand in the work in any way, we extend thanks, 
and we feel that it has been good to be here. 

MRS. J. M. ELEY, 
MRS. GEORGE BROWNE, 
MISS MATTIE SYKES, 
Committee. 

When this report was adopted, a song was sung, and benediction pro- 
nounced, and a most interesting and helpful session of our Woman's Mis- 
sionary Union of the West Chowan Association, closed. 

MARY ELIZABETH PARKER, 

President. 

WILLIE VIRGINIA LAMBERTSON, 

Secretary and Treasurer. 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETIES— STATISTICS. 



Churches. 



Ahoskie 

Aulander 

Ashley's Grove. . . 
Brantley's Grove. 

Capeharfs 

Chowau 

Coleraiue 

Cashie 

Creeksville 

Coil way 

Buckhorii 

Galatia 

Hebron 

Harrellsville 

Hoily Grove 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Lawrence's 

Lewiston 

Murf reesboro . . . 

Meherrin 

Mount Carmel . . . 
Mount Tabor. . . . 

Mars Hill 

Menola 

Merry Hill 

Potecasi 

Pleasant Grove. 

Roanoke 

Robert's Chapel. 
Republic 



Rich Square. 
Sandy Run . . . 

Severn 

St. John's. . . 

Union 

-Win ton 

Woodland . . . 



Presidents and Postoffices. 



Mrs. T. E. Brown. Ahoskie 

Miss Blanche Pritchard, Aulander 

Annie D. Joyner. Conway 

Mrs. J. W. Overton. Ahoskie 

Susie R. Cable, Merry Hill 

Mrs W. P. Shaw, Winton 

Mrs. F. E. Beaseley. Coleraine. . . 

Mrs. L. F. Pierce, Windsor 

Maude Davis, Conway 

Mrs. W. B. Waff. Conway 

Mrs. E. T. Harden, Como 

Mrs. C. W. Taylor, Seaboard 

Mrs. W. A. Futrell, Conway 

Mrs. J. T. Williams, Harrellsvile : . 

Lillie D. Holloman, Cremo 

]N[rs. S. J. Calvert, Jackson 

Mrs. W. Harrell, Kelford 

Mrs. Annie Whims, Lasker 

Ijizzie Langdale, Merry Hill 

Mr^. H. B. Clark, Lewiston 

jNIrs. 1). A. Day, Murf reesboro 

i.^rs. J. R. Parker. Murfreesboro 

Miss Bettie McGlaughan, Seaboard 

Mrs. E. B. Vanghan, Winton 

Clara M. Pigg, Coleraine 

Mrs. H. G. Snipes, Woodland 

Nellie Bo wen, Merry Hill 

Mrs. C. G. PoAvell, Potecasi 

Mattie Jenkins, Aulander I 

Ola Hedgpeth, Rich Square 

Mrs. W. J. Beale, Pendleton 



Mrs. J. P. Lassiter, Rich Square. 

Mrs. G. L. Harrell, Roxobel 

Mrs. J. T. Long, Severn 

Mrs. W. P. Britton, Aulander 

i\,rs. Emma Miller, Ahoskie 

Mrs. S. P. Tavlor, Winton 

Mrs. C. G. Parker, Woodland 



SUNBEAM'S— STATISTICS. 



Churches. 



Ahoskie 

Aulander 

Ashley's Grove, 

Chowan 

Coleraine 

Cashie 

Buckhorn .... 

Hebron 

Holly Grove. . . 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Murfreesboro . 
Mount Tabor. . 

Menola 

Potecasi 

Republican . . . 
Rich Square.. 

Sandy Run 

Severn 

Union 

Winton 

Woodland .... 



Presidents and Postoffices. 



Mrs. C. C. Hoggard, Ahoskie... 

Vera Britton, Aulander 

T. C. Revel. Conway 

Miss Lillian Shaw, Winton 

Mrs. D. R. Britton, Coleraine.. 
Mrs. E. H. Taylor, Windsor.. 

Georgie Harrell, Como 

Georgia Vann, Woodland 

Sallie Vaughan, Powellsville. . . 

Miss C. Parker, Kelford 

Miss Nita Lassiter, Lasker 

Grace Pearce, Murfreesboro 

Eldo Whitley, Winton 

Henry Brown, Woodland 

Cornelia Beale, Potecasi 

Kate Ward, Windsor 

Everet Hunter, Rich Square 

Sallie Castellow, Roxobel 

Mrs. J. W. Hoggard, Severn... 
Miss Mary Lawrence. Ahoskie. 
Miss Pearl Jenkins, Winton.... 
Miss Ethel Futrell, Woodland. , 



MINUTES 



OF THE 

Thirty-First Annual Session 

OP THE 

West Chowan 

Baptist Association, 

HELD WITH 

Severn Baptist Church, Northampton Co., 

October 28th, 29th and 30th, 1913. 
t 

The next session will be held with Harrellsville Church, Hertford 
County, beginning on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October, 
1914, To preach Introductory sermon, W, B. Waff; L. E. Dailey, 
Alternate. 



GOLDSBORO, N. C. 
NASH BROS., PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 



State Missions — L. E. Dailey, P. M. Fleetwood, J. H. White. 
Home Missions — C. W. Scarborough, J. H. Stephenson, A. J. Parker. 
Foreign Missions — M. P. Davis, J. G. Joyner, J. W. Boone. 
Ministers Relief— J. T. Williams, S. C. Godwin, W. P. Willoughby. 
Education— D. Gale, J. S. Gay, J. C. Britt. 
Sunday Schools — D. P. Harris, W. Watson, J. F. Gale. 
Orphanage— T. T. Speight, J. L. Futrell, W. D. McGlaughan. 
Ghowan Gollege — J. B. Vann, J. D. Jenkins, Josiah Earley. 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS. 

Dancy Gale Potecasi, N, C. 

C. L. Dowell Ahoskie, N. C. 

S. B. Barnes Merry Hill, N. C. 

G. W. Scarborough Murfreesboro, N. C. 

T. T. Speight Windsor, N. G. 

R. T. White Gonway, N. C. 

J. R. Mathews Aulander N. G. 

H. F. Brinson Tunis, N. C. 

Q. G. Davis Murfreesboro, N. G. 

J. F. Gale Roxobel, N. G. 

L. A. Parker Menola, N. G. 

John Barnes Pendleton, N. G. 

W. B. Waff Gonway, N. G. 

D. P. Harris Windsor, N. G. 

L. E. Dailey Gomo, N. G. 

W. F. Gale Windsor, N. G. 

J. W. Downey Woodland, N. C. 

*J. O. Alderman Edenton, N. G. 

*T. S. Grutchfield Gatesville, N. C. 

E. F. Sullivan Murfreesboro, N. C. 

R. B. Lineberry Goleraine, N. C. 



OFFICERS: 



T. Gillam, Moderator Windsor, N. G.. 

J. S. Mitchell, Vice-Moderator Winton, N. G. 

N. W. Britton, Glerk Winton, N. G. 

R. P. Thomas, Treasurer Goffield, N. C. 

R. B. Lineberry, Historian Goleraine, N. C. 



The officers constitute the Executive Committee of the Association. 
*Pastors but not residing in the Association. 



CONSTITUTION. 



Name. 

Article 1. This body shall be known as the North Carolina West Chowan 
Baptist Association. 

Membership. 

Art. 2. It shall be composed of messengers elected by the churches con- 
nected with this body, and all ordained ministers who are members or pas- 
tors of said churches, together with the officers of this Association, and 
chairmen of all standing committees. Bach church of one hundred members 
and under shall be entitled to two messengers, and for each additional one 
hundred members, an additional messenger: Provided, That no church shall 
have more than four messengers. 

Objects. 

Art. 3. The objects shall be to devise and recommend measures for increas- 
ing the harmony, the intelligence and the spiritual power of the churches, 
and for developing and directing their energies, their resources and their 
gifts, in advancing the Redeemer's kingdom in the earth. 

Powers and Prerogatives. 

Art. 4. The Association shall have no power to infringe upon the sov- 
ereignty or rights of the churches. It is neither an ecclesiastical nor legisla- 
tive council, nor court of appeal. It may advise the churches and recommend 
measures of usefulness for their adoption, but can not bind them in any way. 
Yet, in view of the combined wisdom, piety and intelligence of the body, it 
may justly claim for itself, for its objects and for its recommendations the 
very highest consideration and regard. 

Art. 5. The Association may dissolve connection with any church that 
becomes heterodox in doctrine, or disorderly in practice, or that fails to 
represent itself, either by messenger or letter, more than two successive 
sessions, without sufficient reasons, or that treats with contempt its objects 
and requirements, or upon application of a church for dismission. 

Rights of the Churches. 

Art. 6. Each individual church shall hold and exercise all the functioiis 
of an independent church of Jesus Christ. As constituent members of this 
Association, the churches shall have right to advise, when desired, in case 
of difficulty, and to suggest plans of usefulness to be adopted. It shall be. 
the undisputed privilege of any church to withdraw its membership from 
this Association whenever it shall so elect. 

Duties of the Churches. 

Art. 7. It shall be the duty of the churches to appoint as messengers, as 
far as practicable, their most capable members, to require their attendance, 
and to send by them a contribution to the Association fund to pay for print- 
ing the minutes and other necessary expenses. 

Art. 8. It shall be the duty of each church to send an annual letter to the 
Association, giving: (1) Locality; (2) the names of its pastor and clerk and 
their respective postoffices; (3) the Sabbaths of regular service; (4) the 
church statistics, including the number baptized, received by letter, restored, 
dismissed, deceased, expelled, and aggregate membership, male and female; 
(5) Sabbath School statistics; (6) amount contributed to benevolent objects 
and the Association Fund; (7) names of messengers and alternates; (8) any 
other information deemed of special importance. 

Organization. 

Art. 9. The officers of this Association shall be a Moderator, Vice-Modera- 
tor, Clerk, Treasurer, and Historian, who shall be elected at each annual 
session, from the members of the Association, and shall continue in office 
until the next annual election, which election shall be the next order of 



Constitution. 



5 



business after the enrollment of messengers. As soon as the new officers 
shall have taken their seats, the body shall be declared organized and pre- 
pared for business. 

Duties of Officers. 

Art. 10. It shall be the duty of the Moderator to open the meetings punc- 
tually at time appointed; to enforce the rules; to preserve order, and to 
exercise all the prerogatives of a presiding officer, according to the principles 
of parliamentary usage. 

Art. 11. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Moderator to discharge the duties 
of the Moderator in his absence. 

Art. 12, It shall be the duty of the Clerk to keep a faithful record of the 
proceedings of the body, and superintend the printing and distribution of 
same, and to keep on file the printed Minutes and other important documents 
belonging to the body. He may appoint an assistant when necessary. 

Art, 13. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive and disburse the 
money contributed to the Minute Fund, as directed by the body, and make 
an annual report of same. 

Art. 14, It shall be the duty of the Historian, who shall be elected at each 
annual meeting of the body, to prepare for publication in the Minutes an 
historical sketch of the church with which the Association meets with 
obituaries, incidents, and other facts of the year, that should be preserved; 
and make report to the next Association, 

Art. 15. This Constitution may be altered at any annual session of the 
body by a vote of two thirds of the members present. 

Resolved, 1, That no church shall be entitled to representation in this body 
unless in perfect accord with the Constitution thereof, that fact to be ascer- 
tained by a committee of five on credentials, appointed at each session of 
the body immediately after organization, 

2. The report of this committee shall be the property of the Association 
just as any other report, (Adopted 1898,) 

Resolved, That henceforth this Association withdraw fellowship from any 
church that allows its members to engage in the manufacture and sale of 
intoxicating liquors as a beverage. (1891.) 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this Association that selling intoxicating 
liquors through a dispensary is a violation of the spirit and letter of the 
resolution of our Constitution. (1905.) 



RULES OF ORDER. 

1. The Association shall convene annually at the time and place of its 
own adjournment. 

2. During each annual session it shall meet and adjourn from day to day 
at the hours fixed upon by the body, 

3. All meetings of the Association shall be opened and closed with religious 
I exercises. 

I 4, A majority of the members present shall be a quorum for the transac- 
j tion of business, 

j 5. No member shall absent himself temporarily without leave of the Mod- 

!| erator, nor finally without leave of the body, 

6, No member shall speak more than twice on the same subject without 
permission of the body. 

; 7. No member shall be allowed to talk, stand up, read or move about the 

I house during business, except to gain or impart information under considera- 
tion. 

8. No committee shall be in session during the hour of business without 
I permission from the body. 

I 9, All questions of order not herein provided for shall be decided by 
Mell's Parliamentary Practice. 



6 



Order of Business. 



ORDER OF BUSINESS. 

First Day. 

11:00 a. m— Introductory Sermon. 
12:00 m. — Enroll delegates. 

l- S-Orgfntze, read Constitution; call names of churches that failed 
2.00 p. m. urga ^^^^^^^^^ themselves at last session; receive new 

churches; invite visitors; appoint Committees. 
2:45 p. m.— Sunday Schools. 

3- 15 p. m.— Orphanage. 

4 - .00 p. m.— Assignment of Homes. 

Adjournment. 

Second Day. 

9- 30 a m.— Devotional Exercises. 

9:45 a. m.— Report on Church Statistics. 
10*00 a. m. — Chowan College. 
.{.QQ a m.— Report on Foreign Missions. 
12 -.00 m. —Report on State Missions. 

1:00 p. m.— Recess. 

2- 40 p. m.— Report on Education. 

3- 00 p. m.— Home Missions. 

4': 00 p. m.— Miscellaneous Business. 
Adjournment. 

Third Day. 
9-30 a. m.— Devotional E'xercises. 

9:45 a', m.— Routine Business. ^ 

10- 00 a. m.— Ministers' Relief. 
11:00 a. m.— Report of Committees. 
12*00 m. — Miscellaneous Business. 

Adjournment. ^ ^ SCARBOROUGH, 

D P. HARRIS, 

T. T. SPEIGHT, . Committee. 



PROCEEDINGS. 



Severn Baptist Church, Northampton Co., N. C, 

October 28, 1913. 

The thirty-first annual session of the West Chowan Baptist Association 
met this day with the Severn Baptist church. The introductory sermon 
was preached by D. P. Harris, from Acts 17:26, 27. 

The Moderator, T. Gillam, called the Association to order, and the roll of 
churches was called, and the messengers enrolled as follows: 

LIST OF MESSENGERS. 

Ahoskie — ^^C. C. Hoggard, W. H. Miller, Robert Holloman. 

Aulander — *W. H. Mitchell, *M. E. Rice, *W. S. Dunning. 

Ashley's Grove — J. K. Revelle, G. N. Martin, *Cephas Futrell. 

Askewville— W. G. White, A. G. Mizelle. 

Bethlehem — R. P. Thomas, W. A. Perry. 

Bethany— E. E. Daniel, *H. S. Perry, *H. M. Outlaw. 

Brantley's Grove — W. P. Willoughby, S. C. Godwin. 

Buckhorn — L. F. Lee, S. P. Winborne, H. McD. Spiers. 

Capehart's— J. T. White, *W. L. Baker, H. J. Ward. 

Cashie— J. T. Cale, *J. H. Mathews, *H. P. Sewell, *W. S. Pritchard. 

Center Grove — J. D. Jenkins, *T. W. Holloman. 

Chowan — J. C. Scarborough, J. E. Vann. 

Christian Harbor — J. H. Evans, F. P. Britt, J. H. Myers. 

Coleraine— *E. D. Collis, E". White, -C. R. Brinkley. 

Connaritsa — Jesse Hoggard, Josiah Barley, J. S. Jenkins. 

Conway — A. Lassiter, J. R. Martin. 

Creeksville — Nezzie Davis, *J. T. Lanier. 

Elam — *P. B. Stephenson, *C. L. Stephenson, *H. S. Stephenson. 
Galatia— *W. J. Blythe, Lee E. Davis, *D. W. Taylor, *A. S. Garris. 
Green's X Roads— G. W. Castellow, M. W. White. 
Harrellsville— J. T. Wiliams, W. E. Miller. 
Hebron— *H. T. Vann, J. L. Futrell, J. T. Bagget. 
Hillside- 
Holly Grove— *P. A. Harman, *S. C. Askew. 
Holly Springs — J. V. Perry, W. D. McGlaughan. 
Jackson — R. W. Fleetwood, P. M. Fleetwood. 
Kelford— *W. C. Evans, C. L. L. Cobb, *Paul Tyler. 
Lasker — F. W. Bridgers, B. A. Draper. 
Lawrence's— J. M. Britt, *J. K. Phelps, *W. M. White. 
Lewiston— *Wayland Mitchell, *B. F. Parker, T. S. Lassiter. 
Margarettsville — J. S. Gay, Jordan Edwards. 

Mars Hill— *L. P. Freeman, *J. M. Phelps, *G. H. Powell, R. F. Lowe. 

Meherrin— *J. T. Britt, *L. B. Jenkins, B. F. Leverman, *J. J. Parker. 

Mount Carmel — J. L. Pruden, T. J. Stephenson, J. T. Pruden. 

Mount Tabor— *G. B. Story, *M. D. Catling, O. S. Mathews. 

Murfreesboro — W. Watson, R. Sewell. 

Menola— *C. S. Edwards, J. T. Chitty, C. Vinson. 

Merry Hill— *Raleigh Phelps, *T. E. White, *J. T. Keeter. 

Oak Grove— * J. B. Lassiter, *Thomas Hurdle. 

Pine Forest— J. H. Waller. 

Potecasi— A. E. Peele, C. W. Blow, *R. H. Parker. 

Pleasant Grove— M. A. Hughes, *W. L. Rawls, *Walter M. Joyner. 

Powellsville— M. L. Rayner, T. F. Wiggins. 

Republican— W. F. Early, *E. E'. Ward, *Sam Parker, S. C. Garris. 



8 



Minutes of the 



Rich Square— * J. N. Futrell, W. J. Lassiter, *J. P. Lassiter, *J. E. Copeland. 
Roanoke — *J. H. Braswell, J. L. Newsome. 
Roquist — *M. B. Evans, *A. L. Pritchard. 

Robert's Chapel — W. J. Beale, J. T, Woodard, D. N. Stephenson. 

Ross's — J. H. Lawrence, A. F. Castellow, S. V. Cowan, L. S. Mizelle. 

Riverside— C. C. Holder, W. Williams. 

Sandy Run— J. H. Peele, *C. C. Tyler, *J. M. Jacobs. 

Seaboard — J. G. Joyner, J. T. Long, J. R. Crocker. 

Siloam— G. D. Leggett, C. B. Speller. 

Severn — M. M. Long, J. J. White. 

St. Johns— *L. T. Edwards, E. W. Baggett. 

Union — J. A. Copeland, J. R. Horton. 

Winton— J. S. Mitchell, T. L. Lassiter. 

Woodland — A. J. Vaughan, W. J. Whitley, *A. J. Liverman. 

* Absent. 

On motion, the report on credentials was discontinued, it being no further 
needed. 

W. B. Waff, pastor of the Severn church, extended a cordial welcome to 
the messengers and visitors. 

The Association adjourned for dinner, with the benediction by C. W. 
Scarborough. 



AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The Association re-convened at about two o'clock, and was led in prayer 
by J. F. Cale. 

The time having arrived for the election of officers, the following were 
elected for the ensuing year: T. Gillam, Moderator; J. S. Mitchell, Vice- 
Moderator; N. W. Britton, Clerk; R, P. Thomas, Treasurer; R. B. Line- 
berry, Historian. 

The Constitution and Rules of Order were read by C. W. Scarborough. 

Visitors were recognized and welcomed to seats as follows: J. S. Farmer, 
E. L. Middleton, Livingston Johnson, F. B. Hamrick, W. N. Johnson, W. R. 
Cullom and J. H. Poteat. 

M. P. Davis, R. B. Lineberry, E. F. Sullivan and Waller have recently 

taken work as pastors in this Association. 

The Finance Committee were John B. Vann, Estus White and D. N. 
Stephenson. 

J. F. Cale called attention to the fact that the churches should contribute 
more for the minute fund in order that the churches may get more minutes, 
and that the Clerk may have better remuneration for his services. . The 
work of preparing and having the minutes printed is costing more each year. 

After proper investigation by a committee consisting of T. T. Speight, 
J. C. Scarborough and Q. C. Davis, Askewville and Riverside churches were 
received into the Association. The messengers from these churches came 
forward and received the right hand of fellowship by the Moderator. 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



9 



C. W. Scarborough made the report on Sunday Schools. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

Your Committee understands that it is to report on Sunday School con- 
ditions in West Chowan Association. 

Facts. 

The number enrolled in the Sunday Schools in North Carolina is 64 per 
cent of church membership; for the Baptist of North Carolina it is 75 per cent. 
For the Baptists of the West Chowan Association it is 50 per cent. This 
means we are 14 per cent behind the general average for the State, and 25 
per cent behind our own people in the State. Our average attendance is 
still w^orse: Out of 11,962 church members we reported 5,991 enrolled in 
Sunday schools; we also reported 3,414 as our average attendance. This is 
as reported for 1912. This means that if every one enrolled in our Sunday 
Schools is a church member only 28 1-2 per cent regularly attend Sunday 
School. There are nine churches in our Association reporting 18 Sunday 
Schools with an enrollment of 1220, and an average attendance of 390. These 
nine churches report a membership of 2728. That means that 14 1-2 per 
cent of this 2728 church members regularly attend Sunday School. 

In fifteen years we have gained in church membership 2676, in the same 
period we have gained 1712 in Sunday School enrollment. The last five years 
gave us more than half that gain, though last year we gained only five. 
Astonishing, humiliating facts; shall we allow them to be stimulating as well? 

Your committee would ask with emphasis: Have reasonable efforts been 
made by those who lead to change this humiliating record? 

Encouragements: 

Our Sunday Schools are better housed and equipped. Many of our churches 
have separate rooms for the smaller children. Some have separate rooms 
for organized classes, and others are either building such rooms, or preparing 
to do so. Our Teachers have better helps, and by reason of better educational 
advantages are better able to use wisely the helps at hand. Teachers meet- 
ings for the study of the lesson, and methods of teaching, are in evidence in 
number of our churches. Our pastors are more vitally connected with our 
Sunday Schools than formerly. Roads are better, our people have more and 
better conveyances, our church houses are more comfortable. God's blessings 
are and have been upon our work, and everything is more hopeful except 
the inexcusable difference between the numbers we have and what we ought 
to have in our Sunday Schools. 

Recommendations: 

1. A vigorous campaign to enlist more of our church members and out- 
siders for the Sunday schools. 

2. The organization of Teachers Training Classes, in some form, with the 
pastor a member of the class, when practicable. 

3. Collections for 'Sunday School Missions, as for other objects of the 
Convention. 

4. More emphasis on evangelism, in purpose and teaching. 

5. Persistent and intelligent effort to indoctrinate our people. 

6. The use of up-to-date literature on the various phases of up-to-date Sun- 
day School work. Such literature is furnished free by E. L. Middleton, 
Raleigh, N. C. C. W. SCARBOROUGH, for Committee. 

E. L. Middleton spoke on the report, and then it was adopted. 
At this point, the committee on hospitality assigned homes to messengers 
nd visitors. 



10 



Minutes of the 



The Association adjourned to meet again in the evening at 7:30 o'clock. 
The benediction was pronounced by T. T. Speight. 



EVENING SESSION. 

The Association met and devotional exercises were conducted by Living- 
ston Johnson. 

J. C. Scarborough presented the 'report on the Baptist Orphanage. 
REPORT ON THOMASVILLE BAPTIST ORPHANAGE. 

The first orphan child was received into the Orphanage November 11th, 
1885. Since that time 1420 children have been enrolled, and the present 
number is 411. Average cost per child about $100 per year. 

From the best information at hand there are about 1800 children now 
cared for in the various Orphanages of the state. This number constitutes 
about 3-10 of our destitute orphan children and from this estimate near 
6,000 orphan children are practically uncared for in North Carolina. This 
constitutes a mighty appeal from all our people for larger help. 

We are pleased to know that several valuable gifts have been recently 
made to the Orphanage. But these will be used for enlargement and perma- 
nent improvements, and will in time mean a larger current fund from all 
our churches and Sunday Schools. These gifts simply mean a challenge for 
us to do our part in caring for more of our needy children. 

Bequests are usually put in some permanent memorial to the giver and 
are never used to buy meat and bread for the children. That part of the 
work has always devolved on our churches and Sunday Schools, and please 
God it may always be so. 

At the Kennedy Memorial Home which is located in Lenoir County, two 
dormitories are in process of erection. So soon as these are completed the 
authorities of the Orphanage will transfer some of the larger boys and girls. 
This will give room for 75 or 100 more children at Thomasville. 

We, your committee, again recommend: 

(1) That every Sunday School give one Sunday's collection in each month 
to the Orphanage, and that they make the collection as liberal as possible. 

(2) That each Church observe Thanksgiving day, and with a liberal offer- 
ing give the extra share as we enter upon the winter months. 

(3) That our Sunday Schools take Charity and Children in clubs, and that 
individuals subscribe to it when they cannot get it in Sunday School. 

(4) To keep up with our growing numbers we would further recommend 
that we increase our contributions at least 10 per cent for the coming year. 

''Save a man and you save a soul; save a child and you save a multitude." 

Respectfully submitted, JOHN C. SCARBOROUGH, 

Chairman of Committee. 

J. C. Scarborough and F. B. Hamrick addressed the Association, after which 
the report was adopted. 

W. N. Johnson, pastor of the Wake Forest church, was introduced and 
spoke on the importance of building suitable church houses at educational 
centers. He especially presented the matter of funds needed to complete 
the Wake Forest church. C. W. Scarborough, R. P. Thomas and J. H. Math- 
ews were a committee appointed to apportion among the churches of this 
Association the $1500 which had been assumed by this Association for the 
Wake Forest church. 

On motion, the Association adjourned, with prayer by Q. C. Davi«. 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



11 



WEDNESDAY MORNING SESSION. 

The devotional exercises were conducted by C. L. Dowell. 

DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS. 
Received. 

By Baptism 543 

By Letter , • 349 

By Restoration 59 — 951 

Loss. 

By Letter 420 

By Exclusion 104 

By Death 139— 663 

Gain 288 

Total membership 12289 

Expenses for Home Purposes. 

Pastors' salaries $15552.00 

Building and repairs 7428.44 

Poor 712.14 

Incidentals 2123.56 

Sunday School expenses 1347.04 

Minute Fund ? 115.00 

Other objects , 969.25—$ 28234.43 

Contributions for Missions. 

Associational Missions $ 

State Missions 2939.43 

Home Missions 2166.28' 

Foreign Missions 2788.94 

Sunday School Missions 216.66 

, Orphanage 3958.09 

Ministerial Education 585.02 

Ministers' Relief 256.69 

Colleges and Schools 307.70 

Other Objects 1049.43—$ 14268.24 

Grand total $ 42502.67 

Number Churches Contributing to the Different Objects: 

State Missions 58 

Home Missions 57 

Foreign Missions 57 

Sunday School Missions 14 

Orphanage 51 

Ministerial Education 52 

Ministerial Relief ' 42 

Sunday Schools. 

Ij Number Schools reported 63 

Number of Baptisms from the Schools 371 

Number of Church members in the Schools 2763 



12 Minutes of the 

Total number in the Schools 6199 

Number in Schools not Church members 3436 

Contributions through schools $ 4558.33 

Women's Missionary Societies. 

Number Societies 42 

Number members 1314 

Contributions .$ 2412.14 

Young Women's Auxiliaries. 

Number Auxiliaries 4 

Number members 35 

Contributions $ 8.87 

Royal Ambassadors. 

Number Societies 2 

Number members 20 

Contributions $ 7.90 

Sunbeams. 

Number Societies 21 

Number members 582 

Contributions $ 271.75 



The report was adopted. 

R. P. Thomas read the report on Chowan dollege. 

REPORT ON CHOWAN COLLEGE. 

God in His providence gave our forefathers wisdom to see and to realize, 
that if they were to secure and hold Eastern North Carolina for the Baptist 
denomination, they must arrange for the mental and spiritual training of 
those who were to be the leaders of our homes, our churches and our State; 
and realizing that fact, they organized Chowan Baptist Female Institute, 
now Chowan College, about sixty-five years ago; and from that time until 
the present, it has been one of the most powerful influences in building up* 
and refining Christian womanhood in the north-eastern section of our State. 

As State schools are sustained by taxing all classes and denominations 
of people, the State can not legitimately make provision for and teach spirit- 
ual culture, hence only physical and mental training comes properly in the 
sphere of State service. Therefore we must look to the Christian or Denom- 
inational schools for the highest and most complete- education of our chil- 
dren, and it logically follows that Christian schools and Colleges become an 
imperative necessity. The work of Christian education can best be done 
by Christian schools directed in policy and instruction by Christian men and 
women. 

We have in Chowan College such an institution. There the physical, in- 
tellectual and spiritual powers can be and are all taught and trained. It is 
our College, and we should be proud of it and patronize it. 

Our energetic and resourceful President, Dr. J. D. Brewer, informs me 
that the sixty-fifth session of Chowan College was the greatest in the history 
of the institution. During that session the College enrolled one hundred 
and fifty students, eight more than the highest previous enrollment. The 
present session, the sixty-sixth, has opened with ten more boarders than last 
year. A new dormitory, costing twenty-six hundred dollars, has been built. 
It accommodates sixteen students and is full. There is room in the entire 
college for only three more boarders. 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



13 



The curriculum has been further enlarged by the addition of Greek, Italian, 
a second year course in the Bible, and a new department of Domestic Science. 
The faculty now consists of fifteen members, all trained for their special 
departments of instruction. 

The needs of the College are many and urgent. Electric lights and a dormi- 
tory will be needed before the money can be raised to supply them. The 
most pressing need, however, is an adequate endowment fund. The interest 
on a sufiicient endowment fund would keep up the equipment. Other insti- 
tutions of the State have either endowments or large appropriations from 
State funds. 

Let us be true to our College and equip it for a career of increasing useful- 
ness. Its prestige and power have been great in the past. Let us make it 
greater in the future. R. P. THOMAS, for Committee. 

J. D. Brewer and T. D. Speight spoke to this report, and it was adopted. 
At this point, a class of girls from Chowan College was invited to sing, 
which singing was done very effectively. 

The report on Foreign Missions was read by Q. C. Davis. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

Christianity is God's plan for saving a lost world through Jesus Christ. 
That Christianity was intended to be the universal religion is evident from 
the facts: 

1. That Prophetic statements in the Old Testament expressly declare 
such to be the purpose of God, "I shall give thee the heathen for thine in- 
heritance, and the uttermost part of the earth for thy possession," "All 
kings shall fall down before Him; all nations shall serve Him." "All Nations 
shall call Him blessed." "Let the whole earth be filled with His glory." 

2. That our Lord gave commandment to His disciples to prosecute a world- 
wide and age-long evangelism. "Go ye into all the world, and preach the 
gospel to every creature." "Lo! I am with you always even unto the end 
of the age." "Ye shall be my witnesses in Jerusalem, and in all Judea, and 
in Samaria, and unto the uttermost part of the earth." 

The missionary enterprise is God's method of accomplishing this great 
purpose through the co-operative labors of His people. When the Holy 
Ghost said to the church in Antioch, "Separate me Barnabas and Saul to 
the work to which I have called them"; and the brethren had laid their 
hands on them and sent them away; then New Testament Foreign Missions 
had been authoritatively inaugurated; and Christianity began her world 
conquest. 

The greatest movement among men the world has ever known is the For- 
eign Missionary movement. No other cause, or propaganda, has half so 
profoundly effected the whole course of human history since its advent as 
has Christian Missions. The great work has progressed from century to 
century, and from country to country until at last the Messengers of the 
Cross are pleading the cause of Christ in every land, and in the Isles of 
the Sea. 

In this great work Southern Baptists have no little part. The first Baptist 
Missionary Society in the South was organized in Richmond, Va., just one 
hundred years ago yesterday (October 28, 1813). What a marvelous century 
of Missionary achievement it has been. For nearly one-third of this hun- 
dred years Southern Baptists co-operated with the old Triennial Convention. 
For a little more than two-thirds the Southern Baptist Convention has been 
in existence, and has prosecuted the work with vigor, and ever increasing 
success. Beginning in 1845 with one Foreign Mission field, namely, China, 
it has enlarged its work until now the Convention has missions in China, 
Africa, Italy, Brazil, Mexico, Japan, and Argentina. 

Great opportunities are before us just now. China is a republic for the 



14 



Minutes of the 



first time in all her history; and not since the 13th century when Kublai 
Khan begged for a hundred missionaries to evangelize his empire, have con- 
ditions been so favorable for the propagation of the Christian faith. But 
Kublai begged in vain, and the opportunity was lost. If we fail to make 
the most of the present opportunity in China, it may be another five or six 
hundred years before God gives another like it. 

Especially successful is our work in South America. The work was begun 
in 1882 — thirty-one years ago. Then we had nothing there. Now we have 
175 churches with 11,000 members in Brazil; 13 churches with 578 members 
in Argentina; and 800 converts in South Chile. It seems to your committee 
that South America is the most inviting field in the world for Foreign mis- 
sionary work by Southern Baptists. The opening of the Panama Canal 
will bring us in closer touch with Chile, and other countries on the West 
coast. 

War in Mexico has greatly crippled our work there. But a new day 
will dawn in Mexico very soon; and new and better conditions will, surely 
arise. Let us be ready to seize the better opportunity when it comes. 

North Carolina's apportionment for Foreign Missions for the present year 
is $52,500. More than one-third of the Conventional year had passed on 
September 15th, and North Carolina had contributed but $6,978.67, or but 
little more than one-eighth of the amount apportioned. Other States have 
not averaged any better. Thus the Board has a burden of debt to carry, 
as well as interest on borrowed money. 

Your committee would make the following recommendations: 

1. We would repeat the plea, so often made, that our churches strive to 
make their offerings to missions earlier in the year. At least to make a part 
of their offerings at the beginning of the Conventional year; and thus lessen 
the burdens of the Board. 

2. That an effort be made in our churches to induce the members to sub- 
scribe for the Foreign Mission Journal, and to read it. It will arouse and 
stimulate an intelligent interest in the work. 

3. That we lay emphasis on the value of our Women's Missionary Socie- 
ties; for their members are educating the other members of our churches in 
Missions. 

4. That we press the work of Mission Study Classes. We believe they are 
capable of advancing the cause of Missions more than any other means just 
now before us. 

5. That our churches try the "Every-member Canvass" in their efforts 
to raise and increase missionary offerings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Q. C. DAVIS, 

T. T. SPEIGHT, Committee. 

This report was discussed by Q. C. Davis and was adopted. 

The regular order was here suspended, and C. L. Dowell presented the 
matter of establishing a Baptist hospital at Ahoskie. 

On motion, it was agreed to discuss the matter more fully to-night in a 
mass meeting for that purpose. 

J. F. Cale submitted the report on State Missions. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

Christian missions is of Divine appointment. The injunction of Jesus, 
"Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature," lays 
upon His followers, as an imperative duty, the task of world-missions. 

However, the word of Jesus, "Beginning from Jerusalem," teaches us that 
in the divine order, State Missions claim a blessed priority. For eighty-two 
years the Baptists of North Carolina have been prosecuting the work of State 



West Choiuan Baptist Association. 



15 



Missions. During these years much has been accomplished in soul-winning, 
church building and church development, yet the field is still white unto 
harvest. 

For convenience, and because conditions differ, we speak of Eastern, Cen- 
tral and Western North Carolina. 

In Eastern North Carolina there are eighteen counties in which there is 
great destitution. Here is to be found real mission work. Our watch word 
in this section is "Evangelism." 

Very different conditions obtain in Central or Piedmont North Carolina. 
This section of our State is feeling the impetus of industrialism. Mighty 
changes are already taking place, yet we are only at the beginning of 
change. The Southern Power Company in a few years will completely 
revolutionize Piedmont North Carolina. Here the Christian motive must 
be put into money-making, industry must be christianized, the stamp of the 
spiritual must be put upon things material. 

In Western North Carolina we have about 500 churches, with 40,500 mem- 
bers. Here development is our task. This great host, if properly taught, 
will become a mighty power for good. 

Last year we raised for State Missions $47,931.91. We had 150 missionaries, 
who preached at 335 churches and out-stations. They held 231 meetings, 
from which 1,607 people were baptized. They reported 2,627 professions 
of faith, 20 houses of worship being built, and 12 houses finished. 

Our work this year is upon a basis of $50,000. Of this amount Eastern 
North Carolina gets $20,210; Piedmont or Central North Carolina, $19,528; 
and Western North Carolina, $7,970. With these insufficient amounts we 
can never accomplish the tasks that confront us in these sections of our State. 

But we must not only give the gospel to North Carolina, the field is the 
world. We must not suppose for a moment that the whole purpose of State 
Missions is to build up the cause in our State. We must save North Caro- 
lina, but North Carolina may help save the world. State Missions means the 
mission task in North Carolina, and North Carolina in the task of world- 
missions. 

With the grandeur of opportunity and the peril of delay to urge us for- 
ward, we recommend: 

(1) That our pastors make strong and urgent and repeated appeals to the 
churches to increase their offerings to State Missions. 

(2) That in raising State Mission funds, we make an every member can- 
vass; 

(3) That our churches make their offerings to State Missions earlier in 
the Associational year. Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN F. CALE, 
H. J. WARD, Committee. 

Livingston Johnson addressed the Association on this subject, and the 
report was adopted. 

Adjourned for dinner, with prayer by D. P. Harris. 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION. 

Re-assembled at two o'clock, and prayer was offered by D. Cale. 
W. B. Waff read the report on Ministerial Education. 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL EDUCATION. 

Our people are more and more waking up and going forward along educa- 
tional lines, and good schools are increasing as the years go by. The ones 
we now have are filled up with boys and girls preparing themselves for life's 
duties and responsibilities. 

We note with pleasure that our Legislature has declared for a six months 



16 



Minutes of the 



term for our public schools and has submitted to the people an amendment 
to the Constitution to this end. This, together with the compulsory educa- 
tional law, is a long step forward in behalf of the boys and girls of this gen- 
eration. But the effort seems to grow continually stronger to divorce Chris- 
tianity from all of the State schools, which emphasizes the great importance 
of our denominational schools in which the rising generation may receive 
Christian education, the only kind that is complete. 

The education of our young men who feel called of God to preach the 
gospel is of paramount importance. If our churches are to attain the high 
standard of efficiency in Christian service that God would have them attain, 
we must have a well trained ministry to lead them. Our Board at Wake 
Forest is now aiding 65 young men, while there are eleven other ministerial 
students there who are not aided by the Board. 

The work of aiding our North Carolina men at the Seminary at Louisville 
after this Conventional year is to be combined with the work of the Board 
at Wake Forest. It is estimated that about $7,000.00 a year will be required 
for the combined work. 

We recommend that our Association raise its proportional part of this 
amount. We also recommend that our Sunday Schools be requested to take 
one special collection a year for this work. Respectfully submitted, 

W. B. WAFF, 
T. O. JOYNER, Committee. 

This report was discussed by W. R. Cullom and was adopted. 
J. H. Evans presented the report on Home Missions. 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

The founders of our republic desired that this should be a Christian nation. 
They set forth their ideas in many of their earliest state papers. They re- 
fused to bolster up religious institutions by state patronage. 

History has justified their wisdom. The oppressed of every nation to-day 
look to America to show the way to better things. We have tried and know 
of a truth that righteousness exalteth a nation. But our best efforts have 
been imperfect. We also know that sin is a reproach to a nation. Of 94,- 
000,000 people in the United States, only about 22,000,000 are members of 
any evangelical religious body. Of the 31,000,000 in the Southern Baptist 
Convention territory, fewer than 11,000,000 are members of evangelical 
bodies. There remains a large task of pioneer mission work in our terri- 
tory. After all the successful efforts of Home and State Missions, scores of 
people in many of our states do not even hear the gospel message. 

There has come about, in addition, a pioneer work of a new kind. It is 
to be found in the slums of the cities and sometimes along the fashionable 
boulevards. With the old tasks unfinished, many new ones are being added 
that are more difficult. 

Southern Baptists are confronted with an immense vitalization task. Thou- 
sands of churches without resident pastors, with only once a month preaching 
are finding themselves inadequately taught and trained to meet the pressing 
needs of to-day. "Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have 
commanded you," we are beginning to see, is as truly a part of our work as 
the first part of the great commission, and the Home Mission Board is under- 
taking to help in this great work for the enlistment and strengthening of 
our undeveloped churches. To strengthen our board in this work, is to 
strengthen everything for which Baptists stand. 

Three thousands unhoused churches in our convention territory with thou- 
sands of others in buildings that are not adequate to their needs, mutely 
appeal for a large and hearty support. To meet this great need, the Home 
Board is raising the million dollars Church Building and Loan Fund. 

In the Southwest, in Cuba and Panama, among the Southern mountains, 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 17 

in destitute city places and needy rural districts throughout the south among 
the Indians and Negroes and foreigners; through evan|elism, chu?ch buTding 
work, and enlistment endeavors our Home Mission Board is to^ay doini 
the greatest work of all its fruitful history. ^ ^ 

With all these tasks pressing for vigorous, capable attention, our board 
stands in the forefront ranks of those agencies of our Baptist body through 
which we seek to keep inviolate in a day of teaching of His word There 
s danger that new and increasing Southern wealth shall lead men to drown 
the voice of spiritual appeal in the noise of the market-place. There is a 
danger now that the world has become a single community, that we shall love 
humanity m the abstract and forget to love our neighbors in their own 
persons-those who live with us and are the incapable test of the realUy 
of our love for men. There is danger that hasty effort on the part of some 
of our churches to adjust themselves to new and involved social serviceTe 
quirements may betray us into a wrong emphasis. There is danglr that 
the quality of our impact upon society may be impaired by co?fufhig the 
goodly pearls of social efficiency and human fraternity with the pearl of 
great price. Christianity means better living conditions among men but 

-^^-^ ^^-^ ^^tter co^nditloAs^^ 
uZTn.Mn,l^^^^^^^ ^^"-^ '^'^ to carry out its 

thefr^Ifte'oneVMrT''"' ^"""^^"^ ""^^^^ "^^^^^"^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ 

2nd. That pastors and workers urge our church members to subscribe 

for the Home Field, the monthly Home Mission magazine; and to make 7hl 

isking- ' ' """^^ tracts which are free ?or the 

3rd. That our churches remember Home Missions during the year and sivP 
Ith'^^r/'^^^^'^^^ '° "'""t the constant needs of the Lard ^'^^ 
4th That earnest prayer be made for the cause of Home Missions in all 

the.churches and that our pastors be requested to preac\ 0^^^ great 

Atln^t.^'^rr'' ^"""^^ ^^''^^^ ^« ^^''^ National Bank Building, 

Atlanta, Ga. Fraternally submitted, 

J. H. EVANS, 

E. WHITE, Committee. 

This report was spoken to by R. B. Lineberry, C. W. Scarborough D P 
Harris, and was adopted. ' ' * 

J. S. Jenkins, J. H. Evans, and W. E. Miller, the committee on Time Place 
and Preacher for the next session of this body reported as f ollows • ' Time 
Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October, 1914; Place, Harrellsville- to 
preach the introductory sermon, W. B. Waff; alternate, L. E Dailey ' 

Adjourned with prayer by C. W. Scarborough. 



WEDNESDAY EVENING SESSION. 

h ^^^.^T'''^^''''' assembled at 7:30 o'clock, with John E. Vann presiding 
prlye^ ^""^ ^^^^-^o^erator being absent. T. S. Crutchfield led in 

Q. C. Davis addressed the meeting on Christian Education. After the 
address the matter of establishing a Baptist hospital within the bounds of 



jg Minutes of the 

this Association was discussed at length, and finally on a rising vote, the 
Association expressed its approTal of the proposition, by adopting the recom- 
mendation below, but did not commit itself as a body to any financial 
support. 

RESOLUTION ON HOSPITAL. 
WhPreas we the West Chowan Association, do realize the great need of 
^iX^ redicll attenti^ and all other needful help and relief to those who 
Sly L so unfortunate as to be afflicted with any bodily suffering or disease, 
Tnd whe?eas we are led to believe that our Lord calls upon us as individ- 
uals Jnd as organized Christian bodies, to minister to the sick and suffering 

° Whereas^'wetlieve it will serve to further tl^e kingdom of God even in our 
own Association and denomination; therefore, be it Resolved 

Firft S we the West Chowan Association assembled in our 31st annual 
sersLn do heTe and now pledge ourselves to give our moral support to the 
fmT?.Pdiate establishment of a hospital for the above mentioned purposes 
TecS That^^^^^^ messengers from the churches of this Association 
wiil encourage our respective churches in any moral or financial support 
wh ch they al o?ganized bodies or as individuals in such churches may feel 
of Jheir own accord and free will, disposed to offer to the establishment and 

^'S^Th1tThtho"s« located in the town of Ahoskie, N. C. 

Fourth, ^hat tlis hospital shall be known as the West Chowan Baptist 
liospital. Respectfully submitted, 13. J:^. HAKKito. 

Adjourned, with prayer by D. Cale. 

THURSDAY MORNING. 

The Association convened at 10 o'clock with J. S. Mitchell, Vice-Moderator, 

'""r^V L^neberry was elected a member of the State Mission Board, and 
C L Dowell was elected Vice-President of the Foreign Mission Board for 
this Association, and D. P. Harris was elected Vice-President of the Home 

Mission ^.^^^^-^^^ ^ ^ Sullivan and D. P. Harris were appointed delegates 
to the Baptist State Convention, and C. L. Dowell a delegate to the Southern 
Baptist Convention. 

REPORT OF TREASURER. 
R. P. Thomas, Treasurer, in account with the West Chowan Association, 
October 31st, 1912. 

To amount from Finance Committee for Minute Fund ^ ^^t'g? 

Dec 12, 1912, To amount from J. S. Mitchell, Treasurer 

$ 106.76 

Credit. 

Dec. 23rd, 1912, by amount paid N. W. Britton, Clerk $ 30.00 

Jan. 6th, 1913, by amount paid Nash Brothers ^^'"^ 

$ 100.00 1 

, ^ , $ 6.76 

To balance due Minute fund |y 

Respectfully submitted, R. P. THOMAS, Treasurer, 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



19 



This report was adopted. 

John E. Vann, chairman of the Finance Committee, reported $111.85 col- 
lected for the Minute fund. 

REPORT OF HISTORIAN. 

It is pleasant to record that the aggregate amount contributed to mis- 
sions — State, Home and Foreign is larger than any previous year in the 
history of the Association. 

The baptisms reported by the churches this year are almost twice as 
many as were reported last year. The number being 516 for this year as 
against 284 for last year. 

Nothing represents better the increasing interests in the gospel of Christ 
than the increasing amount contributed to the support of the gospel. Such 
increase indicates substantial progress in general church life. It is gratifying 
to note that a large number of our churches have increased their pastors' 
salaries during the year. 

Buildings. 

The new organization at Askewville has built a new church house under 
the leadership of Rev. H. F. Brinson. 

The church at Coleraine, under the pastoral care of Rev. R. B. Lineberry, 
has bought a pastor's home. Under the leadership of Rev. C. W. Scarborough 
Mount Tabor has just completed two commodious rooms for Baraca and Phi- 
lathea classes. 

Holly Springs dedicated her house of worship free of debt on September 
14th of this year. 

Pastoral Changes. 

Rev. R. B. Lineberry comes from Sandy Creek Association to be pastor 
at Colerain, Ross, and Christian Harbor. 
I Rev. D. P. Harris was called from the Chowan and Union churches to be 
I pastor at Windsor. 

1 Rev. E. F. Sullivan became pastor of Meherrin, Menola and Hebron. 
Rev. M. P. Davis becomes pastor at Aulander and Connaritsa. 

Chowan College. 

I A new college dormitory has been built at a cost of $2600.00, and a new 
Ij department of Domestic Science has been added, and the enrollment is the 
largest in the history of the College. 

Necrology. 

Margarettsville has lost in deacon D. E. Bridgers a faithful worker in 
church and Sunday school, 
i Deacon Ashley Liverman, sixty years a member of the church, and fifty 

I years a deacon, has passed to his reward. He was a member of Ashley's 

II Grove church at the time of his death. For more than a half century he 
1 exerted a strong and brbad Christian influence. 

|| Galatia has lost her last charter member in Sister Rebecca Hasty who lived 
to the ripe age of ninety years. Three other members of this church have 

I also died — Brother Eddie Mark Howell, Sister Susie Story and Sister Dora 
V. Taylor. 

Lasker church lost a worthy member in the death of Sister Martha J. 
Lassiter, the wife of deacon Luther Lassiter. 

Roanoke feels her loss in the death of Brother Ellis Warren. 

Cashie church, Windsor, lost in the death of Miss Carrie Pierce a most 
loyal and devout Christian woman. 

Ahoskie has lost in the death of Thomas Henry Overton, one of her most 



20 



Minutes of the 



pious, useful and honored members and deacons. "He was a man full of 
faith and of the holy Ghost." 

Bethlehem has lost her senior deacon, James Jacob Hoggard, a man whose 
pure life and blameless walk and long service were a benediction for 50 
years. He was 78 years old. Sister Martha Thomas Britton was for seventy 
years an honored member of Bethlehem church, the widow of Rev. Wm. 
P. Britton, a former pastor, she was the eldest member, and was beloved 
by all for her steady and helpful life and work. She died in her 87th year. 

Capehart has lost by death the following members, viz: Deacon J. N. 
Thomas, George Mizelle, W. W. Baker and L. E. Thomas. 

Greens X Roads has sustained the loss of one of her charter members in 
the death of deacon Z. W. White. 

The Rev. J. A. Speight, D.D., for a third of a century a minister in this 
Association passed from his earthly labors to his heavenly reward August 
31st, 1913. 

Below is appended an obituary and an appreciation by Judge Francis D. 
Winston, of Windsor, N. C, a long time friend of Dr. Speight: 

John Alexander Speight, Doctor of Divinity. 

The wire announcing the death of John Alexander Speight, D.D., brought 
sorrowful grief to the hearts of thousands in Bertie County who knew and 
loved him. 

He passed into his more perfect day and brighter light from the hospital, 
whither he had gone for temporary ease from bodily pain. No hope of adding 
a day to his long span of year carried him there. He traveled beyond the 
bounds of man's journey. He was there listening for the Master's Voice. The 
call was clear. The answer was steady. 

John Alexander Speight was born in Gates County, North Carolina, May 
25, 1840. He came of sturdy and respectable stock. Henry Speight and Olivia 
Pruden were his parents. They were a godly and a frugal couple. The 
environment of his birth colored his life. That home gave two useful preach- 
ers to the cause of Christ. He had small chance for preparation for college. 
It was mainly a few months of free school here and there. He was educated 
at Columbian College in Washington, D. C. He was a scholarly preacher. 
His diction evidenced the class room and the study. 

He celebrated his twenty-first birth-day in an army camp in Virginia. He 
was a Confederate soldier in May, 1861. He fought bravely in battle and 
endured want and privation without murmur. He was at Point Lookout for 
eighteen months as a prisoner of war. His military record was made as a 
member of Company B, "Gates Guards" of the Fifth Regiment of Infantry. 
He came home in 1865, with his parole in his pocket and a sweetheart in his 
eye. He married Miss Elizabeth Williams, of Gates county, in 1865. She 
made his home happy. She bore his sons and daughters. She blessed his 
life. She went before him and was eagerly watching and waiting for his 
coming. They are together now! Blessed thought that they are man and 
wife in glory! 

From the tented field and clash of arms he passed quickly to the Gospel of 
Peace. Within a year of Appomattox he was a minister of the Missionary 
Baptist Church. The call came to him in the silence of his own home. 
He was ordained to preach in Middle Swamp Baptist Church in Gates county. 
It was a simple ceremony, but godly men performed it, and pious men and 
women prayed God's blessing upon it. They were effective prayers. He was 
pastor of many strong Baptist churches in the old Chowan Association. 
Cashie Church, of Windsor, with its century and a third of blessed memories, 
was honored by his pastorate. Ross' with its simple faith and trustful folk 
and genuine hope was blessed by his ministry. He was a man of power in 
the Second Baptist Church, of Petersburg, Va. 

He had other denominational activities. He was at one time associate edi- 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



21 



tor of the Biblical Recorder. He was an agent for Wake Forest College. 
He was the editor of the North Carolina and the Atlantic Baptist. In recog- 
nition of his scholarship, his education, his comprehensive knowledge of the 
Bible, his great and efficient labors for God and for good, Judson College con- 
ferred on him the degree of Doctor of Divinity. It was a degree conferred on 
merit and worn worthily. 

He was in the full fellowship of his church and in the active work of his 
ministry when he passed from earth in St. Vincent's Hospital, Norfolk, Ya., 
August 31, 1913. 

His son, an eminent physician, had carried him there so he might be with 
him hourly. He suffered from an old war wound. His home was at Sunbeam, 
Va. There he lived with a married daughter. There his body was carried to 
the church of which he was pastor. Rev. Vernon I'Anson, D.D., of Grace 
Baptist church, Norfolk, conducted services. A large concourse of admiring 
friends and loving members of his church paid tribute to his memory. They 
wrapped his coffin with bud and flower. His friends J. R. Hart, W. L. Bowles, 
D. M. Beale, C. R. Linguist, J. T. Whitly, L. T. Worrell, C. F. Whitfield and 
J. W. Rittee bore his body to and from the church. His honorary pall-bearers 
were good citizens and Christian men of all faiths: Messrs. Dr. S. J. Railey, 
J. L. Chitty, V. K. Daughtry, C. C. Ferguson, W. L. Beale, L. L. Maddry, 
A. D. Bryant, J. L. Barnes, Dr. W. B. Barham, J. C. Chitty, M. R. Moore and 
J. T. Bryant. 

The body was taken to Berkley, Va., for burial. It rests in Magnolia ceme- 
tery by the side of his loving wife. Rev. Sparks W. Melton, of Freemason 
Street Baptist Church, Norfolk, officiated. Here the attendance was large and 
I the magnificent floral tributes marked the love and esteem in which he was 

• held in his adopted State. His body was borne to the grave by Messrs. W. 
J. Fulford, S. Berkley, Charles Horner and G. D. Williams. 

His late comrades in arms were represented by Captaia J. S. Whitworth 
and James Howard, of Niemeyer-Shaw Camp Confederate Veterans. The 
Sons of the Confederate Veterans who assisted in bearing the old hero were 
Matt Tatem, James F. Tatem and Fletcher Powell. And so he has reached 
the end of an earthly life. His days are beyond time and space. 
I The members of Dr. Speights immediate family are a son. Dr. J. R. Speight, 

iof Norfolk, Va., and two daughters, Mrs. Clara Drake, with whom he lived at 
Sunbeam, Va., and Mrs. Willie Peele, Everetts, N. C. Two brothers Rev. 
Thomas T. Speight, D.D., of Bertie County, and James O. Speight, of near 
Courtland, Va., and two sisters, Mrs. M. O. Edwards, of near Courtland, Va., 
and Mrs. D. E. Riddick, of Gatesville, N. C, survive him. 

I have given only the main incidents of this noble life. I am not writing an 
obituary. I am saying good-bye to my friend of many years as he sets out 
on his travel of the fuller life. I hope to join him, 

I have known Dr, Speight intimately more than a generation. He minis- 
tered in Bertie County to a people who needed his purity and strength. He 
jl gave them freely of both. They are better men and women because he moved 
I in and out among them. I was enriched by his friendship. He honored me 

I with his confidence, to a large extent; more than I merited. To me he still 
lives. With me there are no dead. I turn from the black pall that covered 

• I the coffin to smell the scented flowers that loving hands lay upon the mound. 

I I Hymns of grief bring me no consolation. I yearn for the songs of immortal 
ii triumph. I imbibed much of life's true spirit and philosophy from my friend, 
11 who having gone before yet teaches me and all who would learn. 

( The third of a century taken by him for work in Bertie county were years 
\ I of service, of good purposes, of lasting benefits. Good and ripened fruits, fol- 
1 1 lowed and for years to come will follow his walk and talk, his preaching and 
Iji teaching, his public and private ministrations. The pulpit was not his only 
' sacred desk. He preached at the bed side, by the counter, on the road, wher- 

• ever he found erring humanity. He was of generous hand, yet frugal. He 
' I leaves a goodly store. He was the bravest of men, not in that he was in- 



22 



Minutes of the 



sensible to fear, but in that he mastered fear by courage of spirit. He was 
one of the noblest and truest of men, not in that he did not know temptation, 
but in that he resisted and overcame temptations. 

We are taught that our physical bodies undergo complete physical change 
every few years. The changes in his matured body were therefore many. 
He carried to the grave no atom of the body that came in at his birth. With 
every change he passed to a better temporal tenement where the spirit might 
dwell. 

I shall not enlarge upon his rich and ripe scholarship, his full and flowing 
pen, his ceaseless and efficient labors, his purity of purpose and of life, his 
just convictions. The great fundamental doctrines of the Baptist faith were 
the pillars on which his life rested. He solved all questions, political, busi- 
ness, social, religious, by those standards. 

I shall not unfold his beautiful life around the fireside as husband and 
father. Those of his blood who weep with crushing sorrow are his testimony 
there. 

I cannot forbear to speak of his brotherly affection. Prom that humble 
home in Gates county the Master called to His work two servants. They 
have been towers of strength in His work and for good in all ways. In their 
devotion and love for each other they parallel the lives of those mentioned 
in the Book. I shall not describe his power as a citizen, bold and fearless I 
for good causes, and equally bold and fearless against bad causes. I shall \ 
not portray his gifts as an orator, moving sinful men and women to tears of i 
repentance and to righteous living. I shall not praise his valor as a soldier. { 
A cruel wound that sapped his strength for half a century is a monument 
to his dauntless courage at the cannon's mouth. 

It was his privilege to go to the great reunion of former enemies on the 
bloody field of Gettysburg a month before he died. With these foes he frater- 
nized in fond fellowship. He gave them both hands — warm from his heart. 
Bitterness and hate had no lodgment in his breast. He preached to those who 
had wounded him the blessed peace of righteous living. It was not North, 
nor South, it was upvs^ard. Heaven! They heard him and loved him. y 

If occasion may be, I shall speak of him, not in keeping with his deserving, 
but as prompted by my love. He was my friend and I shall miss him. I 
Many a time I shall long for a touch of his vanished hand and longingly 
listen for a sound of his stilled voice. ] 

Hail my friend and for a time farewell! FRANCIS D. WINSTON. { 

Windsor, N. C. 

Historical Sketch of the Severn Baptist Church. 

The church at Severn was constituted July 19, 1896, in a one-room school 
Louse situated v/here the present magnificent school building now stands. 
There were seventeen charter members. The Presbytery consisted of Elders 
J. N. Hoggard, R. H. Burras and C. W. Scarborough. 

The pastors have been Elders J. N. Hoggard, July, 1896, to February, 1899. 
L. M. Curtis, March, 1899, to January, 1901. D. Cale, February, 1901, to Feb- 
ruary, 1905. Jessie McCarter, April, 1905, to September, 1906. W. B. Waff 
January, 1907, to the present. The year before the present pastor took charge 
the church, including the Sunday school and Woman's Missionary Society 
gave for pastor's salary $150.00. Total for home expenses $369.03. Totai 
for missionaries, &c., $256.84. Total for the year 1906, $625.87. 

For the present year, 1913, the church, including the Sunday school anc 
Woman's Missionary Society, gave for pastor's salary $525.00. Total fo: 
home expenses, $724.82; total for missions, &c., $602.90; total for the yea; 
1913, $1327.72. This is the third year that the church has had preaching tw( 
Sundays in the month. 

The report was adopted. 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



23 



J. C. Scarborough read the report on Ministers' Relief. 

REPORT ON MINISTERS RELIEF BOARD. 

The Ministers Relief Board is located at Durham, N. C, and is composed 
of seven brethren, all living in or near Durham, and some twenty or twenty- 
five associate members located in different parts of our State. These asso- 
ciate members are to keep before the churches the interests of our old 
brethren. 

One third of all income are permanently invested on good security, the in- 
terest only can be used. The other two-thirds are set aside for the relief of 
old ministers and their widows. 

There are some thirty-five ministers or widows receiving aid from this 
Board. The amount received by each ranges from fifty to two hundred 
dollars per year. 

The minutes of our last session show that fifteen of our churches contrib- 
uted nothing to this worthy cause. 

We earnestly request that every church take at least one collection a year 
for these worthy saints who have given their active lives to the cause of 
Christ at a salary that permitted not of investment. Our government retires 
all her soldiers, on a good pension, after thirty years of service. Ought the 
I church of Christ to do less for her leaders and teachers after they have 
i spent their active lives in the cause of Christ? 

1 We further request that ail churches who can take a special Christmas 
offering for this Board. Respectfully, W. E. MILLER, 

For Committee. 

Remarks on this report were made by J. C. Scarborough, and it was adopted. 
■ I It was ordered that the obituary of J. A. Speight written by F. D. Winston 
J and published by the Biblical Recorder be published in the minutes of this 
1, 1 Association. 

I On motion, the churches are asked to consider in their Conference that the 
^1 j Association recommends an increase for this year of ten per cent in benevo- 
lent contributions, and a return to the pledge system after this year. The 
Clerk of the Association is to notify the churches of this recommendation. 

The following resolution was unanimously adopted: Resolved, That we 
tender to the beloved Pastor of Severn Baptist Church and members and 

J friends of said church our sincere thanks for their unbounded hospitality 
so lavishly bestowed upon this session of the West Chowan Association. 

^5 After a most harmonious session, the Association closed with prayer by 
T. S. Crutchfield. T. GILLAM, Moderator. 

1 N. W. BRITTON, Clerk. 

I 

'eDi 

a.a 

etj 
ota 

aDi 
fo 
yea 

ti 



TABLE I 



CHURCHES. 



MCZiK I CO 



^ 



Alioskie 

Aulauder 

Ashley's Grove. . . 

Askewville 

Bethlehem 

Bethany 

Brantley's Grove 

Buckhorn 

Capehart's 

Cashie 

Center Grove.... 

Chowan 

Christian Harbor 

Coleraine 

Connaritsa 

Creeksville 

Conwav 

Elam 

Galatia 

Green's X Roads 
Harrellsville . . . . | 

Hebron I 

Hillside I 

Holly Grove... 
Holly Springs. . 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Lawrence's .... 

Lewiston 

Margarettsville 

Mars Hill 

Meherrin 

Mount Carmel. . 
Mount Tabor . . 
Murf reesboro . . 

Menola 

Merry Hill 

Oak Grove 

Pine Forest. . . . 

Potecasi 

Pleasant Grove 
Powellsville . . . 
Republican .... 
Rich Square... 

Roanoke 

Roquist 

Roberts' Chapel 

Ross's 

Riverside 

Sandy Run 

Seaboard 

Siloam 

Severn 

St. John's 

Union 

Winton 

Woodland 



$ 450 
800 
150 
90 
325 
200 
200 
500 
250 
1000 
175 
40<^ 
905 

500^ 
250 
150 
.300 
200 
325 
200, 
250 
200 
100 
200 , 
75. 
125. 
200, 
1.37 
175. 
2.50 
175. 
225. 
400. 
200. 
500. 
400, 
200. 
175. 
150. 



225. 
2.50. 
225. 
200. 
450. 
150. 



400. 
300. 
1.50. 
2.50. 
200. 
100. 
525. 
150. 
400. 
350. 
400. 



.$1050.00 

95 



445. 
1360. 



100.00 
41.76 



15.00 



488. 



113.11 
26.00 
240.34 



001 
001 



'28.'66| 



50 
00 
00 

00 72 

501 329 
125 



.00 113 
.50 428 

,00| 

.501 3 
,001 50 

,001 

,001 



75.00 
38.00 

m.oo 

.35.26 
20.00 
49.00 
90.00 



3.051 600.00 



335, 
1. 
20. 



3.00 



1500. 
120. 



106 

5 



100.00 



3.00 
32.30 
25.00 
43.82 
25.00 
10., 30 
110.00 
60.. 33 
25.72 
37.00 
35.06 
25.00 
29.18 



7.51 
44.00 
89.76 
67.19 
12.27 
48.35 



35.00 
38.00 
40.00 
20.00 
24.00 



5.00 
73.40 



5.00 
5.00 
64.50 
1.06 
50.00 
48.00 
80.34 



$74.30 



$25.37 
15.00 
5.00 



23.05 



141 
101 



27.30 
15.34 
28.91 
,68i 30.16 
,00| 42.12 
,001 30.00 

981 

,00 

■ 58.80 
25.00 



25.00 
20.80 



24.00 
18.35 



61 f 
96 
00 
00 
45 . 



3.00 
30.39 



.35.681 



29.70 
15.001 



40.35 
10.00 
8.. 35 
12.651 



42.00 



28.42 



44.00 



07 

50 

70 1 10.. 35 

..I 

001 

001 14.22 
131 27.. 50 



36.00 



50 
50 
80 

161 40.30 
141 



25.181 
35.001 
14.001 
18.291 
I 





8.41 


4.00 


6.75 


13.00 






12.50 


18.56 


6.31 


44.88 


7.35 


40.00 


22.64 


6.75 





371 

281 52.55 
201 



9.38 
25.57 



10.001 



35.001 2.00 

10.001 

38.661121.50 



. . .1 23.381 10.00 

.001 60.001 

.211 32.00] 48.00 



$1679 
989 
675 

1467 
.377 
264 
281 
671 
310 

1826 
257 
605 
344 
672 
3.50 
199 
426 
326 
.353 
267 
284 
294 
217 
633 
240 
277 
375 
627 
236 
389, 
251 
292 
522 
238 

1248 
515 
267 
209 
222 
18 
302 
318, 
684 
304 
599 
151 
5 

500, 
435, 
158, 
1752 
364. 
116 
858, 
167 
86, 
491. 
684. 



Total .115532. 00|115. 001 7428.441 2123.56 



1347 .041969 .251712 . 14|28234.43| 2939. 



—FINANCIAL. 



CHURCHES. 



.Ahoskie = . . . 

Jk-ulander 

Ashley's Grove. . . 

Askewville 

Bethlehem 

Bethany 

Brantley's Grove. 

-Buekhorn 

■Capehart's 

Cashie 

Center Grove.... 

•Chowan 

Christian Harbor 

Coleraine 

Connaritsa 

Creeksville 

Conway 

Elam 

Galatia 

Green's X Roads 
Harrellsville .... 

Hebron 

.Hillside 

Holly Grove 

Holly Springs. . . . 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Lawrence's 

Lewiston 

Margarettsville . . 

Mars Hill 

Meherrin 

Mount Carmel. . . 

Mount Tabor 

Murf reesboro .... 

Menola 

Merry Hill 

'Oak Grove 

Pine Forest 

Potecasi 

Pleasant Grove.. 

Powellsville 

Republican 

Rich Square 

Roanoke 

Roquist 

Roberts' Chapel. . 

Ross's 

Riverside 

Sandy Run 

Seaboard 

Siloam 

Severn 

-St. John's 

Union 

Winton 

Woodland 



a 

tug 



161.18 
81.21 
17.30 
10.00 
22.00 
20.00 
28.20 

105.35 
20.00 
41.55 
20.00 

100.10 
28.03 
74.27 
27.50 
27.00 
43.51 
15.00 
16.00 
15.00 
22.00 
31.35 
5.00 
33.75 
8.86 
26.85 
35.00 
13.00 
15.00 
42.45 
16.00 
51.33 
35.12 
16.00 

162.43 
70.00 
27.65 
23.51 
17.15 



35.26 
35.00 
33.71 
29.00 
59.45 
7.00 
4.00 
68.30 
41.77i 



'S 'm 



120.18 
83.31 
26.50 
20.00 
55.00 
48.00 
30.17 

169.26 
40.00 

116.35 
38.75 

114.32 
34.49 
91.82 
37.50 
34.00 
59.25 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
40.00 
48.81 
8.00 
40.78 
18.06 
28.00 
35.00 
14.00 
35.00 
52.45 
20.00 
60.82 
61.30 
30.00 

111.31 
62.66 
60.90 
27.00 
18.83 



5.62 
1.02 
5.25 



2.00 



8.64 



5.00 



10.20 



35.001 
12.00 
2.50 
50.00 
11.00 
68.50 
74.-33 
72.81 



63.82 
43.30 
43.12 
36.40 
85.90 
10.00 
4.001 
103.581 
50.001 
13.871 
.35.001 



134.03 



10.00 



a; § 



149.46 

300.00 
21.00 
5.25 
48.69 
22 AO 
15.70 

177.70 
25.00 

129.52 
60.00 

226.12 
61.58 

199.15 

104.21 
45.00 

102.26 

152.67 
12.00 
13.00 
20.00 
25.04 
3.00 
23.00 
6.83 
35.75 
25.56 
6.00 
21.00 

159.23 



10.00 



1.95 
82.00 



11.50 



22.00 



,25 



10.65 



100.85 

115.00 
30.00' 

246.68! 

107.82 
60.15 
16.40 



10.00 

ie.'oo 



3 


10 


150.60 






33., 37 


6 


56 


77.69 


12 


74 


72.00 






175.00 






24.00 






136.12 


2 


.50 


104.22 



25.00 



7.60 



10.00 



16 


00 


2 


50 


100 


00 


27 


00 


68 


93 


70 


..52 


68 


18 



5.00 



47.00 
18.00 
75.00 
71.59 
109.48 



Total I 2166.281 2788.94|216.66i 3958.09 307. 70|585.02|256.69|1049.43| 



71.75 



15.00 
10.00 



> 7.50 
39.00 



5.00 
22.00 

5.00 

7.50 
25.00 

5.00 
20.00 

8.00 
35.00 

5.00 
16.40 
10.00 



10.00 
10.18 
7.00 
5.00 
5.00 
6.00 
2.00 
10.00 
10.00 
5.00 
7.00 
3.00 
5.00 
10.00 
6.00 
8.80 
15.00 
5.00 
18.70 
34.12 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 



12.00 
10.00 
20.00 
7.00 



4.05 



39.28 
10.00 



10.00 
5.00 



15.00 
4.40 
15.00 
20.09 
5.00 



$ 5.00 



5.00 



5.00 
3.35 

15.00 
5.00 
9.62 
7.00 

10.00 
5.00 
8.00 

14.40 



3.00 



4.00 
6.00 
5.00 
1.00 
10.00 



6.35 
5.00 



6.00 
10.00 

4.00 

5.28 
10.00 

5.00 



5.00 
5.00 
3.00 



5.00 
5.00 
8.00 



5.00 



6.16 
6.00 



10.00 
4.00 



9.01 
5.00 



4.52 
3.00 



oo 



9.00 
9.30 
37.75 



29.21 
'63! 67 



20.00 
36.00 
21.90 



57.80 



11.00 



4.00 
31.88 



12.43 
15.00 



30.00 
"25".66 



151.53 



83.68 
23.50 



20.88 
10.25 



209.90 
32.50 



95.35 
7.70 



532.61 
583.54 

95.47 

66.05 
255.44 
125.40 
152.68 
758.16 
134.02 
422.04 
174.75 
672.66 
210.21 
500.57 
231.36 
186.00 
335.52 
229.95 

85.00 
118.64 
169.30 
167.42 

31.00 
167.58 

91.49 
126.95 
165.14 

76.00 
117.00 
360.33 

92.00 
411.11 
317.02 
114.00 
796.00 
509.13 
198.15 
196.82 

77.50 
5.68 
353.54 
186.50 
261.46 
194.54 
434.95 

63.05 

12.00 
663.24 
.324.99 

13.87 
125.00 

60.00 

15.00 
342.76 

87.40 
397.78 
334.40 
23 4.47 
14268.24 



TABLE II 



CHURCH 



PASTOR AND POSTOFFICE. 



CLERK AND POSTOFFICE. 



Ahoskie 

Aulander 

Ashley's Grove 

Askewville 

Bethlehem 

Bethany ■ 

Brantley's Grove... 

Buckhorn 

Capehart's 

Cashie ■ 

Center Grove ■ 

Chowan 

Christian Harbor.. 

Coleraine 

Connaritsa 

Creeksville 

Conway 

Elam 

Galatia -^y 
Green's X Roads. 

Harrellsville 

Hebron 

Hillside 

Holly Grove 

Holly Springs 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Lawrence's 

Lewiston 

Margarettsville ... 

Mars Hill 

Meherrin 

Mount Carmel 

Mount Tabor 

Murfreesboro 

Menola 

Merry Hill • 

Oak Grove 

Pine Forest 

Potecasi 

Pleasant Grove.. 

Powellsville 

Republican 

Rich Square 

Roanoke 

Roquist ... ••• 

Robert's Chapel.. 

Ross's 

Riverside 

Sandy Run 

Seaboard 

Siloam 

Severn 

St. John's 

Union 

Winton 



C L. Dowell, Ahoskie 

R. L. Gay, Aulander 

D. Cale, Potecasi 

H F. Brinson, Tunis 

C. L. Dowell, Ahoskie 

J. O. Alderman, Edenton 

H. F. Brinson, Tunis 

D E. Dailey, Como ' 

T. T. Speight, Windsor 

D P. Harris, Windsor 

S. B. Barnes, Merry Hill 

D P. Harris to June 1st 

R B. Lineberry, Coleraine... 
r' B. Lineberry, Coleraine... 

M P. Davis, Aulander 

J. W. Downey, Woodland... 
W. B. Waff, Conway 

D. Gale, Potecasi 

T. T. Speight, Windsor... 

H. F. Brinson, Tunis' 

E F. Sullivan, Murfreesboro. 



C. C. Hoggard, Ahoskie 

W. H. Mitchell, Aulander 

J K. Revelle, Conway 

J G. Butler, Askewville 

R. J. Hoggard, Coffleld 

E. E. Daniel, Coleraine 

G. E. Holloman, Ahoskie 

H. J. Vann, Como 

H. J. Ward, Merry Hill 

W R. Cobb, Windsor 

C' S. Godwin, Ahoskie 

M. R. Herring, Winton 

J. H. Evans, Harrellsville 

C. B. Morris, Coleraine 

J. P. Slade, Aulander 

W. H. Davis, Conway 

J. F. Martin, Conway 

J. E. Daniel, Pleasant Hill... 
W. C. Smith, Seaboard 

G. W. Castellow, Windsor... 
A C. Holloman, Harrellsville. 

H. T. Vann, Woodland 



H. F. Brinson, Tunis 

H. F. Brinson, Tunis 

J. F.' Cafe, Roxobel 

D. Cale, Potecasi 

S. B. Barnes, Merry Hill 

J. F. Cale, Roxobel 

W. B. Waff, Conway 

T. T. Speight, Windsor 

E F. Sullivan, Murfreesboro.. 

L.' A. Parker, Woodland . . 

C W. Scarborough, Murfreesboro 

o' c Davis, Murfreesboro 

F. Sullivan, Murfreesboro. , 

O. Alderman, Edenton 

L. Dowell, Ahoskie 



L A. Parker, Menola 

J. W. Downey, Woodland 

H. F. Brinson, Tunis 

T. T. Speight, Windsor 

J. F. Cale. Roxobel 

D. Cale, Potecasi 

D. P Harris, Windsor 

L. e! Daily, Como 

R. B. Lineberry, Coleraine 

J. O. Alderman, Edenton 

J W. Downey, Woodland 

L. A. Parker, Woodland 

S. B. Barnes, Merry Hill 

W. B Waff, Conway 

S. B. Barnes, Merry Hill 

E F. Sullivan, Murfreesboro. 
T S Crutchfield, Gatesville. . 



woodland • : : : : :;;^^,_w,_Downey,j^^^ 



M. R. Barnes, Como 

C. S. McGlaughn, Tunis 

Edwin Wright, Jackson 

C. L. L. Cobb, Kelford 

A C. Lassiter, Lasker 

J. M. Britt, Merry Hill 

J. J. Peele, Lewiston , . . • 

Jordan Edwards, Margarettsville 

W. B. Miller, Coleraine . 

J. J. Parker, Murfreesboro....... 

C. G. Hasty, Seaboard 

H. P. Gatling, Ahoskie 

J D. Babb, Murfreesboro 

J. F. Cowan, Woodland 

S. A. Adams, Merry Hill 

S. E. Marsh, Aulander 

J. R. Carstarphen, Garysburg. . .. 

E. B. Lassiter, Potecasi 

A. R. Harman, Aulander 

M L. Ravnor, Powellsville 

A. V. Cobb, Windsor - 

Willie Edwards, Rich Square 

R. W. Warren, Rich Square.^., 

J. M. Pritchard, Windsor. 

W. J. Beale, Pendleton 

J. T. Hoggard, Windsor 

W. Williams, Merry Hill 

Paul Jilcott, Roxobel 

J G. Joyner, Seaboard 

L. H. Speller, Windsor 

W. H. Howell, Severn 

E. W. Baggett, Ahoskie 

John Freeman, Ahoskie 

W. H. Lassiter, Winton .. 

Lewter McDaniel, Woodland. 



—STATISTICAL. 



CHURCH. 



Time of 
Preaching. 


Value of 

Church 

Property. 


Seating 
Capacity. 


Baptized 


Received 
by Letter. 


Restored. 


Dismissed 
by Letter. 


Excluded. 


Died. 


2nd-4th 


$ 8,000 


700 


6 


7 


1 


21 


2 


2 


1, 2, 3, 4 


2,500 


700 




4 




15 


3 


6 


2nd 


2,500 


500 




13 

59 




1 






1st 


1,360 


600 


3 


.... 

2 








lst-3rd 


3,000 


450 


6 


• • • • 


2 


6 


1 


2 


2nd 


1,200 


500 


20 


6 


1 


7 




1 


2nd 


1,000 


400 


8 


4 


1 


2 


"'5 


1 


2nd-4th. 


6,000 


500 


17 


4 


3 


2 


7 


2 


lst--3d 


1,000 


500 


14 




2 


44 


1 


10 


1, 2, 3, 4 


20,000 


650 




' "5 




10 




3 


3rd 


1,000 


400 


9 


1 


1 


7 


3 


2 


lst--3rd 


3,000 


350 




2 




10 


1 


2 


2nd 


2,000 


400 


10 


15 




3 


2 


1 


lst-3rd 


7,000 


800 


23 


8 


4 


10 


10 


4 


3rd 


2,000 


500 


17 


2 




6 


2 


12 


3rd 


1,500 


1000 


5 


2 




5 


1 


1 






10 


10 




6 




1 




3rd 


1,200 


500 


9 




2 




2 


3rd 


1,500 


400 


18 


1 




5 




6 


3rd 


500 


400 




2 


1 




1 


5 


4th 


2,000 


250 


8 


8 


1 


4 




3 


4th 


1,600 




3 


3 


4 


12 


2 


3 














3 




1 


1st 




400 


19 


2 


2 


3 


. . 


2nd 


1,250 


300 


17 


6 




8 






3,000 


300 


5 




4 




2 


3rd 


2,500 


500 


5 


9 




6 


"5 


4th 


3,000 


400 


9 


2 




1 


1 


2 


1st 


1,500 


250 


6 






20 


9 


1 


1st 


2,500 


400 


8 


• • -j 




2 


2 


2 


1st 


1,250 


500 


3 


2 




3 




1 


4th 


3,000 


500 


33 


7 


3 


8 


"i 


2 


lst-3rd 


2,000 


1500 


25 


4 


4 


25 




1 


4th 


1,500 




10 


5 


2 


7 




3 


lst-3rd 


2,000 


800 


3 


1 




13 




1 


1, 2, 3, 4 


2,000 


250 


8 


21 




5 




3 


2nd 


3,600 


500 


9 


3 




1 




4 


3rd 


1,300 


500 




5 




10 




2 


2nd 


1,000 


500 






'"i 


4 


"*5 




1st 


1,000 


400 


4 




1 


1 






2nd 


2,000 


600 


3 


10 


3 


13 


3 


1 


2nd 


2 000 


600 


3 


5 




g 




3rd 


3,'000 


500 


9 


9 






1 


"'2 


2nd 


3,500 


600 


35 


5 


1 


6 


5 


2 


2nd-4th 


2,250 


400 


12 


9 




4 






4th 


1,700 


400 




5 






1 


1 


2nd 


500 


300 










1 


lst-3rd 


2,000 


400 


14 


14 


2 


3 


1 


1 


4th 


3,000 


1000 


54 


1 


3 


57 




32 


2nd 








40 








4th 


4,000 


650 


18 


1 


2 


1 




2 


3rd 


1,000 




9 






1 




1 


4th 


1,000 


200 


2 


1 


1 


6 


" "'9 




2nd-4th 


2,000 


400 


10 


3 




4 


1 






1,500 


500 


4 


5 




2 


4 


"i 


2nd-4th 


2,500 


300 


8 


3 




6 


1 


2nd-4th 


2,000 


350 


13 


2 


2 


6 


2 


'"i 


lst--3rd 


1,600 


400 


1 


1 




1 




....| 



Ahoskie 

Aulander , 

Ashley's Grove... 

Askewville 

Bethlehem 

Bethany 

Brantley's Grove. 

Buckhorn 

Capehart's 

Cashie 

Center Grove 

Chowan , 

Christian Harbor. 

Coleraine , 

Connaritsa 

Creeksville 

Conway 

Elam 

Galatia 

Green's X Roads, 

Harrellsville 

Hebron 

Hillside 

Holly Grove 

Holly Springs 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker , 

Lawrence's 

Lewiston 

Margarettsville . . , 

Mars Hill 

Meherrin 

Mount Carmel 

I Mount Tabor 

I Murfreesboro 

Menola 

Merry Hill 

Oak Grove 

Pine Forest 

Potecasi 

Pleasant Grove. . . , 

Powellsville 

Republican 

Rich Square 

i Roanoke 

Roquist , 

Robert's Chapel. . . 



Riverside . . 
Sandy Run 
Seaboard . . 
Siloam . . . . 
Severn . . . . 
St. John's . 

Union 

Winton . . . . 
Woodland . 



Total 



|138,810|26200| 543| 349| 59| 420| 104| 139|559016699|1228^ 



TABLE III 



CHURCH. 



SUPERINTENDENT. 



Ahoskie 

Aulander 

Askewville 

Ashley's Grove 

Bethlehem 

Bethany 

Brantley's Grove. . . 

Buckhorn 

Capehart's 

Cashle 

Center Grove 

Chowan 

Christian Harbor... 

Coleraine 

Connaritsa 

-Creeksville 

Conway 

Elam 

Galatia 

'Green's X Roads.. 

Harrellsville 

Hebron 

Hillside 

Holly Grove 

Holly Springs 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Lawrence's 

Lewiston 

Margarettsville 

Mars Hill 

Meherrin 

Mount Carmel 

Mount Tabor 

Murfreesboro 

Menola 

Merry Hill 

Oak Grove 

Pine Forest 

Potecasi 

Pleasant Grove 

Powellsville 

Republican 

Tlich Square 

Roanoke 

Roquist 

Robert's Chapel 

Hoss's 

Hiverside 

Sandy Run 

Seaboard 

"Siloam 

Severn 

St. John's 

Union 

Winton 

"Woodland 



w. L. Curtis vr:. 

W. H. Mitchell 

W. G. White 

C. R. Revelle 

R. J. Hoggard . . .V. . . 

J. M. Perry 

S. A. Dilday W?.. 

R. A. Majette. . . *f . . 

H. J. Ward 

J. H. Mathews 

C. S. Godwin ... 

M. R. Herring . . k . 

A. B. Buiich U. . 

W. G. Adams 

J. D. Jenkins 

Edwin Lassiter 

A. Lassiter 

C. L. Stephenson 

W. A. Davis 

D. S. Dempsey... .. 

B. F Williams, k". . 
J. P. Griffin. 

E. W. Waters 

W. T. Hewitt 

K. R. Israel ♦"f.. 

P. J. Long 

J. E. Tyler 

W. R. Bridgers 

J. W. Keeter 

W. J. Barnes 

Jordan Edwards 

J. C. Miller 

J. K. Parker 

T. J. Stephenson. . . . 

J. W. Boone rT. . 

J. B. Barnacasal. k". 
H. W. Griffith. ..£•.-: . 

J. T. Keeter 

S. E. Marsh . 

L. A. Jordan 

C. G. Powell . . . . 

C. A. Dunning. . .*-r. . 

J W. Raynor 

E. E. Ward 

Albert Vann 

W. F. Nelson 

W.' H. ' Stephenson . . . 

Worley Cowan 

W. Miller 

!S. J. Gillikin 

J. R. Crocker 

E. Leggett 

J. W. Hoggard . 

E. W. Baggett ST 

J. R. Horton 

T. L. Lassiter 

C. H. Griffin 



POSTOFFICE. 



Ahoskie .... 
Aulander . . . 
Askewville . 
Conway .... 

Cofield 

Coleraine . . 
Ahoskie .... 

Como 

Merry Hill 
Windsor , . . 
Ahoskie .... 
Winton .... 
Harrellsville 
Coleraine . . 
Aulander . . . 
Conway .... 
Conway .... 
Garysburg . . 
Seaboard . . . 
Windsor . . . . 
Harrellsvile 
Woodland . . 



Cremo 

Tunis 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Merry Hill 

Lewiston 

Margarettsville 

Coleraine 

Murfreesboro . 

Seaboard 

Winton 

Murfreesboro . 

Woodland 

Avoca 

Aulander 

Garysburg 

Potecasi 

Woodland 

Powellsville . . . 

Windsor 

Rich Square... 
Rich Square... 

Pendleton . 

Windsor 

Merry Hill ... 

Roxobel 

Seaboard 

Windsor 

Severn 

Ahoskie 

Ahoskie 

Winton 

. Woodland .... 



—SUNDAY SCHOOL. 



CHURCH. 



Officers and 
Teachers. 


Scholars. 


Total 

Enrollment. 


Number of 
Schools. 


Number Church 
Mem. in School. 


Months 
kept open. 


Average 
Attendance. 


Number of 
Baptisms. 


Contributions 
for Missions, 
Orphanage, etc. 


School Expenses 


Total 

Contributions. 


1 

16 


1 

O20 


236 


1 




12 


166 


g 


*R ^^(^ fin 


(E 77 1 7 




12 


150 


162 


1 




1 o 


120 




108 . 00 


72 .00 


180.00 


21 


128 


139 


1 


76 


12 


85 


3 


17.82 


21.96 


oy . 1 


1\ 


138 


149 


1 


127 


12 


92 




6! 70 


30! 00 


36 70 


10 


86 


96 


1 


68 


9 


60 


'"e 


28! 69 




68^69 


11 


93 


104 




64 


9 


60 


3 


5.00 


7.87 


12.87 


9 


158 


167 


i 


102 


12 


80 


7 


23.19 


39 . 95 


63 . 14 


9 


95 


104 


1 




12 


66 


12 


204 '. 25 


27 '. 10 


231 35 


7 


62 


69 


1 


62 


8 


37 


13 




3.68 


3.68 




235 


246 


1 




12 


101 




160.00 


52 .00 


212 .00 




80 


87 


2 


' 70 


9 


50 


6 


6o!oo 


20.00 


80.00 


10 


91 


101 


1 


74 


12 


71 




173.51 


31^98 


205 . 49 


10 


92 


102 


1 




12 


54 


io 


40.30 


18 .00 


58.30 


10 


197 


207 


1 


iis 


12 


88 


9 


59 . 00 


48 61 


117 61 


9 


93 


102 


2 


72 


9 


42 


11 




6.97 


6.97 


12 




126 




100 


12 


85 


5 


15 . 00 


12 . 00 


27 '. 00 


10 

8 










12 


75 




70.00 


35! 00 


105 . 00 


80 


88 


1 


63 


12 


37 


'9 


142 . 43 


25 15 


167.58 


10 


86 
93 


96 


1 


77 


9 


33 
60 










7 


100 


I 
-I 


70 


12 




22.14 


35.68 


57.82 


6 


60 


66 


.... 


A O 


12 


38 


' * ' 4 

7 


60. 18 


11 .23 


71.44 


10 


76 


86 
40 


1 


51 


12 


59 


3 


27 .75 


42.00 


69.75 


10 


84 


94 


1 




12 


49 


19 


18.00 


33.07 


54 .07 


9 


75 


84 


1 




12 


45 


8 


6.83 


30.50 


37 .33 


5 


56 


61 


1 


' 45 


12 


50 




35.75 


31 .78 


67 53 


9 


120 


129 


1 


60 


12 


85 


i 


71 .06 


52.44 


123 50 


11 


131 


142 


1 




12 


95 


9 


29 16 


35 00 


64 16 


8 


73 


81 


1 




9 


50 


2 




10 loo 


luloO 


14 


225 


239 


1 




12 


130 


7 


115.93 


61.18 


177.06 


7 


36 


43 


1 


* 20 


12 


26 


3 




25.00 


25 .00 


11 


120 


131 


2 


90 


12 


74 


25 


134 03 


10. 50 


144 '. 53 


10 


65 


75 


2 




12 


45 


11 


66 ".15 


48.50 


114 65 


8 


87 


95 


1 




12 


59 


7 


30.00 


16 80 


4fi 8A 


12 


81 


93 


1 


* 83 


12 


77 


3 


129 93 


4.1^ 1 fi 


1 7^ f\Q 
HD . oy 


21 


135 


156 


1 






80 




67.82 


26. 14 


93.98 


7 


76 


83 


1 




12 


45 


9 


41.51 


52.63 


94 14 


9 


77 


86 


1 




12 


40 






12 '. 52 


12 '. 52 


9 


50 


59 


1 




12 

8 


30 






12 00 


1 9 nr» 
1^ . uu 


Q 


45 


51 


3 


io 


18 


1 




5.00 


5 .00 


14 


134 


148 


1 


118 


12 


90 


2 


81.75 


27^56 


109.31 


7 


61 


68 


2 




6 


33 


5 


18.02 


5.38 


23.40 


8 


110 


118 


1 


70 


12 


80 


8 


72.33 


31.30 


103 . 63 


11 


96 


107 


1 




12 


35 


35 


12.74 


14.75 


27.49 


12 


150 


162 


1 


"ioe 


12 


100 


6 


70.00 


96.46 


166.46 


6 


55 


61 




49 


12 


40 




24.00 


10.50 


34.50 


15 


90 


105 


1 




12 


80 


14 


171.32 




171.32 


51 


327 


378 


6 


'305 


8 


313 


39 


30.36 


49.28 


79.64 


10 


60 


70 


1 




9 


55 




13.87 
54.66 


7.20 


21.07 


12 


153 


165 




"iio 


12 


96 


' 'i4 


23.32 


27.98 


7 


68 


75 


. . 




12 


42 


9 


10.00 


12.00 


22.00 


11 






2 




12 




2 


6.35 


3.49 


9.84 


23 


95 


118 


1 




12 


' '88 


10 


88.43 


46.22 


135.66 


7 


85 


92 


1 


' '60 


9 


70 


1 


18.00 


10.00 


28.00 


12 


103 


115 


1 


79 


12 




7 


75.00 


23.38 


108.38 


10 


61 


71 


1 


57 


12 


" '57 


5 


63.59 


36.00 


99.59 


9 


115 


124 


1 


94 


12 


75 




86.09 


22.21 


108.30 


597 15602 16199 


63 


2763 


.... 


....| 371 


3023.23 


1535.60 


4558.33 



Ahoskie 

Aulander 

Askew^ville 

Ashley's Grove... 

Bethlehem 

Bethany , 

Brantley's Grove. 

Buckhorn 

Capehart's 

Cashie 

Center Grove 

Chowan 

Christian Harbor. 

Coleraine 

Connaritsa 

Creeksville 

Conway 

Elam 

Galatia 

Green's X Roads. 

Harrellsville 

Hebron 

I Hillside 

Holly Grove 

. Holly Springs. . . . 
,; Jackson 

Keif or d 

Lasker 

Lawrence's 

Lewiston 

; Margarettsville . . 
, Mars Hill 

Meherrin 

Mount Carmel. . . . 

Mount Tabor 

Murf reesboro . . . . 

Menola 

Merry Hill 

Oak Grove 

Pine Forest 

! Potecasi 

Pleasant Grove. . . 

Powellsville 

Republican 

Rich Square 

Roanoke 

) Roquist 

Robert's Chapel. . 

Ross's 

Riverside 

Sandy Run 

Seaboard 

Siloam 

Severn 

St. Johns 

Union 

Winton 

Woodland 



Total 



1 



MISSIONARY SOCIETIES. 



CHURCHES. 



PRESIDENTS AND POSTOPPICES. 



Ahoskie 

Askewville 

Ashley Grove. . . . 

Aulander 

Burkhorn 

Brantley's Grove. 

Chowan 

Conway 

Cashie 

Capehart's 

Christian Harbor. 

Coleraine 

Creeksville 

Galatia 

Holly Springs . . . . 

Harrellsville 

Hebron 

Holly Grove 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Lewiston 

Lawrence 

Meherrin 

Mars Hill 

Murf reesboro . . . . 

Merry Hill 

Menola 

Mount Tabor . . . 

Oak Grove 

Potecasi 

Pleasant Grove. . 

Roanoke 

Robert's Chapel 

Republican 

Rich Square . . . . 

Sandy Run 

Severn 

St. John's 

Union 

Winton 

Woodland 



Total 



Mrs. E. Hayes, Ahoskie . 

Hattie S. Hughes, Askewville 

Mrs. C. R. Revelle, Conway 

Miss . Blanche Pritchard, Aulander. 

Mrs. E. T. Dardeu, Como 

Mrs. J. W. Overton, Ahoskie 

Mrs. J. C. Scarborough, Winton.... 

Mrs. Willie Lassiter, Conway 

Mrs. 1^. F. Pierce. Winasor 

Susie R. Cobb, Merry Hill 

Jimmie Jernigan, Harrellsville.... 
Mrs. R. B. Lineberry, Coleraine.... 

Ijucy Davis, Conway 

Mrs. D. W. Taylor, Seaboard 

Mrs. H. J. Harrell, Cofield 

IMrs. A. C. Williams, Harrellsville. 

I Mrs. P. M. Futrell, Woodland 

Lillie Holloman, Cremo 

Mrs. S. J. Calvert, Jackson 

jNIrs. M. W. Harrell, Kelford 

Mrs. Annie Whims, Lasker 

Mrs. H. B. Clark, Lewiston 

Lizzie Langdale, Merry Hill 

Mrs. J. R. Parlver, Murfreesboro. . . . 

Minnie Newsome Coleraine 

Mrs. D. A. Day, Murfreesboro.... 



Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 



Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 



H. G. Snipes, Woodland 

E. B. Vaughan, Winton 

W. M. Marsh, Aulander 

C. G. Powell, Potecasi 

Mattie Jenkins, Aulander 

W. J. Hedgpeth, Rich Square. 

W. J. Beale, Pendleton 

J. G. Ward, Windsor 

J. P. Lassiter, Rich Square... 

P. L. Harrell, Roxobel 

J. L. Long, Severn 

Christiana Summers, Aulander. 

Bessie Taylor, Ahoskie 

S. P. Taylor, Winton 

Irene Vaughan, Woodland 



70 
21 
29 
100 
66 
30 
15 
21 
441 
241 
24 



.$ 138.71 
19.33 
37.80 

127.66 

121.45' 
48.08 

196.33 
20.49 

102.05 
17.36 
11.64 

104.40 
36.00' 



601 
i 231 



13.50 
60.14 
33.24 
27.05 
28.70 
63. 
15.00 
21.00 
15.35 
32. < 



20| 
36| 



96.36 
8.80 
40.25 

147.75 
20.35 
97.83 
30.81 
35.10 
28.58- 
41.80 
91.05 

140.40^ 
42.20 
2.70 
82.95 

137.70 
75.35 



|1314|.$2412.14 



Ahoskie . 
Cashie . . 
Potecasi . 
Woodland 



YOUNG WOMANS' AUXILIARY. 
Miss Nannie Newsome, Ahoskie... 

Miss E. Sewell, Windsor 

Miss Mary Johnson, Potecasi 

Miss Mary Harrell, Woodland... 



Total 



Ahoskie 



BAPTIST 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S UNION. 
Miss Bettie Sessoms, Ahoskie. 



Ahoskie - 

Aulander 

Ashleyjs Grove. . 

Buckhorn 

Brantley's Grove 

Chowan 

CasTiie 

Coleraine 

Hebron 

Holly Grove . . . . 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Meherrin 

Mount Tabor . . . 

Potecasi 

Republican , 

Sandy Run 

Severn , 

Union 

Winton , 

Woodland 



SUNBEAM SOCIETIES. 

Mrs. C. C. Hoggard, Ahoskie. . 

Ivey Modlin, Aulander 

Claude Askew 

Hugh, Picot, Como 

Mrs. G. B. Overton. Ahoskie.. 

Miss Bessie Lee, Winton 

Mrs. J. Bridgers, Windsor 

Miss Martha Wliite, Coleraine. 

Frank Vann. Woodland 

Cordis Harman, Powellsville. . 

Lebam Parker, Kelford 

Nita Lassiter, Lasker 

L. B. Jenkins, Murfreesboro... 

Erma Parker, Winton 

Golah Joyner, Potecasi 

Miss E. Bazemore, Windsor.... 

Helen Lassiter, Roxobel 

Miss Elsie Lewter, Severn 

Jessie M. Mathews, Ahoskie... 
Miss Pearl Jenk^'ns, Winton... 
Harry Griffin, Woodland 



Total 



31.20 
6.46 
28.71 
18.50 



I 35|$ 84. 8T 



1251 



11.22 



401 

351, 
51 1 



5.25 
25.59 

9.91 
23.49 

2.' 

14.00 
9.57 

44.00 
5.03 
5.02 

19.50 



261 
.351 . 
621 
291 



10.04 
37.48 
5.23 

' "8.'68 
4.78 
9.50 

27.19 
5.41 



5821$ 271.75 



Chowan 
Potecasi 



ROYAL AMBASSADORS. 

R. J. Britton, Winton 

Robert Beale, Potecasi... 



81$ 
121 



5.10 
2.80 



Total 



1 20|$ 7.90 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



Thirty-Second Annual Session 

OF THE 



West Chowan 



Baptist Association, 

HELD WTTTl 

Harrellsville Baptist Church, Hertford Co., 

October 27th, 28th and 29th, 1914. 



The next session will be held with Jackson Church, Northampton 
County, beginning on Tuesday after the first Sunday in Oc- 
tober, 1915. To preach Introductory Sermon, S. 
N. Watson; alternate, R. B. Lineberry. 



GOLDSBORO, N. C. 
NASH BROS., PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 
1914. 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

Thirty-Second Annual Session 

OF THE 

West Chowan 

Baptist Association, 

HELD WITH 

Harrellsville Baptist Church, Hertford Co., 

October 27th, 28th and 29th, 1914. 



The next session will be held with Jackson Church, Northampton 
County, beginning on Tuesday after the first Sunday in Oc- 
tober, 1915, To preach Introductory Sermon, S. 
N. Watson; alternate, R. B. Lineberry. 



GOLDSBORO, N. C. 
NASH BROS., PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 
1914. 



STANDING COMIVIITTEES. 



State Missions— C. L. Dowell, J. H Mathews W c; n • 
Home Missions-H. H. Honeycutt, W E Se^ 
Foreign Missions— K. D Stukenhrnl a' ^r n lu'S' Jenkins. 
Ministers' Relief-J E Vann T t w n/'.^^.^^' ^- ^l^^- 
Education-D. P. Harris F P PrTtV t c?^^?'/- ^' 
Sunday Schools-^ R^Lineberry"^^ Watsof Aid. 
Orphanage— W. B Waff T q pVi!f^T,fi^7 2,' ' ^- ^^^^erman. 
Chowan Coliege-G.Tiineberry Tp'^S^ % X^T' 
Woman's Work-S. N. Watson, & W Scarboriugh,'^B s Gay. 

LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS. 

Dancy Gale 

C. L. Dowell Potecasi, N. C. 

S. B. Barnes ' Ahoskie, N. C.* 

C. W. Scarborough ' Merry Hill, N. C,' 

T. T. Speight Murfreesboro, N c' 

R. T. White V.'.V. Windsor, N. C.* 

J. R. Mathews ". . . , Conway, N. C. 

H. H. Honeycutt Aulander, N. C.* 

M. P. Davis "" Ahoskie, ^J". C.' 

jJ. F. Gale ••..Aulander, N G 

j*C. L. Merrill ' Roxobel, N. G.* 

;S. N. Watson Mayesville, N G* 

W. B. Waff " " Winton, N. c! 

O. P. Harris V.'.*.*. Conway, N. G.' 

P- E. Dailey Windsor, N g" 

^- F. Gale '// " Gomo, N. g! 

J. W. Downey Windsor, N. G. 

J- O. Alderman Woodland, N". G* 

T. S. Crutchfield. . . .V.V. Edenton, N. G.' 

F. Sullivan Gates ville, N. G.* 

^- B. Lineberry Murfreesboro, N. C. 

'Jesse Blalock Goleraine, N.' G.' 

^- !>• Stukenbrok ...'.*. .*.". .". .*. Roanoke Rapids, N.' C. 

Jackson, N. G. 

OFFICERS. 

• Gillam, Moderator 

S. Mitchell, Vice-Moderator Windsor, N. C. 

• W. Britton, Glerk Winton, N. G. 

• P. Thomas, Treasurer Winton, N. G 

B. Lineberry, Historian Coffield, N. G. 



CONSTITUTION. 



Name. 

Article 1. This body shall be known as the North Carolina West Chowan 
Baptist Association. 

Membership. 

Art. 2. It shall be composed of messengers elected by the churches con- 
nected with this body, and all ordained ministers who are members or pas- 
tors of said churches, together with the officers of this Association, and 
chairmen of all standing committees. Each church of one hundred members 
and under shall be entitled to two messengers, and for each additional one 
hundred members, an additional messenger: Provided, that no church shall 
have more than four messengers. 

Objects. 

Art. 3. The objects shall be to devise and recommend measures for in- 
creasiD.yg the harmony, the intelligence and the spiritual power of the 
churches, and for developing and directing their energies, their resources 
and their gifts, in advancing the Redeemer's kingdom in the earth. 

Powers and Prerogatives. 

Art. 4. The Association shall have no power to infringe upon the sov- 
ereignty or rights of the churches. It is neither an ecclesiastical nor legis- 
lative council, nor court of appeal. It may advise the churches and recom- 
mend measures of usefulness for their adoption, but can not bind them in 
any way. Yet, in view of the combined wisdom, piety and intelligence of 
the body, it may justly claim for itself, for its objects and for its recommen- 
dation the very highest consideration and regard. 

Art. 5. The Association may dissolve connection with any church that 
becomes heterodox in doctrine, or disorderly in practice, or that fails to 
represent itself, either by messenger or letter, more than two successive 
sessions, without sufficient reasons, or that treats with contempt its objects 
and requirements, or upon application of a church for dismission. 

Rights of the Churches. 

Art. 6. Each individual church shall hold and exercise all the functions 
of an independent church of Jesus Christ. As constituent members of this 
Association, the churches shall have right to advise, when desired, in case 
of difficulty, and. to suggest plans of usefulness to be adopted. It shall be 
the undisputed privilege of any church to withdraw its membership from 
this Association whenever it shall so elect. 

Duties of the Churches. 

Art. 7. It shall be the duty of the churches to appoint as messengers, as 
far as practicable, their most capable members, to require their attendance, 
and to send by them a contribution to the Association fund to pay for print- 
ing the minutes and other necessary expenses. 

Art. 8. It shall be the duty of each church to send an annual letter to the 
Association, giving: (1) Locality; (2) the names of its pastor and clerk 
and their respective postoffices; (3) the Sabbaths of regular service; (4) the 
church statistics, including the number baptized, received by letter, restored 
dismissed, deceased, expelled, and aggregate membership, male and female; 
(5) Sabbath School statistics; (6) amount contributed to benevolent objects 
and the Association Fund; (7) names of messengers and alternates; (8) anj 
other information deemed of special importance. 

Organization. 

Art. 9. The officers of this Association shall be a Moderator, Vice-Modera 
tor, Clerk, Treasurer, and Historian, who shall be elected at each annua 
session, from the members of the Association, and shall continue in offic* 
until the next annual election, which election shall be the next order o 



Constitution. 



5 



business after the enrollment of messengers. As soon as the new oflacers 
shall have taken their seats, the body shall be declared organized and pre- 
pared for business. 

Duties of Officers. 

Art, 10. It shall be the duty of the Moderator to open the meetings punc- 
tually at time appointed; to enforce the rules; to preserve order, and to 
exercise all the prerogatives of a pra(siding officer, according to the prin- 
ciples of parliamentary usage. 

Art. 11. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Moderator to discharge the duties 
of the Moderator in his absence. 

Art. 12. It shall be the duty of the Clerk to keep a faithful record of the 
proceedings of the body, and superintend the printing and distribution of 
same, and to keep on file the printed Minutes and other important docu- 
ments belonging to the body. He may appoint an assistant when necessary. 

Art. 13. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive and disburse the 
money contributed to the Minute Fund, as directed by the body, and make 
an annual report of same. 
; Art. 14. It shall be the duty o^he Historian, who shall be elected at each 
i annual meeting of the body, to prepare for publication in the Minutes an 
I historical sketch of the church with which the Association meets, with 
I obituaries, incidents, and other facts of the year that should be preserved, 
and make report to the next Association. 

Art. 15. This Constitution may be altered at any annual session of the 
body by a vote of two-thirds of the members present. 

Resolutions. 

I Resolved (1), That no church shall be entitled to representation in this 
body unless in perfect accord with the Constitution thereof, that fact to 
be ascertained by a committee of five on credentials, appointed at each 
session of the body immediately after organization; (2) the report of this 
committee shall be the property of the Association just as any other report. 
(Adopted 1898.) 
Resolved, That henceforth this Association withdraw fellowship from any 
I church that allows its members to engage in the manufacture and sale of 
Ij intoxicating liquors as a beverage. (1891.) 

I Resolved, That it is the sense of this Association that selling intoxicating 
' liquors through a dispensary is a violation of the spirit and letter of the 
resolution of our Constitution. (1905.) 



RULES OF ORDER. 

1. The Association shall convene annually at the time and place of its 
own adjournment. 

2. During each annual session it shall meet and adjourn from day to day 
at the hours fixed upon by the body. 

3. All meetings of the Association shall be opened and closed with religious 
exercises. 

1 4. A majority of the members present shall be a quorum for the tranisac- 
tion of business. 

5. No member shall absent himself temporarily without leave of the Mod- 
I erator, nor finally without leave of the body. 

6. No member shall speak more than twice on the same subject without 
permission of the body. 

I 7. No member shall be allowed to talk, stand up, read or move about the 
j house during business, except to gain or impart information under consider- 
ation. 

8. No committee shall be in session during the hour of business without 
J permission from the body. 

9. All questions of orider not herein provided for shall be decided by 
"Mell's Parliamentary Practice. 



6 



Order of Business. 



ORDER OF BUSINESS. 



First Day. 

10:00 A.M. — Devotional Exercises — Charles H. Jenkias. 

10:30 A.M. — Enrollment of Messengers, Organization, Invite Visitors, Read 
Constitution, Call Names of Churches that failed to report 
last year. Receive New Churches, Appoint Committees. 
11:15 A. M. — Orphanage. 
12:15 P.M.— Sunday Schools. 
12:45 P. M.— Recess. 
2:15 P.M. — Education and Chowan College. 
3:45 P.M. — Assignment of Homes. 

Adjournment. 
7:30 P.M. — Introductory Sermon. 
8:30 P.M. — Ministerial Relief. ^ 
Adjournment. 

Second Day. 

9:15 A.M. — Devotional Exercises. 

9:30 A.M. — Report on Church Statistics. 

9:45 A.M. — Report of Efficiency Committee. 
10 : 45 A. M.— State Missions. 
11:45 A.M. — Home Missions. 
12:45 P. M.— Recess. 

2:15 P.M. — Miscellaneous Business and Reports of Committees, y 

2:45 P.M. — Foreign Missions. 

3:45 P. M.— Woman's Work. 

Adjournment. 

C. L. DOWELL, 
M. P. DAVIS, 

D. P. HARRIS, 

Committee. 



PEOCEEDmGS. 



Harrelsville Baptist Church, Hertford County, N. C, Oct. 27, 1914. 
The West Chowan Baptist Association met this day in its thirty-second 
annual session with the Harrellsville Church, The introductory sermon 
was preached by W. B. Waff from Mai. 3:8. 

The Moderator, T. Gillam, called the Association to order, the roll of 
churches was called, and the delegates enrolled as follows: 
LIST OP DELEGATES. 

Ahoskie— C. G. Powell, C. C. Hoggard, W. T. Holloman. 

Aulander— W. H. Mitchell, C. H. Jenkins, W. S. Dunning, A. Early. 

Ashley's Grove— *G. N. Martin, *J. K. Vann, *W. G. Putrell. 

Askewville— A. J. White, J. H. Harris, *G. D. Hughes. 

Bethlehem— R. P, Thomas, W. A. Perry, A. Bass. 

Bethany— W. B. Outlaw, W. C. Hughes, J. M. Perry. 

Brantley's Grove — B. F. Barham, *L. R. Dilday. 

Buckhorn— *G. C. Picot, S. P. Winborne, H. J. Vann. 

Capeharts— *T. H. Phelps, W. L. Baker, J. R. White. 

Cashie— J. H. Mathews, E. L. Catling, W. L. Powell, W. T. Tadlock. 

Center Grove — L. J. Godwin, J. D. Jenkins. 

Chowan— W. P. Taylor, J. E. Vann, W. P. Shaw. 

Christian Harbor— J. W. Holloman, *J. L. Blythe, W. T. Taylor. 

Coleraine — *W. R. Raynor, *A. A. Pearce, J. D. Perry, J. E. D. Perry. 

Connaritsa — J. P. Morris, *J. H. Hall, Cleveland Mitchell, Calvin Pritchard. 

Creeksville — *C. W. Bridgers, *Nezzie Davis. 

Conway — P. C. Brittle, A. Lassiter. 

Elam— *T. J. Bass, *C. R. Kee, *R. A. Daniel. 

Galatia — J. T. Davis, W. C. Smith, W. A. Davis, James Davis. 

Green's X Roads — G. W. Castellow, C. W. Mizelle, George T. Mizelle. 

Harrellsville — ^W. E. Miller, J. P. Lowe. 

Hebron— J. E'. Griffin, P. M. Futrell, W. L. Johnson. 

Hillside — ^W. E. Saunders, *C. E. Hobbs. 

Holly Grove— P. A. Harmon, *J. J. Taylor. 

Holly Spring— W. D. McGlaughan, H. A. Piland. 

Jackson— B. S. Gay, P. M. Fleetwood, *R. G. Parker. 

Kelford— W. C. Evans, John E. Overton, C. L. L. Cobb. 

Lasker— D. Cale, T. G. Whims. 

Lawrence's — J. W. Langdale, J. R. Phelps, *B. F. Langdale. 
Lewiston — Wilmer Modlin, Fanning Craig, *R. L. Lodge. 
Margarettsville — J. G. Stancell, *Jordan Edwards. 

Mars Hill— E. J. Miller, D. E. Valentine. L. P. Freeman, K. R. Evans. 
Meherrin— J. T. Chitty, *John C. Chitty, *L. T. Garris, *W. S. Nelson. 
Mt. Carmel— L. L. Taylor, *T. J. Stephenson, *W. R. Wheeler. 
Mt. Tabor— J. W. Boone, E. B. Vaughan, T. M. Forbes. 
Murfreesboro — G. E. Lineberry, C. E. Boyette. 
Menola— J. T. Chitty, C. C. Liverman, *Kelly Vinson. 
Merry Hill— J. T. Keeter, T. M. White. 
Oak Grove — ^A. E. Saunders, Alex. Askew. 
Pine Forest — 

Potecasi — J. R. Baugham, *E. B. Lassiter, Lee Beale. 
Pleasant Grove— *M. L. Taylor, J. S. Hughes, *W. H. Lassiter. 
' Powellsville— G. W. Belch, J. J. Alston. 
Republican— A. V. Cobb, *E. E. Ward, W. F. Earley, G. W. White. 
Rich Square— * Albert Vann, W. J. Lassiter, *J. T. Bolton, *J. P. Holloman. 
Roanoke— *J. L. Newsome, W. J. Slade. 
Roquist — W. A. Tadlock, *M. E. Evans. 

Robert's Chapel— D. N. Stephenson, J. C. Taylor, R. E. Maddrey. 
\ Ross's— J. L. Morris, *W. R. Butler, *A. F, Castelow, J. W. Hughes. 



Mimites of the 

Riverside— C. C. Holder, William Williams. 

fandy Run-J. M. Jacobs, W. J. Watson *C. C Tyler. 

Seaboard— * J. T. Long, J. R. Crocker, A. J. Gay. 

Siloam— *E. Leggett, *G. D. Leggett. 

Severn— J. B. Mann, George H. Tyler. 

St John's— W. P. Howard, B. W. Raggett. 

Union— J. A. Copeland, J. R. Horton. 

Winton— J. S. Mitchell, A. R. Joyner. 

Woodland-H. C. Harrell, G. M. Holloman, J. W. Lee, 



The^Association adjourned with prayer by D. P. Harris. 1 

TUESDAY— AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The Association was called to order and was led in prayer by M. P. 

''w.'n. Johnson spoke briefly at this point on the 7^^, ^ i^^|f/,tf,^^th: 

lam, Moderator; J. S. Mitchell, Vice-Moderator; N. W. Bntton, Clerk, R. ^. 
Thomas, Treasurer, and R. B- Lineberry, Historian^^ 

J F. Cale read the Constitution and Rules of Order. Johnson, 

The following committees were appomted: 

Time Place and Preacher for the next session of this body-D. N. Steph 
enson, W. Morris, W. T. Tadlock. 

D. P. Harris read the report on Sunday Schools. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

the Sunday School. It ^r.^^f \°J°'^^ZT^l^^^^^^^ 

^^^^^^^Z^ir.^"^^ ms wor. heartuy as unto 



Wrst Chowan Baptist Association, 9 

wUness'S Tl" f^r ""17 T'^' ^'^'^ P^^^or will bear 

witness tnat it is far easier, and more satisfactory, to preach to thn«i 

Mount Tabor. Sandy Run. H"^;i„f aTfun^^Sf "tMs"^? a'^^rf eto^^^ 
'Th% uSon MeeC^:f,™'^^°^ ^r'^"- 'or our rssoJat7on~ 

Pisiiiiiill 

Report on Orphanage was read by T. T. Speight. 

REPORT ON THOMASVILLE BAPTIST ORPHANAGE 

South. I believe S P.nH^tTr. the greatest orphans' home in the 



10 



Mmutes of the 



Kennedy Memorial Home. What a little army of children, being fed, 
clothed and cared for in the name of God and humanity! 

Now, my brothers, let us rise in our might and the name of Jesus Christ 
ahd do more and greater things for our Lord and Master. God seems to 
open the hearts of some of our people that are well-to-do in this world's 
goods and they pour it into the treasury of the Lord; and then the poor 
come with their mite and say, "Glory to God on high, peace on earth and 
good will to all men," for this home is for my children! 

We recommend the one day's work as a gift. We also urge an increase 
in our gifts. We will need them. T. T. SPEIGHT, 

For Committee. 

M. S. Kesler, the General Manager of the Orphanage, spoke to the report, 
and it was adopted. 

Homes were assigned the delegates, and the Association adjourned till 
to-morrow morning, with prayer by L. Johnson. 



WEDNESDAY MORNING SESSION. 

Devotional exercises were conducted by T. T. Speight. 

The follovs^ing new pastors were given a. welcome: D. L. Merrill, K. D, 
Stukenbrok, H. H. Honeycutt. 

The report on Church Statistics was made at this point. 

DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS. 

Received — 

By Baptism . . 

By Letter .... 

By Restoration 
Loss — 

By Letter 

By Exclusion . 

By Death 



500 
380 

80— 960 

448 
113 

107— 658 



Gain 307 

Total Membership 12,597 

Expenses for Home Purposes — 

Pastors' Salaries $17,275.00 

Buildings and Repairs 19,627.67 

Poor 754.59 

Incidentals 3,305.50 

Sunday School Expenses 2,284.35 

Minute Fund 113.04— $43,360.15 

Contributions — 

Associational Missions $ 1.00 

State Missions 3,133.90 

Home Missions 2,687.60 

Foreign Missions 3,335.96 

Sunday School Missions 167.75 

Orphanage 4,015.80 

Ministerial Education 507.48 

Ministers' Relief 304.00 

Colleges and Schools 797,15 

Other Objects 5,137.20— $20,087.84 



Orand Total 



$63,447.99 



West CJioivan Baptist Association. 



11 



Number of Churches Contributing to the Different Objects — 



State Missions 58 

Home Missions 58 

Foreign Missions 58 

Sunday School Missions 22 

Orphanage 54 

Ministerial Education 46 

Ministerial Relief 40 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON STATISTICS, WOMAN'S MISSIONARY 

SOCIETIES. 

The Woman's Missionary Union of the West Chowan Association sends 
greetings to the General Association. Our work during the past year has 
Indeed been encouraging. We now have forty-four Woman's Missionary So- 
cieties enrolled in our Union; twelve Young Woman's Auxiliaries, thirty- 
eight Sunbeam Bands and four Royal Ambassador Chapters. There are in 
our Association fifteen churches without any missionary organizations. 

To the pastors: I would beg and plead that you v/ill give us your hearty 
co-operation and help us organize societies where none exist. 

Membership in our Woman's Missionary Societies, 1,535; Sunbeam mem- 
bership, 279; Y. W. A. membership, 960; R. A. membership, 60. Last year 
we gave $2,700 for missions, besides our regular contributions. Northampton 
County Union is supporting a kindergarten teacher in Japan, and Hertford 
County Union supports two Bible women in China. Besides this, the whole 
Union has undertaken this year to defray the expenses of a young lady at 
our training school, Louisville, Ky., which amount is $225, and most of 
which has already been raised. Bach county has a well organized Quarterly 
Union. 

God is richly blessing us in our efforts. We are praying that He will 
lead us on to still greater service. We feel so much our dependence upon 
the pastors of the Association. You can help us if you will. Won't you do 
this? Our women need only a little encouragement on your part, and we 
beg that you make this work yours. 

WILLIE LAM BERTSON. 
Vice-President of Woman's Missionary Union of West Chowan Association. 

Woman's Missionary Societies. 





No. of 


Amount 


Rate Per 




Members. 


Contributed. 


Member. 


Mount Carmel 


30 


$ 24.58 


$ 0.82 




29 


58.74 


2.03 


Ashley's Grove 


48 


58.82 


1.23 


Holly Grove 


30 


40.75 


1.36 


Murfreesboro 


30 


116.78 


3.89 


Bethlehem 


14 


15.84 


1.07 


Chowan 


33 


223.73 


7.09 


Ahoskie 


63 


198.36 


3.15 


Jackson 


25 


49.95 


1.99 


Oak Grove 


21 


11.31 


.54 


Meherrin 


46 


16.31 


.36 


Mount Tabor 




204.84 


4.39 


Harrellsville 




79.74 


5.32 


Roanoke 




29.80 


.72 


Lasker 




24.00 


.87 


Kelford 




50.00 


2.28 


\ Rich Square 








'1 Union 




101.16 


3.17 


1 Winton 




105.00 


5.00 


{ Sandy Run 


37 


131.50 


3.58 



12 



Minutes of the 





31 


111.67 


3.67 




50 


211.08 


4.23 




19 


37.69 


1.98 






172.65 






37 


95.30 


2.53 


Jl>1 cLLillKdy IS vjrrUV^ . . 




'to. I'i 


1 9Q 
Jl.Zv 


'PnTXT'Ol 1 G'tri 1 1 £i 


91 


±'±.oO 


• Do 


^iiiisiidn ridi uor . , 


1 Q 


1 1^ 91 


.oO 


"PI £i Q G O n r^Y* f\'\T z:^ 


9K 


OO.OO 






Sunbeam Bands. 








No. of 


Amount 


Rate Per 




Members. 


Contributed. 


Member. 


Kelford 


30 


$ 23.20 


$ 0.78 




16 


6.70 


.43 


Harrellsville 


12 


.92 


.07 




24 


10.00 


.42 




10 


2.50 


.25 






11.82 




Chowan 


33 


31.43 


".96 


Bethlehem 


25 


.74 


.03 




62 


6.84 


.11 




33 


3.95 


.12 


Pleasant Grove . . . 


29 


2.62 


.09 


Brantley's Grove . . 


25 


2.25 


.09 




44 


6.07 


.14 




34 


6.49 


.19 


Coleraine 


42 


96.00 


2.29 




34 


7.70 






40 


28.60 


.li 




26 


5.62 


.22 


Sandy Run 


52 


7.00 


.16 




23 


20.93 


.91 


Union 


17 


18.15 


1.06 




Y. W. A. Statistics. 








No. of 


Amount ' 


Rate Per 




Members. 


Contributed. 


Member. 




18 


$ 7.47 


$ 0.46 




18 


29.00 


1.62 


Chowan 


15 


1.00 


.08 




21 


28.57 


1.37 




Royal Ambassador Statistics. 








No. of 


Amount 


Rate Per 




Members. 


Contributed. 


Member. 




10 


$ 3.45 


$ 0.34 




15 


3.20 


.22 






3.05 





C. W. Scarborough read the report on Home Missions: 
REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

Last May the Home Mission Board made its seventy-ninth annual report. 
There is encouragement from its past successes, and inspiration for the 
future in opportunity and responsibility. We bring facts, gathered from 
eleven years of the Board's work, 1904 to 1914, inclusive. In 1904 the Board 
received $127,850 and baptized 8,017; in 1914 it received $397,589 and bap- 
tized 30,816. These figures mean that our work last year, in proportion to 
money expended and results reported, was done 20 per cent, cheaper and 
was 7 per cent, more successful than in 1904. This certainly commends 
our Home Board for economy and success. Look now at the total results 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



13 



of our work for these eleven years: Baptized, 238,656; additions to our 
church membership, 441,779. Then, too, the work of last year was, as to 
number baptized, 30,816, and additions to our church membership, 56,747, 7 
per cent, more successful than the average for the eleven years, and more 
fruitful, in visible results, than any one of the eleven years. "Matchless as 
this record, equally promising for the future, though less adapted to being 
shown in figures, was the development and efficiency work accomplished 
through the mission schools and enlistment activities of the Board." 

But our opportunities and responsibilities enlarge. They invite and urge 
to still greater efforts. "In 1880 the population of the South was 18,000,- 
000. Of the 33,000,000 here to-day, 22,000,000 make no profession of relig- 
ion. If we count off 4,000,000 who, from infancy or other causes, are irre- 
sponsible, there are still in the South to-day a mighty host of unsaved peo- 
ple, equal in number to the entire population in 1880." Are Baptists alone 
responsible for these? No. But 40 per cent, of all professing Christians in 
the South are Baptists, and therefore the burden of responsibility is ours. 
The work of our Home Board is divided into ten distinct departments: 
Mountain Mission Schools, Evangelism, Church Building, Cities, Indians, 
Negroes, Foreigners, Cuba, Canal Zone and Publicity. These ten depart- 
ments of work in co-operation with each other and with our State Mission 
Boards, may be included under three objects, viz.: (1) To evangelize the 
unsaved; (2) to develop and strengthen the life implanted from God; (3) 
to hold and train for the most efficient service those who have been won. 
These objects are worth while, and the necessity for work along these lines 
is urgent. Take evangelism and face the 18,000,000 lost souls in our terri- 
tory, and the 81,000 foreigners who came into our Southland last year; and, 
remember that while evangelistic efforts are more successful in the South- 
ern Baptist Convention than in any other part of the country, it is steadily 
becoming more difficult to win people to Christ, or to hold those who have 
been won to lives of efficient service. These difficulties have their causes 
in the changing conditions of life in our day. Machinery, transportation 
and intercommunication have largely broken up the old conditions of localism, 
independence and community spirit. Old habits and ideals are being swept 
away, and even the churches of Christ must adjust themselves to the 
change and learn how to make spiritual and direct the new life, or else lose 
their leadership and power. These changes cry out to us for a heroic and 
statesmanlike Home Mission program. Know, too, that true religion in the 
South never before met attacks so insidious as face us to-day. The Catholics 
would give a religion in name, but a closed Bible and saint-worship; Chris- 
tian Science (so-called), and Russellism, and many other false faiths would 
give a religion with a mutilated and perverted Bible. Note well also that 
all these modern false faiths agree in a deceitful but persistent effort to 
destroy the doctrine of the Lordship and Deity of Jesus Christ. The South 
is the last great stronghold and hope of the religion of the open Bible, 
with Jesus of Nazareth as the Divine Son of God. It is worth while to 
evangelize our people and the success of our Home Board's evangelists is 
gratifying. Since 1907 they have baptized 26,984, and last year they baptized 
8,414. 

Our Church Building and Enlistment Departments are bringing to us and 
attempting to solve the problems of our untrained and homeless churches. 
Forty-five per cent, of our Southern Baptist Churches gave nothing to mis- 
sions last year, and there are 3,689 of our churches with no house of wor- 
ship, and 120 of these are in North Carolina. These conditions we dare not 
ignore, and they appeal to us through our Home Mission Board. 

Nearly all of the 81,000 foreigners who came into our territory last year 
are without God and without hope, but they have brought their heathenism 
with them. What are we going to do about this menace to our civilization, 
which nothing but the Gospel can avert? Space forbids the mention, spe- 
cifically, of several departments of our Home Mission work, but those not 
so mentioned are of equal importance with the others. 



14 



Minutes of the 



We recommend: 

1. That our churches be encouraged to make larger use of the splendid 
free Home Mission tracts issued by the Home Mission Board at Atlanta, 
Ga., and to form mission study classes for men as well as for women. 

2. That clubs of subscribers be gathered in the churches for "The Home 
Field." 

3. That prayer be made in our churches for this great work, the saving 
and holding of the South for our Lord Jesus Christ. 

4. That our churches increase their contributions to Home Missions next 
year at least 5 per cent., so that our total shall not be less than $3,000.00. 

C. W. SCARBOROUGH, 
J. H. STEPHENSON, 
A. I. PARKER, 

Committee. 

The report was ispoken to by C. W. Scarborough, D. P. Harris, K. D. 
Stukenbrok. The report was adopted. 

On motion, it is requested that the churches raise for missions next year 
not less than the amount raised this year, and more if possible. 

M. P. Davis read the report on Foreign Missions: 

• REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

The Foreign Mission Board is located at Richmond, Va., and is composed 
of nineteen local members and eighteen members at large, representing 
each State in co-operation with the Southern Baptist Convention. 

The Board conducts work in Italy, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Japan, 
China and Africa. In these countries we have 380 churches, with 833 out- 
stations; 30,000 church members and 542 Sunday Schools, with 22,000 
scholars enrolled. We have also 9,376 students in mission schools, 420 of 
whom are in the theological seminaries and training schools seeking special 
preparation for Christian work. 

We have at present a force of workers 300 strong. In addition to these 
home-sent missionaries, we have on the combined fields 635 native workers. 
There were 5,252 converts baptized last year, the largest number ever re^ 
ported for a single year. The conditions give promise of still more abundant 
fruits, if we take advantage of the opportunities opening to us everywhere. 

Our successes have laid responsibilities upon us and are making demands 
of us which we cannot ignore without turning much of our success into fail- 
ure, and throwing away our God-given opportunity for still larger successes. 
On our mission fields multitudes have been made ready for the Word of 
God, thousands are awaiting training in the Christian life and for Christian 
service; our schools are overflowing, and multitudes of bodily sufferers are 
knocking at the doors of our hospitals for help. Unoccupied fields are in- 
viting us to the harvest. Need and opportunities are com]3ined as a mighty 
challenge to Southern Baptists. Nothing less than immediate and great 
enlargement can meet this challenge, which God has thrust upon us. 

Shall we prove ourselves worthy of so great a favor as God is ready to 
bestow upon us? Or shall we let it pass and thereby lose an opportunity 
which we have long prayed for? If we fail now, when God hath prepared 
the way, can we be considered faithful stewards? We are sufficient in num- 
bers, capable in talents and leadership, and able in material resources, 
notwithstanding the financial depression and cheap cotton. We can meet 
the challenge of a great opportunity if we will. The question is, will we? 

The twelve thousand Baptists of the West Chowan Association gave last 
year only $2,788.94. This is less than twenty-five cents per member. Is it 
not enough to cause us to hang our heads in shame and cease to boast of 
being a great Missionary Baptist body? Last year the Baptists of the 
South advanced in their gifts for Foreign Missions $44,000, while the great 
West Chowan Association fell off $23<^.72. Many of our members give lib- 
erally, but at least one-half of our people give nothing, and consequently 
will have no part in the blessed results and will have no part in the glorious 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 



15 



rewards to be bestowed. Is there not some way to enlist all our members 
in this great work? 

The task of the Southern Baptists, of which we are a part, for the pres- 
ent year includes: (1) The completion of the Judson Fund; (2) the en- 
listment of the un-enlisted; (3) the development of the present givers into 
larger giving; (4) the inauguration in each church of a plan of systematic 
monthly or weekly giving, so that the work may be taken care of and debt 
and interest may be avoided. We commend these four objects to the 
thoughtful consideration of the churches of our Association. 

In order to increase intelligence and to enable all our people to work 
together towards the same end, we recommend and urge that the Foreign 
Mission Journal be taken and read by every Baptist family within our 
bounds. That mission study classes be organized in every church, both 
among men and women. To this end we suggest that each pastor appoint 
a committee in each church of which he is pastor, to canvass the member- 
ship with this object in view. M. P. DAVIS, 

J. W. BOONE, 

Committee. 

This report was discussed by M. P. Davis, and was adopted. 
L. E. Dailey presented the report on State Missions: 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

The mission movement is not a modern movement. Many of the prophets 
were state and home missionaries. Some of them went beyond the home 
land. Jonah, for example, was sent as God's messenger to Nineveh. The 
mission spirit had its origin in the great heart of a merciful God. Its sac- 
rificial spirit reached its culmination when God gave his only begotten son 
to die for a lost world. The farewell message of Jesus to His disciples, 
known as the Great Commission, was but a continuation of this spirit. 

For convenience, we divide this commission into three divisions — State, 
Home and Foreign Missions, but in spirit it is one. 

The natural and v/ise arrangement is to begin at home. The Baptists of 
North Carolina for eighty-three years have been prosecuting the work of 
State Missions. During these years much has been accomplished to extend 
the kingdom of God within the borders of our State, yet the field is still 
white unto harvest. 

We cannot invest our money in any object that will yield a greater har- 
vest. The missionary church of to-day will be a great contributor to mis- 
sions to-morrow. The churches that manifested the greatest missionary 
zeal now were once fostered by our State Mission Board. Last year we 
raised a little over $50,000 for State Missions. Our missionaries reported 
2,688 professions of faith and 1,700 people were baptized. From these fig- 
ures we observe for every $8.60 expended for State Missions a soul is born 
into the kingdom of God. Many of us could give that amount annually and 
not be inconvenienced by so doing. If the reports are correct it costs 1,344 
times this amount to kill a man in the European war. Let us now notice 
our present situation. We are only asked to raise $55,000 this year for 
State Missions, just a little more than what it costs to kill two men in the 
conflict in Europe. Of this amount we have $39,000 still to raise, which is 
$5,000 more than we raised during the same period of time last year. 

We can do this if we will, in spite of the present financial depression. 
All that is required is the will to sacrifice and do. Let us bestir ourselves 
to action and enable our leaders to shout victory over the State on the 
night the books close. All that is necessary to do is for the Baptists of the 
State to average just a fraction over twenty cents apiece and the task will 
be accomplished. Surely in this State of plenty we could not wish to do 
less. 

In view of our present situation, we recommend: 

1. That every church that can possibly do so take a special collection 
for State Missions next month. 



16 Minutes of the 

2. That our Sunday Schools in the future take a special collection for 
missions at least once a quarter, and if they can have a mission day once 
a month, by so doing instill in the rising generation the true spirit of mis- 
sions. Respectfully submitted, 

L. E. DAILEY, 
PAUL FLEETWOOD, 
J. H. WHITE, 

Committee. 

Livingston Johnson addressed the Association on this subject, and the 
report was adopted. 

The Association adjourned for dinner, with the benediction by C. W. Scar- 
borough. 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The Association reconvened and was led in prayer by J. O. Alderman. 

On motion, it is ordered that the report on Education be postponed until 
the evening session, and that the report on Chowan College be now con- 
sidered. 

Report on Chowan College was read by J. E. Vann. 

CHOWAN COLLEGE. 

God made woman, not only to be man's companion, but his equal. How- 
ever, there has been from the most remote antiquity, until comparatively 
recent years, an unjust discrimination against her, caused by man-made law. 
Not until after the Norman Conquest was she considered much above a 
slave or beast of burden; and even during the reign of Henry VIH she was 
considered more of a chattel than a legal personage. Such a law or cus- 
tom was an unjust discrimination against her, and was but a relic of an- 
tiquity continued through the dark ages, and promulgated by the Feudal 
Lords of England, and yet this inhuman and barbarous law, or custom, was 
transmitted to this country by our ancestors and continued to be the law 
until very recent years. Until 1868 woman in this civilized and Christian 
land of ours was classed in her legal rights with infants and idiots. Our 
Baptist fathers, some 60 years ago, rebelled against Petruchio's theory, 
that woman was the chattel or property of man, and in resisting this theory 
they caught an ideal which was little less than divine; their religion taught 
them that woman should be free and that the doctrine of universal educa- 
tion should be proclaimed, and that boy and girl should have the same 
opportunity for an education. Urged on by the spirit of public sentiment 
they built at Murfreesboro, N. C, B. F. Institute, which is now known 
as Chowan College. This <^ollege was built in a day when modern improve- 
ments and conveniences were unknown. They encountered all manner of 
difficulties, but through sacrifices, labor and toil, spurred on by the spirit of 
love which knew no defeat, the college was completed. 

They builded well. These Baptist fathers in that day when money was 
scarce borrowed from a gentleman in this county the sum of $25,000 for 
the purpose of completing this building. It continued to owe this debt until 
after the war, when this country was made desolate — nothing was left but 
our real estate and our honor. The Trustees in this trying hour, but filled 
with love for the old college, settled this large debt by paying 50 per cent, 
of the amount out of their own private means, and having the college made 
over to them. The college was continued for several years under the own- 
ership and control of said Trustees. The college was not self-sustaining on 
account of the conditions of our country immediately after the war, and 
about 1877 or 1878 the Trustees donated the College to the Baptist denomi- 
nation on condition that for every $1,000 of stock which they held they re 
served to themselves a scholarship without limit as to time, to be given out 
to Indigent young ladies who wanted an education, with the further under- 



West Choivan Baptist Association. 



17 



standing that it was to be controlled by Trustees to be appointed by the 
Chowan Association. 

And thus it continued until 1909, at which time the management was 
changed by the authority and consent of the Association, wherein the Presi- 
dent and Faculty were employed and paid a stated salary, and the manage- 
ment was assured by the Chowan and West Chowan Associations, through a 
Board of Trustees. 

The old college since the first day she opened her doors for the reception 
of pupils has never been closed. The old college, located on one of 
the most beautiful spots in Eastern North Carolina, surrounded by the beau- 
ties of nature, stands forth to-day, and has stood through all the ages, as 
a beacon light to the young women of Eastern North Carolina. It has been 
orthodox in its religious and denominational teachings until it has flooded 
this section of the State with more cultured, refined, and religious Baptist 
women than perhaps can be found in any other portion of the world. By 
its uplifting power it has furnished our homes with cultivated wives, moth- 
ers, sisters and daughters, and has largely supplied our schools with 
teachers, and our churches with female worker's, and has in a great meas- 
ure stimulated the desire for higher female education throughout the State. 

With these facts before us and with such a history, will we not be re- 
creant to our highest duty, and disloyal to our denomination and to our 
best interests, if we do not stand by her and give her our support? She is 
worthy of your support, she needs your support; may we not expect it? 

The old college had as its President, until the beginning of this session, 
Dr. J. D. Bruner, a gentleman of high intellectual attainments, but who 
was a bundle of energy, egotism, deception and indiscretion, who was forced 
to resign on account of an outraged public sentiment. After Dr. Bruner's 
retirement the Trustees found that the college was overwhelmed with debts, 
ftnd perhaps the college has never seen a darker hour than she has ex- 
perienced within the last five or six months. Adverse criticism was freely 
given, far and wide; sentiment ran high. But the Board of Trustees, com- 
posed for the most part of men of prudence and with good business sense, 
in full sympathy with the best interests of the college and the Baptist de- 
nomination, grasped the situation like men. Although hampered with debt, 
they did not despair, or give up, but began to look about for a suitable man 
for President, and late in the summer secured a gentleman of experience 
in educational matters in North Carolina, a thorough Baptist, broad-minded 
and with discriminating judgment— Mr. G. E. Lineberry. With less time 
than a month to canvass for students, the old college opened this fall on 
schedule time with about eighty boarding students, which was beyond the 
expectation of the most sanguine. This fact is due to either one or two 
reasons, or it may be to both— the popularity of our new President, or to 
the love and devotion of our people to the old college. 

The new President and Faculty are in thorough accord, the student body 
contented and satisfied, and the sentiment and spirit is all that could be 
desired. 

I need not longer dwell on her noble deeds and glorious past, but let us 
turn to her future possibilities. The glories of the past will not suffice for 
the future. The college is in debt. May this Association do her full duty. 
Let no one say that this or that should have been done, but accept things 
as they are; think not of the past, but of the future. I pray that this As- 
sociation will rise en masse and say in their might that this old college 
j shall be free in order tbat she may better educate and bless our daughters 
yet unborn. Will you do it? ' COMMITTEE. 

This report was discussed by John E. Vann, T. T. Speight, C. W. Mitchell, 
T. Gillam, J. T. Williams, J. H. Mathews. On motion, the Trustees are re- 
quested to put an agent in the field to raise $5,000, which this Association 
assumes, to pay off the debt on Chowan College. The report was adopted. 

On motion, the following resolution was passed: 



18 



Minutes of the 



"RpliPvine that the work of our Association is not achieving the highest 
end al^oIHt and that in some respects our methods are antiquated; there- 

Resolved That the Moderator of this Association be empowered to ap- 
nofnt a committee of seven memherls, which shall be known as the Effi- 
Scy CoZSttee of the West Chowan Association to take m o considera, 
Hon Tnv chan-e in our methods of work or any other change that will aid 
n a Greater effic^^ncv in our Association, and to make such recommenda- 
l?onsasin thtr judgment will tend to this end, and report at our next 
regular session. 

The following constitute the Efficiency Committee: M P. ^aT_^^' J^; 
Dowell, J. F. Cale, J. H. Mathews, P. J. Long, C. H. Jenkms, J. T. Bolton 

^"on''mTtion"'^t' was resolved that all the churches of this Association, 
when sending their church letter to the Clerk, be requested to send there- 
ZIT f^d on a senarate paper, such information as they desire to go into 
Thf Historian's Srt wh^^^^^^ shall hereafter be considered as a. 

inrt nf such chiirch etter under Article 8 of the Constitution, and when 
there is TotfoSiof desired to be furnished, that the paper shall be sent 
so stating thereon, so that the Historian may know that it has not been 

""ThTAssociation adjourned, prayer by C. W. Scarborough. 



WEDNESDAY EVENING SESSION. 
In the absence of both Moderator and Vice-Moderator, C. H. Jenkins was 

K Poteafwls introduced and addressed the Association on ^^^^^^^^^^^ 
Education, after which short addresses were made by O. L. Strmgfield, H. H 
Honeycutt and K. D. Stukenbrok. T3^.p«t 
The Association adjourned with prayer by W. L. Poteat. 

THURSDAY MORNING SESSION. 
Devotional exercises were conducted by N L Shaw. The Associatio. 
wnc, oaiied to order by J. S. Mitchell, Vice-Moderator. 

K D StuLnbrok was elected a delegate to the Southern Baptist Co^a 
Tj w TTnnPvrntt D Cale and W. S. Dunning to the Baptist State 
Conv^n ion ""j. ?° cT was^erecll/a'member of the State Mission Board, 
C L Itowell was elected Vice-President ol the Foreign Mission Board 
On motTon, Tis ordered that Woman's Work be added to the work oJ the 

^On'nio?ron the thanks of this body were extended to the HarrellsvilW 
rhuroraid i'ts friends for their bountiful hospitality during this session 
C L Dowell D P Harris and M. P. Davis were appointed a Committee 

VSLTe ?Lrtti:port on Education which was —d >-t evening 

and further discussed this morning by D. Cale, R. B. LmeDerr^, ^. w. ^ 
borough. The report was adopted. 

REPORT ON EDUCATION. 

tr-rest!mTorfanr X 
dea but tte idea seems to separate education Chnstiamty m^^ am 

We believe we should encourage by our means, our P«f ^.M e^«J; 

eTurchrsVo°u^fn*o\r^?kT?oii-?^^^^^^^^^^ 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 19 
frZ:^eTj^^^^^^^^^^ -^J-en that are called of God to 

^ We also recommend taMng coll'ections in mJI ^"^^ 
July for this noble and worthy object ^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^ 

J. T. Williams presented the report on Ministers' Relief. ^' 
REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF 
.or'di^.^^if^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^-^^^^ ^-^am. J. M. Arnett is its Re. 

Jry yTa? ^hirh^v'^^a^cn^^Ltel'a ^ ^? ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^-t 
v^hich is judiciously invested Dur n^ fVZ. °ioi?Tf thousand dollars, 
:8 beneficiaries, who received SHt the r.t f I'^'^Sn^"'" ^^ny as 
Qaking a sum total of $3 250 55 lid hv k ° ^^^r each, 

he cross, whose days of activitv h^^ ^''^'^^ ^^^'^ veterans of 

■f old age. ^ activity have been circumscribed by the infirmities 

We believe that this board has a ereat w^n 
3re it. The task of raising that dfrf .hL important work be- 

se without any income-fTom befo^ ^^^^ dependent old 

ves unreservedly to the w^rk of slvin^ I ' ™^ give their 

[aster's cause here upon the earth Tl f f ' '^^^^^ ^''^ extending the 

"Slh^JuTl^ Nor^h"SL?r;a.^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ 

eyeU?rT'l9\t t5^ oLd'hTdTnvlstel ^'^'^ that on 

ilance of $l,524.5rmakTn<? a su^ tot.^^ $14,107.02; a cash 

ork should be vigor^sly Sroser^ed i^nt?i ^^^^^^^^ that this 

^ised and permanently Tnvested ;he l^-^?,'^^^ ^^ve been 

mual collections, would fore verremovp ?f. together with the 
ive already referred remove that dark shadow to which we 

Respectfully, 

J. T. WILLIAMS, 

e Baptist State Convention in ISSfi „t w ° '5™<Juced a resolution at 
nisters- relief board, and to lead the 1^1,^1"?°*™' '° ^^t^blish an aged 
ae this work was organized. ^ ' '''''''' Bdenton, at which 

rhe Finance Committee reuorted that urns ic v, 

nute fund. epoitea that $108.18 had been collected as 

REPORT OF TREASURER OP WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATTOM 

idit- 

*ec. 8. 1913, By amount paid Thomas Gillam. . . f 

1013, z ^zz/z^- ^asrrs.:-.^^-:- «ri' 

copies of Minutes Pnntmg 2,o00 

85.00 

'ct. 29, 1914, To balance due West Chowan Association 

Respectfully submitted, $124~16 
he report was adopted. THOMAS, Treasurer. 



20 Minutes of the 

The Time and Place Committee report as follows: Time, Tuesday afte 
the first Sunday in October, 1915; place, Jackson. To preach introductor: 
sermon, S. N. Watson or R. B. Lineberry. 

On motion, it is ordered that hereafter the Association pay the expense 
of its delegate to the Southern Baptist Convention, which expense is to b 
arranged for by the Finance Committee. 

HISTORIAN'S REPORT. 

From the Clerk of the Association we learn that the contributions froi 
thrchurches to State, Home and Foreign Missions are larger this yea 
than of any previous year. 

Buildings. 

Meherrin Church has erected a commodious house with modern Sunda 
Sclol rooms; Woodland has painted the church house and ^ade ^th 
impJover^eSs Creeksville has added a bell and belfry; the new church 
mverJfdeTas begun a house of worship and have it enclosed so it can 
use^ Askewville has completed the inside work of their house of worslii 
During the year houses of worship have been dedicated free of debt i 
Laske? and Menola Other improvements and Sunday School rooms ha. 
been added at Sandy Run, Ahoskie, Chowan and ^i^\Square Cashie Churc 
i-Q in a camnaisn to liquidate a $10,000 debt on church. Coleram paid 
or a paXr s home Mars Hill is building a pastor's home. HarrellsvU 
has remodeUed and beautified till they practically have a new house. 

Pastoral Changes. 

Rev S N Watson has become pastor of Chowan and Union; Rev. H 
Honeycutt is now pastor of Mars Hill, with twice-a-month preaching; 
also serves Harrellsville and Powellsville. Rev. K. D. Stuckenbrok 
taken charge as pastor of Jackson, Elam, Seaboard, and Mount Carm 
Rev S B. larnes becomes pastor of the new church at Riverside and R 
S P. Harris has this year been pastor of Askewville and Lawrence s. Cai 
hart's, Lawrence, Green's X Roads, Holly Grove and Merry Hill are formi 
a field for a pastor to live at Merry Hill. 

Chowan College. 

Upon the resignation of the President of Chowan College Prof ^ G. 
Lineberry has been made President and has taken charge with a skill 
terest and zeal that has awakened a better co-operation and mspired greai 
confidence in the future usefulness of Chowan College. 

Necrology. 

Colerain Church lost heavily in the death of Brother George M Matthe" 
This church also had six other deaths-two brethren and four sisters. Ch 
tian Harbor has lost by death three sisters ot valued service. Ross Chu 
OS? eleven members by death. Two of them aged brothers-Elisha^^^ 
Timothy Hoggard, aged 83 and 91. Bethany Church lost by death Brotl 
Lod plarce and others. Powellsville Church felt keenly the death 
Brother Thomas Mitchell. Askewville lost by death two sisters, Mrs A 
White and Mrs. J. C. Ymte, the latter the mother of Rev. Raleigh Wh 
Aulander has mourned the loss of Brother W. P. Hoggard, aged 63. _ He ^ 
a son of Rev. Thomas Hoggard, long and favorably known as a minster 
the gospel Severn Church has sustained a great loss m the death ot 
following members: Sister Bettie Starr Howell, a devoted Christian i 
church worker; Elder John Barnes, a faithful servant of God, and Dr. J. 
Hoggard, our "sweet singer in Israel." 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 21 

Harrellslville Church. 

Harrellsville Baptist Church was organized in 1872 by B B Williams R 

fc;^rT'n-- ^^^^^^ J- Luke as presbytery wifh 25 member^' 

>r. A. A. Dickerson, of Richmond, preaching thP sermnn tJ; "i®^^®/^' 

asters" S- A 'TV'^ Itr^JeTZ 

»ft T °- A Woodson, L. R. Pniitt, Braxton Craig, Rev. Donison J K 
ant, J. A. Speight, M. P. Davis, F. A. Clark, C. P Scott H F B;ir;nn" 

In 1883 the Chowan Association held its session with this church and at 
on Tow /^.^/f'^'o" ™= "lade, organizing the West Chowan kssocia 
g the nriv lejf"n7°w„'"r T ''^^^ '° assocLtion hav- 

orship ''rcv T T SneSS'"^ >n their beautiful newly finished house of 

ho?as h'lre aT\le o?gSzarn,''' t'^- 
The report was adopted. 

The Association adjourned, after singing "Blest be the tie that binds" 
ng thirty-one years ago, when the Association met here. Prayer bv S 
Watson. J -o. 

N. W. BRITTON, Clerk. ^' Moderator. 

■ NUTES OP l-l-^W'^^MAN^^ UmON 

^SSior.--' '^-=^'^"^^^ 

elses Ted bv nr w ?t f^if °- - "P®"'^'^ devotional ex- 

"LI; "Au'&^rthT P™^je°s„?'N\r!'' 

UnleVl'hThe^roi"'fH*K'' °' were read and approved 

'reater ?nteies^ oM b^.^^ess came the Secretary's Report, which showed 
,reater mteiest in the expense fund among the societies. 
Xhe Union discussed the matter of sending Miss Rosa Goodwin to tv,» 
>m,„g school. Remarks on the subject were maL bv Mrs T P HoUn 
in Mrs. Stukenbrok, Miss Barrus and Dr. SmHh The Union rSnrded 
thll tXTonVZ;'""'''' """^^ ™^ ^'^'^^^'^ meet'theirenfe^ 

s'^Loughf b°efore7h''n "^l"' from one to two 

a Place ''''' '° ''^e Committee on Time 

fhe Union was cordially welcomed by Mrs C A Hu-'eins nf cvh 

'eman , o,'un?:n • ^""^ ""''P""'" ""^-^^ President, Mrs John 

inflhrS v'^S '^New ? ^^'J "^^-^ accomplished 

> madf u 1 ^1 ''^"'^^ ^'''S societies were organized but still 

> made It clear that there was a great work to be done yet Especially 
^she show a great heed for the organization of societies irNorttampton 
^fter the singing of "The Woman's Hymn," Mrs M D Curtis of Ahn-tie 

Cll^M—rtlJen-ade^^i 



22 



Minvtes of the 



we give our timely help and co-operation to this school, which is so much 
in need of funds. 

Mrs. W. A. Miller, of Union, told the Union what value "In Royal Service" 
could be to a country society. She insisted that each society make a study 
of this valuable book. 

Mrs. Finch, of Rocky Mount, delighted her audience with an address on 
"Some of Our Present Day Opportunities." She showed the great need of 
Christ in heathen lands, m.entioning especially South America and Africa. 
Said she: "We must pray and wrestle with God for workers, for we need 
them as never before." The struggle is a luxury. Let what we do for 
Christ be our very best. 

"Echoes from the Jubilates," by Mrs. Herbert Jenkins, of Aulander. Mrs. 
Jenkins told especially of the Jubilate held in her own church. 

Tihe hour being late, the remainder of the programme was left for the 
afternoon session. Committees were appointed. The Union was dismissed 
with prayer by Mrs. C. G. Parker, of Woodland. 

Afternoon Session. 

The afternoon session was called to order by singing "The Morning Light 
Is Breaking." Mrs. R. B. Lineberry, of Colerain, led the devotional exercises 
of the hour. Next on the . programme was "Sun Beam Hour," led by Miss 
Willie Lambertson, of Rich Square. Reports from Sunbeam leaders were 
next in order. Some leaders brought encouraging reports from their bands. 

Miss Marguerette Tweedey, of Norfolk, Va., was introduced to the Union. 
She spoke of the "Settlement Work in Norfolk," to which she is devoting 
her time. Miss Tweedy told of the work that is being accomplished there 
among the foreigners, but she emphasized the fact that there is work to 
be done, even if you don't live in the city. There is work to be done at our 
very door. The foreigner is the great problem of the city. They come at 
the rate of one million per year. Seventy-five thousand come from non- 
Christian lands. God has sent these people to us to test us. What will we 
do? The Union was indeed fortunate in having Miss Tweedy bring to us 
such a message. 

The Woman's Missionary Society Conference was conducted by Mrs. E. 
L. Catling, of Cashie. Each point on the standards of excellence was dis- 
cussed. Those taking part in the discussion were Mrs. Finch, Miss Eunice 
Watson, Mrs. C. G. Parker, Mrs. Jenkins, Mrs. J. P. Holloman, Mrs. Lineberry, 
Mrs. Myers, Mrs. Catling, Mrs. Sykes and Mrs. Henry Davis. 

The roll was called and reports from societies made. 

The hour being late, the Union voted to dispense with the remainder of 
the programme and hear from the various committee. 

Committee on Time and Place made the following report: Cashie Baptist 
Church, last Wednesday in July, 1915. 

This report was adopted. 

Committee on Nominations made the following report: 
Vice-President, Miss Willie Lambertson. 
Associate Vice-President, Mrs. E. L. Catling. 
Secretary and Treasurer, Mrs. Herbert Jenkins. 
Superintendent of Junior Work, Mrs. Manly Curtis. 
This report was adopted. 

Committee on Obituaries submitted the following report: 

Whereas, God in his infinite wisdom has seen fit to remove from our midsi 

Mrs. Maggie Minton, of Aulander, Mrs. Charles Cullens, of Harrellsville; 

Mrs. Laura Madrey and EfRe Jenkins, of Union; Misses Bettie Taylor an( 

Mary Pierce, of Cashie; Mrs. Julia Battle, of Winton, and W. Howell, o 

Severn ; 

Resolved, That we as a Union lament the loss of these faithful workers 
Resolved, That we commend their lives as a memorial to those left be 
hind; 



West Chowan Baptist Association. 23 
1 . Resolved, That these resolutions be recorded in the minutes of the meet- 
1 MRS. J. W. OVERTON 

MRS. L. H. freeman' 
: The report was adopted. MISS KATE STORY, 

i Tied and the Secretary asked to send the Sessage ^''^ 
The Union adjourned with prayer. 

Evening Session. 

isoili^^^^^g/^Sr:;ry?i^^?>^^^ ^^^^^-^ "^^^^ — of the 

congregation, after which Dr W H qry^n^b ' f^^' ^^^^ by the 

Ision Board, delighted the audieroVwit^^^^^ member of the Foreign Mis- 
foollection was ?^el\lirt^^^^^^^^ i 

of the service the following resolutions were read ^ "^^^'^ 

,|in^he Zl'oTtZ 7oT' ''''''''' ''''' ^^^^^^^ --1^ ^^nd expression 

"What's this? For joy our hearts stand still 
And life IS loved and dear, 

SSy"un\o''of''.^esrcrran'L"'' "f-' '"'^■"*>^'« °' the Woman's 
Itude. Therefore, be it Association, wish to express our grati- 

if^^t^^'^^tS^^T^ ^i/S r--'^ ^-^-ary Society 
Joccasion; (2) for the c^raS. wpI.o^ ^ ""V. "^^^^ ^'^^ ^^^em on this 
ladies of the varioufsoSs nlm^^^^^^^ Z the 

(3) to the Methodists of rS Snuare^or th^^''^^ Methodist and Friends; 
jtheir hearty co-operation w,^h n« Z ^ ^^^^^h and for 

(officers who hre"^ served us so"% the _ day; (4) to the 

especially do we want to express on r i^^^^^^^^ P^^t year. 

President, Mrs. Freeman Lr hrr f.lnnhi/^^ f'^/.'?'' ^^tiring Vice- 

fountiful dinner se^^ed us irnn^H ^^'^'^^^ to our hostesses for the 

fn their homes; (I) to the visUorf I ^""^ hospitable reception 

Ho have given us such inspirit talis W^'f ' i ^""f-^^^ "^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ 
Smith for his soul-stirrino mSa^p S^^^^ ^® ^^^^ peculiarly grateful to Dr. 
:own for their Pres^c"liS~ ^S;Lnr"/8f '^^^ 
l^usic; (9) to the ushers for their nrft^^fni' ° ^^.^ "^^^'^ excellent 

eader and her band for the 'LTX f ^^^^ to the Sunbeam 

Wributed in any way to mak^t^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^o have 

father, through 4ose I'^ndness wi hi. T^^''^^ ^^2) to God our 

tnd to make plans fo? rhe^rt?nsTo\^71,L^^fnrdr^^^ llr^h^^^^ — 
Respectfully submitted. 

MRS. D. L. MYERS 
MRS. B. N. SYKES 
MRS. JIM ELEY 
MISS EUNICE WATSON, 
The report was adopted. Committee. 

ronouncTaf a^n^d'Hus famelo^'aHn^'''^ benediction was 

ftlssionary Union oftte"^el°t Chtwln^^s^ciatlo'n"' '"^^ = 

W^frT^^^J^^^^""^- President. 

WILLIE VIRGINIA LAMBBRTSON, Sec'y and Treas. 



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r 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



OF THE 



WEST CHOWAN 



Baptist Association 

HELD WITH 

JACKSON BAPTIST CHURCH 
NORTHAMPTON COUNTY 

OCTOBER 5 and 6, 1915- 



The next session will be held with Lewiston Church, Berti,e County, 
beginning on Tuesday after the first Sunday in October, 1916, 
To preach the sermon, K. D. Stukenbrok; 
alternate, H. H Honeycutt. 



RALEIGH 

The Mutual Publishing Company, Printers 
1915 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 



Missions — M. P. Davis, J. T. Bolton, C. G. Powell, Josiah Early, 
L. E. Dailey. 

Christian Education — J5hn P. Cale. P. J. Long, E. L. Gatling, 
Jesse Blalock. 

Christian Social Service — E. F. Sullivan, J. P. Holloman, K. 
D. Stukenbrok. 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS. 

Dancy Cale Potecasi, N. C. 

C. L. Dowell Ahoskie, N. C. 

S. B. Barnes Merry Hill, N. C. 

C. W. Scarborough Murfreesboro, N. C. 

T. T. Speight Windsor, N. C. 

R. T. White Conway, N. C. 

J. R. Mathews Aulander, N. C. 

H. H. Honeycutt Ahoskie, N. C. 

M. P. Davis Aulander, N. C. 

J. F. Cale Roxobel, N. C. 

T. C. Keaton Murfreesboro, N. C. 

S. N. Watson .Winton, N. C. 

N. J. Todd Winterville, N. C. 

D. P. Harris Windsor, N. C. 

L. E. Dailey Como, N. C. 

W. P. Cale .Windsor, N. C. 

J. W. Downey Woodland, N. C. 

*J. O. Alderman Edenton, N. C. 

*T. S. Crutchfield. . Gatesville, N. C. 

E. F. Sullivan Murfreesboro, N. C. 

R. B. Lineberry Coleraine, N. C. 

Jesse Blalock Severn, N. C. 

K. D. Stukenbrok Jackson, N. C. 

T. L. Brown Lewiston, N. C. 



OFFICERS. 



C. H. Jenkins, Moderator Aulander, N C. 

I J. F. Cale, Vice-Moderator ...Roxobel, N. C. 

N. W. Britton, Clerk Winton, N. C. 

R. P. Thomas, Treasurer Cofield, N. C. 

R. B. Lineberry, Historian Colerain, N. C. 



The officers constitute the Executive Committee of the Associ- 
ation. 



♦Pastor, but not residing in the Association. 



4 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



CONSTITUTION. 



Name. 

Article 1. This body shall be known as the North Carolina 
West Chowan Baptist Association. 

Membership. 

Art. 2. It shall be composed of messengers elected by the 
churches connected with this body, and all ordained ministers 
who are members or pastors of said churches, together with the 
officers of this Association, and chairman of all standing com- 
mittees. Each church of one hundred members and under shall 
be entitled to two messengers, and for each additional one hun- 
dred members, an additional messenger: Provided, that no 
church shall have more than four messengers. 

Objects. 

Art. 3. The objects shall be to devise and recommend measures 
for increasing the harmony, the intelligence and the spiritual 
power of the churches, and for developing and directing their 
energies, their resources and their gifts, in advancing the Re- 
deemer's Kingdom in the earth. 

Powers and Prerogatives. 

Art. 4. The Association shall have no power to infiing:e upon 
the sovereignty or rights of the churches. It is neither an ecclesi- 
astical nor legislative council, nor court of appeal. It may advise 
the churches and recommend measures of usefulness for their 
adoption, but can not bind them in any way. Yet, in view of the 
combined wisdom, piety and intelligence of the body, it may justly 
claim for itself, for its objects and for its recommendation the 
very highest consideration and regard. 

Art. ^. The Association may dissolve connection with any 
church that becomes heterodox in doctrine, or disorderly in prac- 
tice, or that fails to represent itself, either by messenger or let- 
ter, more than two successive sessions, without sufficient rea- 
sons, or that treats with contempt its objects and requirements, 
or upon application of a church for dismission. 

Rights of the Churches. 

Art. 6. Each individual church shall hold and exercise all 
the functions of an independent church of Jesus Christ. As con- 
stituent members of this Association, the churches shall have 
right to advise, when desired, in case o^ difficulty, and to sug- 
gest plans of usefulness to be adopted. It shall be the undis- 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



5 



t)uted privilege of any church to withdraw its membership from 
this Association whenever it shall so elect. 

Duties of the Churches. 

Art. 7. It shall be the duty of the churches to appoint as mes- 
sengers, as far as practicable, their most capable members, to 
require their attendance, and to send by them a contribution to 
the Association fund to pay for printing the minutes and other 
necessary expenses. 

Art. 8. It shall be the duty of each church to send an annual 
letter to the Association, giving: (1) Locality; (2) names of 
its pastor and clerk and their respective postoffices; (3) the 
Sabbaths of regular service; (4) the church statistics, including 
the number baptized, received by letter, restored, dismissed, de- 
ceased, expelled, and aggregate membership, male and female; 
(5) Sabbath School statistics; (6) amount contributed to benevo- 
lent objects and the Association fund; (7) names of messengers, 
and alternates; (8) any other information deemed of special im- 
I portance. 

Organization. 

Art. 9. The officers of this Association shall be a Moderator, 
Vice-Moderator, Clerk, Treasurer, and Historian, who shall be 
elected at each annual session, from the members of the Asso- 
ciation, and shall continue in office until the next annual elec- 
tion, which election shall be the next order of business after the 
enrollment of messengers. As soon as the new officers shall have 
taken their seats, the body shall be declared organized and pre- 
pared for business. 

Art. 10. In order to conserve time and not intefere with the 
main work of the body, this Association will not consider any 
routine or miscellaneous business except at the close of the dis- 
cussion of each general topic. 

Duties of Officers. 

Art. 11. It shall be the duty of the Moderator to open the 
meetings punctually at time appointed; to enforce the rules; to 
preserve order, and to exercise all the prerogatives of a presiding 
officer, according to the principles of parliamentary usage. 

Art. 12. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Moderator to discharge 
the duties of the Moderator in his absence. 

Art. 13. It shall be the duty of the Clerk to keep a faithful 
record of the proceedings of the body, and superintend the print- 
ing and distribution of same, and to keep on file the printed 
Minutes and other important documents belonging to the body. 
He may appoint an assistant when necessary. 

Art. 14. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive and 
disburse the money contributed to the Minute Fund, as directed 
by the body, and make an annual report of same. 



6 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



Art. 15. It shall be the duty of the Historian, who shall be 
elected at each annual meeting of the body, to prepare for pub- 
lication in the Minutes an historical sketch of the church with 
which the Association meets, with obituaries, incidents, and other 
facts of the year that should be preserved, and make report to 
the next Association. 

Art. 16. This Constitution may be altered at any annual ses- 
sion of the body by a vote of two-thirds of the members present 

Resolutions. 

Resolved (1) That no church shall be entitled to representa 
tion in this body unless in perfect accord with the Constitutio 
thereof, that fact to be ascertained by a committee of five on ere 
dentials, appointed at each session of the body immediately afte 
organization; (2) the report of this committee shall be the pro 
erty of the Association just as any other report. (Adopted 1898 

Resolved (2) That henceforth this Association withdraw fellow 
ship from any church that allows its members to engage in th 
manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors as a beverage 
(1891.) 

Resolved (3) That it is the sense of this Association that selling 
intoxicating liquors through a dispensary is a violation of the 
spirit and letter of the resolution of our Constitution. (1905.) 



RULES OF ORDER. 

1. The Association shall convene annually at the time and 
place of its own adjournment. 

2. During each annual session it shall meet and adjourn from 
day to day at the hours fixed upon by the body. 

3. All meetings of the Association shall be opened and closed 
with religious exercises. 

4. A majority of the members present shall be a quorum for 
the transaction of business. 

5. No member shall absent himself temporarily without 
leave of the Moderator, nor finally without leave of the body. 

6. No member shall speak more than twice on the same sub- 
ject without permission of the body. 

7. No member shall be allowed to talk, stand up, read or move 
about the house during business, except to gain or import in 
formation under consideration. 

8. No committee shall be in session during the hour of bus! 
ness without permission from the body. 

9. All questions of order not herein provided shall be decid 
by Mell's Parliamentary Practice. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7 



ORDER OF BUSINESS. 
First Day. 

10:00 a. m. — Devotional exercises — Rev. C. L. Dowell. 

10:30 a. m. — Enrollment of Messengers, Organization, Invite 

Visitors, Read Constitution, Call Names of 

Churches that failed to report last year. Receive 

New Churches, Appoint Committees. 
11:15 a. m. — Christian Social Service. 

(1) Orphanage. (2) Ministerial Relief. 
1:00 p. m. — Recess. 
2:00 p. m. — Christian Education. 

(1) Sunday Schools, (2) Colleges nnd Schools. 

(3) Ministerial Education. 
3:45 p. m. — Assignment of Homes. 

Adjournment. 
7:30 p. m. — Introductory Sermon. 
8:30 p. m. — Report of Efficiency Committee. 
9:30 p. m. — Miscellaneous Business and Report of Committees. 

Adjournment. 

Second Day. 

9:15 a. m. — Devotional Exercises — G. E. Lineberry. 

9:45 a. m. — Report on Church Statistics. 
10:00 a. m. — Missions. 

(1) State Missions. (2) Home Missions. (3) 
Foreign Missions. (4) Woman's Work. 

1:00 p. m. — Recess. 

2:00 p. m. — Missions Continued. 

3:00 p. m. — Report of Apportionment Committee. 

3:30 p. m. — Miscellaneous Business. 
Adjournment. 

S. N. WATSON, 
E. F. SULLIVAN, 
P. M. FLEETWOOD, 
Committee. 

I 



PROCEEDINGS 



Jackson. Xorthampton County. X, C, 

October 5, 1915. 

The West Chowan Baptist Association met this day in its 
thirty-third session with the Jackson Baptist Chnrch. 

The devotional exercises were conducted by J. AV. Dow- 
ney, after which the Vice-Moderator. J. S. Mitchell, called 
the Association to order. 

The roll of churches was called and the delegates were 
enrolled as follows : 

LIST OF DELEGATES. 

Ahoskie — W. H. Miller, C. G. Powell, F. G. Taylor. 
Aulander — C. H. Jenkins, W. H. Mitchell, W. S. Dunning. *C. 
W. Mitchell. 

Ashley's Grove — * Claude Gatling, W. A. Futiell, J. K. Revelle. 
Askewville — *A. J. White, *A. G. Mizelle, *W. G. White. 
Bethlehem — W. A. Perry, R. P. Thomas, O. H. Britton. 
Bethany — *W. C. Hughes, *Jerry Perry, *H. L. Parker. 
Brantley's Grove — W. E. Perry, *W. P. Willoughby. 
Buckhorn — S. P. Winborne, *D. B. Taylor, *H. J. Vann. 
Capeharts — W. T. D. Evans, T. H. Phelps, W. L. Baker. 
Cashie — *H. W. Early, J. H. Matthews, *J. H. Dempsey, * E. 
L. Gatling. 

Center Grove — J. D. Jenkins, *L. J. Godwin. 
Chowan — T. D. Boone, J. P. Mitchell. 

Christian Harbor — E. V. Grissom, J. L. Blythe, *W. A. Bunch. 
Coleraine — C. R. Brinkley, W. B. Byrum, *Z. P. Baker, *J. E. 
D. Perry. 

Connaritsa — Josiah Early, W. P. Morris, J. R. Slade. 
Creeksville — Edwin Lassiter, Nezzie Davis. 
Conway — A. Lassiter, B. J. Ricks, T. R. Davis. 
Elam — T. J. Taylor, C. N. Stevenson, *M. L. Daniel. 
Galatia — *Kinchen Taylor, *D. W. Taylor, J. H. Deberry, F. 
P. Barnes. 

Green's Cross Roads — *A. T. Davis, *D. S. Dempsey. *D. W. 
Castellow. 

Harrellsville — M. W. Newsome, B. X. Sykes. A. C. Holloman. 

Hebron — P. M. Futrell, W. E. Futrell, Paul Beale. 

Hillside— C. E. Hobbs, W. E. Saunders. 

Holly Grove — J. J. Taylor, P. A. Harmon. 

Holly Springs — *C. L. McGlaughon, *H. C. Eure. 

Jackson — P. J. Long, Edwin Wright. 

Kelford — *W. C. Evans, *W. C. Overton, K. O. Hall. 

Lasker — P. S. Askew, R. E. Peele, H. Davis. 



10 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



Lawrence's — J. W. Langdale, J. R. Phelps, T. R. Oder. 
Lewiston — Wilmer Modlin, Charlie Simons, Garvey Bazemore. 
Margarettsville — J. G. Stancell, A. B. Spivey. 
Mars Hill — Andrew Miller, R. P. Lowe, I. M. Biowne, J. C. 
Miller. 

Meherrin — W. P. Futrell, S. D. Cook, John C. Chitty, *C. H. 
Chitty. 

Mt. Carmel — C. R. Parker, J. R. Stephenson, *H. P. Spencer. 
Mt. Tabor — A. I. Parker, John A. Parker, C. W. Stephenson. 
Murfreesboro — G. E. Lineberry, *C. W. Gardner, Roger Wat- 
son, 

Menola — C. S. Edwards, *J. M. Eley, *A. J. Vinson. 
Merry Hill — *T. E. White, *Bruce White, *J. T. Keeter. 
Oak Grove — *A. E. Saunders, *J. B. Lassiter. 
Pine Forest — W. H. Camp, W. P. Garner. 

Potecasi — J. R. Baugham, *A. L. Lassiter, *L. M. Beale. j 
Pleasant Grove — * James N. Baugham, C. A. Dunning, *Willie 
Jenkins. 

Powellsville — Josiah Brown, W. H. Perry. 

Republican— E. E. Ward, Starkey Ward, A. V. Cobb, *J. K. 
Butler. 

Rich Square — J. T. Bolton, J. P. Holloman, *Wilber Bolton. 
Roanoke — W. F. Nelson, C. J. Futrell. 

Robert's Chapel — J. H. Stephenson, W. J. Beale, H. P. Steph- 
enson. 

Ross's — A. N. White, L. G. White, J. L. Morris, L. R. White. 
Riverside — *William Williams, *C. C. Holder. 
Sandy Run — A. T. Liverman, J. M. Jacobs, W. R. Smith, W. 
J. Watson. 

Seaboard — J. R. Crocker, *G. F. Gay, *Russell Edwards. . 
Siloam — *G. D. Legget, *E. Legget. I 
Severn — J. J. White, W. H. Maddrey. I 
St. John's — *W. P. Howard, *W. H. Britton. I 
Union — J. A. Copeland, *J. C. Brett, *John Freeman. I 
Winton — J. H. Jenkins, *W. H. Lassiter. f| 
Woodland — C. J. Vaughan, J. T. Brittle, H. P. Dunning. 

Officers were then elected as follows for the ensuing year : 
C. H. Jenkins, Moderator; J. F. Cale, Vice-Moderator; N. 
W. Britton, Clerk ; R. P. Thomas, Treasurer ; R. B. Line- 
berry, Historian. 

B. S. Gay and H. B. Hardy extended a welcome to the As- 
sociation, to which T. S. Crutchfield responded. 

R. T. Vann, J. S. Farmer and Livingston Johnson were 
welcomed, and invited to seats in the Association. 

The reading of the Constitution and Rules of Order was 
dispensed with. 

♦Absent. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 11 



Horton's Church recently organized made application for 
membership in this body. The Moderator appointed J. F. 
Cale, C. L. Dowell, and R. B. Lineberry a committee to ex- 
amine the orthodoxy of said church and report imme- 
diately. The committee and the delegates from Horton's 
Church retired and after duly considering the matter rec- 
ommended that the church be received, which was done, 
and the delegates from Horton's Church were extended the 
hand of welcome by the Moderator. 

The time having arrived for the report on the Orphan- 
age, E. F. Sullivan presented it. 

REPORT ON THE ORPHANAGE. 

For thirty years the Thomasville Orphanage has been growing 
from its infancy in the storm and stress of opposition to the 
greater Orphanage of today, which demands the respect, and ap- 
proval, and the gifts of every true Baptist in the State. 

Much has recently been accomplished in the way of needed 
equipment. This has made it possible to receive more children, 
thereby laying claim to stronger support from our churches. 

While we understand gifts of property and money amounting 
to the many thousands have recently been made to the Orphan- 
age, practically none of these large donations are available at 
present for the support of the orphans. The duty clearly falls 
back on us, just as it should, to care for the running expenses 
of the Orphanage. 

In the West Chowan Association, with fifty-eight churches 
reported last year, at least one half do not send monthly of- 
ferings from their Sunday Schools to the Orphanage. This is 
spoken of not in the way of censure, but to call attention to 
the great undeveloped resources of our Association. 

The "one day for the Orphanage" is another powerful possi- 
bility with our churches. We believe if properly presented and 
urged that no church in the Association would not liberally re- 
spond with gifts for the Orphanage on Thanksgiving Day. 

We recommend the suggestion by General Manager Kesler, 
at our last State Convention, that provision be made for helping 
worthy and ambitious orphans to higher schools after they leave 
the Orphanage. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ED. F. SULLIVAN, for the Committee. 

This report was discussed by E. F. Sullivan, K. D. Stuken- 
brok, G. E. Lineberry, T. S. Crutchfield, W. H. Mitchell, and 
was adopted. 

R. B. Lineberry read the report on Sunday Schools. 



12 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

Perhaps every Baptist in our Association professes to believe 
in Sunday Schools. We think that there is Bible authority for 
the Sunday School. "Assemble the people, the men and women 
and the little ones, and thy sojourner that is within thy 
gates, that they may hear, and that they may learn, and fear 
the Lord your God, and observe to do all the words of this law; 
and that their children, who have not known, may hear and learn 
to fear the Lord your God"; "Search the Scriptures", "Teach 
them to observe all things whatsoever that I have commanded 
you." We believe also that the Sunday School has the divine 
approval. A very high percentage of the number coming into 
our churches are from the Sunday School, and come because of 
the Sunday School teaching and influence. The Sunday School 
element of the church composes the most loyal church members — 
they attend church most regularly, they are least frequent in sin 
and subject to church discipline, they pay their church dues most 
promptly and cheerfully, and are the most liberal contributors 
to benevolent objects. This means that by using their oppor- 
tunities for Bible study they know more of their duty, and by 
attendance at service and by exercising their gifts according to 
opportunity, they not only become more efficient, but find in 
their service the real joy of Christian life. 

Now. we profess to believe the above, but do we really be- 
lieve it when more than half of the church members of the 
West Chowan Association are so unmindful of their opportunities 
and obligations that they never enroll as a member of a Sunday 
School? When more than half of our churches have not provided 
adequate Sunday School rooms and equipment for teaching, 
when very few of our schools have any real teacher training 
study, and when there is only one now and then that has any 
systematic arrangement for enlisting the entire community in the 
Sunday School? 

Our Sunday School Board, having utilized the experience of 
the most successful Sunday School woikers of the world, have 
plans and suggestions for greater efficiency in Sunday School 
work in its equipment, attendance, teaching and management. 
We therefore recommend that each Sunday School in our Asso- 
ciation preserve and display in some prominent place in the Sun- 
day School room the Standard of Excellence chart which they 
recently received, and work toward the aim of an A 1 Sunday 
School. We desire to commend the work being done in this 
direction by Brother H. J. Vann and his co-laborers. j 
Respectfully submitted, j 
R. B. LINEBERRY. j 

The report was spoken to by R. B. Lineberry, and was 
adopted. 

Committees were then appointed as follows — Finance 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 13 



W. H. Mitchell, W. J. Beale, and J. S. Shaw. Time, Place 
and Preacher for the next session of this body, E. F. Sulli- 
van, J. T. Bolton, and A. V. Cobb. Religious exercises, 
the pastor and deacons of Jackson Church. 

At this point the Association adjourned for dinner, the 
benediction pronounced by R. T. Vann. 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The Association re-assembled at about two o'clock and 
spent one half-hour in devotional exercises, which were 
le.d by T. S. Crutchfield. 

The committee on Time, Place, and Preacher made the 
following report, which was adopted: Time, Tuesday after 
the first Sunday in October; Place, Lewiston, K. D. Stuk- 
enbrok to preach the sermon; H. H. Honeycutt, alternate. 

The Report on Education was presented by D. P. Harris. 

REPORT ON EDUCATION. 

At the last session of our Baptist State Convention there was 
initiated a movement which promises to be far-reaching in its 
significance. Since 18 64 there had existed what we all know as 
"The Board of Education." But by the action of the Convention 
this was discontinued, and the present Board was appointed with 
far larger duties and greater authority. This Board is expected 
not only to raise and distribute funds for the education of young 
ministers, but to foster and promote all the educational agencies 
of our Convention. 

This new movement is not the result of sudden impulse, but 
of long-existing and deep-seated convictions. We believe we 
have seen the hand of God plainly leading in this effort to re- 
enthrone our Lord Jesus Christ, and give Him the place of pre- 
eminence in the insurgent world. 

The time is not afforded, neither does the necessity any longer 
arise for arguing the basis of education. We have long since 
passed beyond that day when the intelligent Christian must be 
convinced of the need of Christian Education. The greatest of 
all teachers, even our Savior, was a profound student; urging 
upon His disciples, in his last command, that they go into all 
the world and evangelize it by teaching. Probably no period 
of the world's history has been without some who felt the divine 
call to educate themselves and others for a greater service. 

We are not surprised, therefore, that our fathers begun the 
work of Christian Education by establishing Wake Forest Col- 
lege, and that this was followed by Chowan, Meredith, and with 
several academies. Thus Christian Education has at last taken 
its place in our thoughts and actual work, as fundamental and 
indispensable in bringing in the Kingdom of our Lord. 



14 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



Experience has shown us that religion without training is 
practically barren, and that training without religion is dangerous. 
We believe that the State has neither the right nor power to 
impart religious training and education. Therefore we cannot 
entrust to the State that function which is manifestly the blessed 
prerogative of Christian denominations; and as a denomination 
we, on account of this vital principle, as well as priceless heri- 
tage, must set our hearts and hands to the task of evangelizing 
the world, and teaching them all things whatsoever He has 
commanded us. 

As Baptists we cannot leave the education and training of 
our children to other denominations. We must build and equip 
and maintain and patronize our own schools and colleges. We 
must have a place in our church program for regular and syste- 
matic giving to our schools. It has come to the point where 
we must do this, or go down in defeat. Has it ever dawned 
upon our minds that each succeeding Legislature continues to 
enlarge the appropriations to the State schools? This makes it 
difficult for our denominational schools to live. It is the pur- 
pose of this new Board to keep our schools abreast with the 
times, and furnish to our sons and daughters all the privileges to 
be found elsewhere. 

Let us hope that our churches are opening their eyes to the 
conditions confronting us. Have we been blind to the fact 
that so many men who have filled the highest places in our re- 
ligious and secular life, have come from our Christian schools 
and colleges? Our churches must not close their eyes to the 
conditions about them, nor stop their ears when God calls them to 
the task of Christian Education, so essential to our great re- 
public. 

In view of these conditions your committee would beg to 
recommend that this Association heartily endorse the action of 
the Convention in launching this larger educational movement; 
that we earnestly request our churches to incorporate this ob- 
ject in their budget for regular collections, and that in view 
of the larger fiield of operation they endeavor to make a ma-^ 
terial increase in their gifts to Christian Education. I 

D. P. HARRIS, for Committee. I 

D. P. Harris addressed the Association on this report, 
after which T. T. Speight made a report of the work he 
has done as collector for Chowan College, stating that he 
had collected in notes and cash, $5,572.20. 

REPORT OP CHOWAN COLLEGE. 

For sixty-eight years Chowan College has been training and 
sending forth young women who have become leaders socially, 
mentally, and spiritually, not only in our own State and nation, 
but even in foreign lands. In no other section of North Caro- 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 15 



lina do we find so many cultured Christian homes. This is a 
high tribute to the splendid work of this institution. 

The present faculty consists of fifteen teachers, trained and 
fitted for their special work. 

Two literary courses are offered, one leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, the other Bachelor of Science. The usual four- 
teen units are required for entrance, sixty hours of college work 
are required for the B. A. degree, and sixty-one for the B. S. 
degree. This is in line with the best colleges of the South. Di- 
plomas are offered in piano, voice, art, and expression. In addi- 
tion to the technical training, the usual amount of literary work 
is required for each. 

Great care is taken to place about the students the best moral 
and leligious influences. All boarding students have recently 
come under the watch-care of the local church, joined the B. Y. 
P. U., and are arranging mission bands. During the past year 
leading denominational workers held special services for us, and 
similar arrangements have been made for this year. We are 
glad to have in our faculty a graduate of the Louisville Training 
School, who has charge of the Bible department and has added 
much to the spiritual life of the institution. 

Within the past year electric lights have been installed, the 
Science Building remodeled and greatly improved, many rooms 
and halls white-washed and repainted, an in-door gmynasium 
has been arranged, and the chapel seated with opera chairs. A 
well one hundred and seventy feet deep has just been completed, 
and connection made so that it will furnish the entire water 
supply for all the buildings. 

We are hoping that at an early date the entire indebtedness of 
the institution will be paid, many improvements made in build- 
ings and equipments, and the endowment fund greatly increased. 

Last year the Alumnae Association added to the Loan Fund 
about two hundred dollars, and the children of the late Maj. 
W. P. Shaw gave two hundred dollars in memory of their father, 
who was a devoted friend to the college. The late W. P. Taylor, 
in his will, bequeathed four thousand dollars to the college. 

We feel that the college has lost deeply in the deaths of two 
of her trustees, W. P. Taylor and T. J. Williams. They were loyal 
and true, and always ready to sacrifice for the interests of the 
institution. 

Last year the total enrollment was ninety-seven, this year one 
hundred and nine have already been enrolled. 

The students and teachers alike aie bending their best energies 
to make this the best year in the history of the college. 
Respectfully submitted, 

G. E. LINEBERRY. 

The reports on Education and Chowan College were 
discussed by R. T. Vann, Gr. E. Lineberry, J. H. Mathews, 
and T. Gilliam, and were adopted. On motion, the words 



16 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



Christian Education are substituted for the words Ministerial 
Education. 

J. S. Farmer spoke briefly on the work of the Recorder. 
Homes were assigned the delegates, and the Association 
adjourned, with the benediction by J. F. Cale. 

TUESDAY EVENING SESSION. 

After a short song service, S. N. Watson, the appointee, 
preached the Associational sermon from John 21 :19. 

The order following the sermon Avas Ministerial Relief, 
on which short addresses were made by K. D. Stukenbrok, 
T. T. Speight, and R. E. Peele. 

On motion the program committee is requested to prepare 
a two-days' session for the meeting at Lewiston next year. 

The Association then adjourned. The benediction was 
pronounced by Livingston Johnson. 

AVEDNESDAY MORNING SESSION. 

Devotional exercises were conducted by E. F. Sullivan. 
The Statistical Report, which appears elsewhere, was then 
read and adopted. 

M. P. Davis read the report of the Efficiency Committee. 

REPORT OF EFFICIENCY COMMITTEE. ' 

Your committee begs leave to report as follows: 

I. We recommend that the work of this Association be classi- 
fied and grouped under the following divisions and subdivisions: 

(1) Missions; (1) State Missions; (2) Home Missions; (3) 
Foreign Missions; (4) Woman's Work. 

(2) Christian Education — (1) Sunday Schools; (2) Colleges 
and Schools; (3) Ministerial Education. 

(3) Christian Social Service — (1) Orphange; (2) Ministerial 
Relief. 

II. We recommend that this Association appoint a standing 
committee for each general division, whose duty it shall be to 
prepare a report on same, which report shall cover the sub- 
divisions under each general division. 

III. We recommend, in place of our present financial plan, the 
following: That the Moderator appoint a standing committee 
of six to be known as the Apportionment Committee, whose duty 
it shall be to present a budget, stating the amount needled for 
each object from this Association, and that this committee ap- 
portion said amount among the churches. That this apportion- 
ment be read out in public session before final adjournment, the 
amounts to be accepted or changed by the messengers from the 
several churches. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



17 



IV. We further recommend the following to be known as Arti- 
cle 10 of the Constitution: 

In order to conserve time and not interfere with the main 
work of the hody, this Association will not consider any routine 
or miscellaneous business except at the close of the discussion of 
each general topic. 

That Articles under "Duties of Officers" be Articles 11, 12, 13, 
14, 15, 16. 

M. P. DAVIS, 
JOHN F. CALE, 
J. T. BOLTON, 
J. H. MATTHEWS, 
C. L. DOWELL, 
N. W. BRITTON, 
CHAS H. JENKINS. 
P. J. LONG, 

Committee. 

The report was discussed by M. P. Davis. Livingston John- 
son, D. Cale, T. T. Speight, C. H. Jenkins. D. P. Harris. T. 
S. Crntchfield, and was adopted. 

C. L. Dowell read the Report on State Missions. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

State Missions is the effort of North Carolina Baptists to 
evangelize the people of their own State, and to organize and 
train them for Christian citizenship and worthy service. 

Eighty-four years ago our forefathers realized the importance 
of co-operation among the churches to accomplish this task, and 
organized the Baptist State Convention. Jesus told His disciples 
to begin at Jerusalem, and the founders of this enterprise be- 
gan with fundamentals. If we would lengthen the cords we must 
first strengthen the stakes — Home and Foreign Missions follow 
naturally. Conditions civic, social and religious, are always 
changing and centers of population shift whether in rural dis- 
tricts, in growing towns or in the great cities; and so long as 
there are changing conditions there will be need for State Mis- 
sions, because there we find religious destitution. God has sig- 
nally blessed our people. The weak struggling 1.5,000 Baptists 
of 1830 have grown into the great militant host of 256,000 who, 
in 1915, are marching to the conquest of the State and of the 
world for our King. State Missions aims — (1) to strengthen 
the weak churches in the rural districts where the membership 
has become depleted by constant removals; (2) to build churches 
in growing towns where there are few Baptists; (3) to provide 
religious services by preaching and establishing churches in sec- 
tions where there are no Baptist churches or preaching, and 
thus give the people the gospel 

Baptists owe it to the industrial towns springing up like magic 



18 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



all over our State, and to the increasing mill population every- 
where, to organize churches and thus hold the thousands who 
are flocking to them; and the churches, weakened by removals, 
will some day grow strong when the tide turns again home- I 
ward. I 

The great territory between the Roanoke and Cape Pear Rivers 
east of the W. & W. Railroad comprises one fifth of the State. 
Yet there are whole counties where the Baptists are almost 
without churches or people. What is true of this section as to 
Baptists, is largely true of the State as to Christians. Our 
able, efficient and beloved Secretary has been greatly blessed in | 
administering the affairs of the State Mission Board and many i 
able and consecrated men and women assisting him, yet we are 
told there are over 600,000 adults in our Commonwealth who are 
not Christians. ♦ 

Some things we may do: 

1. We can inform ourselves on State Missions. Brother Liv- 
ingston Johnson's little book, "Christian Statesmanship", will I 
inform and inspire the reader or the Mission Study Class. j| 

2. We can talk to our people more about the State Mis-H 
sion program — and the Biblical Recorder will keep us informedJH 

3. We can pray and work to save our own people, and giveH^ 
more money to meet the destitution in North Carolina. V 

Respectfully submitted, H 

C. L. DOWELL, ■ 
J. H. MATTHEWS. M 

C. L. Dowell and Livingston Johnson spoke to the report. W 

Vote of Thanks to Livingston Johnson for His Work as Secre-. 
tary of State Mission Board. 

In view of the fact that our Secretary of the Board of Mis- 
sions and Sunday Schools, Dr. Livingston Johnson, is soon to re- 
tire from this position, to take up the work of the active pas- 
torate; and because we, the West Chowan Association, do 
deeply regret to lose him as our leader; and feeling it a loss 
so difficult for us to sustain, we feel in our hearts the impelling 
desiie to express to Dr. Johnson our deep and abiding confidence 
in him as a safe and sane leader; also our love for him as a 
fellow-laborer in bringing in the Kingdom of God; therefore be 
it resolved — , 

That this body by a rising vote assure him that he has by 
his untiring efforts and congenial fellowship greatly endeared 
himself to us, and that our prayers shall follow him in his 
life's work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. P. HARRIS, 

G. E. LINEBERRY. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 19 



The following cgnstitute what is known as the committee 
on apportionment : J. H. Matthews, J. F. Cale, P. J. Long, R. 
B. Lineberry, S. P. Winborne, and M. P. Davis. 

The Association then adjourned, with the benediction by 
Livingston Johnson. 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The Association reconvened at one o'clock, and after a 
song service and prayer by D. Cale, heard the Report on 
Home Missions read by H. H. Honeycutt. 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

The threescore and ten years, to the credit of the Ho,me Mis- 
sion Board have, with the exception of the few following 18 61, 
been years of progress. 

The twelve departments of work claiming our attention are 
here referred to under ten heads. 

1. The Mountain School Department, comprising thirty-six 
schools, has about $750,000.00 worth of property and serves 
over 5,500 students, a larger per cent of whom are Christians 
than in any other schools in the South. 

The department's special evangelist. Rev. J. C. Owen, of Ashe- 
ville, reports for the past year an increase of ten ministerial 
students; a gain over last year of ninety-four baptisms and 
$32,653.00 worth of new property. 

2. Evangelism — No other such denominational work is known 
as that done by the Home Board evangelistic staff. A force of 
twenty-five white evangelists, including six singers, reported for 
last year 12,637 baptisms, 17.057 accessions, an average gain of 
over thirty-three and one-third per cent. In six different cities 
there have been over 1,200 additions. The 1,301 young men and 
women volunteering for the ministry or for missionary work is 
a singularly important contribution to our city problem. 

3. Co-operative mission work was done last year in four- 
teen States, resulting in 21,067 baptisms. 

4. Cuba, Mexico, and the Canal Zone. 

On account of the Mexican war situation no accurate report 
can be made of the work there. Some workers remained de- 
spite all dangers and they were more amply repaid than ever 
before. The increasing openness of these stricken people and 
readiness to be freed from papal superstitions is a ceaseless and 
urgent appeal to us. 

In Cuba, with two new workers given last year, twenty-six 
preaching stations were manned; 165,400 pages of tracts and 
1,485 Bibles distributed; 168 persons baptized. The total mem- 
bership is now 1,962. Contributions aggregated to $4,875.19. 
This growing effort toward self-support merits our heartiest 
commendation, both of the Board and of the workers. Their 



20 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



educational interests are served by the Cuban-American College 
and by six other schools. 

In the Canal Zone, though many changes were necessitated, 
more than one hundred were baptized into the membership of 
the eight churches; and all of them contributed. The Chorrilla 
Church (ool.), giving $682.18. 

5. The Publicity Department is rendering increasingly val- 
uable service through the Home Field, our monthly missionary 
magazine; an issue of 5,500.000 pages of tracts; legular con- 
tributions to twenty or more denominational papers; a splendid 
supply of mission study books; a Home Mission album; Home 
Mission charts; and twenty Home Mission slide lectures. 

6. Negroes — The Southerner has been the negroe's chief bene- 
factor for many years; but the need of more organized aid has 
been increasingly felt, until last year two negro evangelists, 
working in the simultaneous campaigns with the regular staff, 
received 4,000 for baptism. Thirty-nine co-operative mission- 
aries reported 3,446 for baptism and 1,763 other accessions. 
Endorsement of the theological seminary was made by the 
Convention two years ago, and later plans were inaugurated to 
help the National Baptist Convention finance the same. 

7. Indians — of the 125,000 Oklahoma Indians, work is being 
done among the two wild tribes, known as the Blanket Indians. 
The work of the seven independent missionaries has been at- 
tended with marked success, nearly all chiefs and influential 
members of the Pawnees tribe being now members of churches. 

Among the Osages, the smaller tribe, the work manned by 
two missionary preachers, a woman worker, and an interpreter, 
slow progress has been made because of the consolidation of old 
superstitions through Catholic missions simply grafted on. 

This certainly emphasizes the need of haste among them all, 
among the 22,000 in New Mexico, and among all other of these 
Indians. 

8. The immigrant problem is one of keen interest just now. No 
other agencies contribute so much to its solution as those propa- 
gating a pure Christianity. 

We get annually 1,000,000 immigrants, over two-thirds of 
them Catholics, many more Pagan or atheists. Southern Bap- 
tists are answering the needs of their 4,000,000 with only 
fifty workers, or a worker to each 80,000 of them; and their 
southward drift increases. 

Our greater opportunity and obligation is clear when it is seen 
that every letter back to the homeland is a foreign missionary 
activity of incalculable worth; frequently Bibles go thus to 
Catholic lands and other lands of closed Bibles, and finally that 
every consecrated Christian of the 200,000 to 300,000 annually 
returning is an unpaid missionary of the most promising type. 

9. Enlistment — Dr. Cree's resignation left the vacant secre- 
taryship of this department, but the work goes on. It is called 
for by 18,000 country churches having only once a month preach- 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 21 



ing, irregular and non-resident pastors. The enlistment work- 
ers are therefore the servants of every Board and every agency 
of Southern Baptists, including many local pastors and chuiches. 
Last year's efforts show an average gain of over fifty per cent 
for all churches served; 400 or 500 per cent gain in a few. 

Notable endorsements have been recently published from our 
State Secretaries and others; Dr. Livingston Johnson, among 
others, declaring it the most important work Southern Baptists 
have to do. 

Church Building — Southern Methodists have expended nearly 
$5,000,000.00 in Church Extension, and now regularly apportion 
ten per cent of their missionary assessments to church building. 
The Disciples, a small body as compared to Southern Baptists, 
have expended $2,815,000.00 since 1888; have now a cash capital 
of $1,115,000.00, and are working on the second million. 

Slow as we have been to meet them, Southern Baptists have 
larger demands than any other denomination. The very suc- 
cess of our evangelism has produced them, yet we have only 
$122,536.00 with which to answer the calls of 8,000 needy 
churches, nearly 4,000 of them homeless. 

Bishop H. C. Moriison says, "Every dollar that goes into this 

treasury becomes imperishable If you would make your 

money immortal, cast it here. It will work on and on after 
you have ceased to work, and will come to you with exceeding in- 
crease in eternity." 

Surely we Southern Baptists shall have the first $1,000,000.00 
Church Building Loan Fund at the earliest moment possible. 
Maivelous as our successes have been, two-thirds of the people 
of the South make no profession of religion, over 22,000,000 
unsaved, or 4,000,000 more than the total population in 1880. 

As forty per cent of professing Christians in the South are 
Baptists, at least forty per cent of the burden of responsi- 
bility is ours. One has but to refer to our church building ex- 
penditures for proof that this responsibility is not being fully 
met. Clearly it will not be met until our Baptist constituency 
is better informed and enlisted; we therefore recommend— 

1. Larger general use of Home Mission tracts. 

2. Mission study classes, .wherever possible, for both men and 
young people, as well as for women. 

3. That clubs of subscribers for "The Home Field and the Bib- 
lical Recorder" be gathered in all churches. 

4. That prayer be made frequently in our churches for the 
whole Southland. 

5. That an eveiy-member canvass, or assessment be made in 
each church for, at least, this one object, and that every church 
increase its Home Mission contribution during the ensuing year 
by ten per cent or more. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. H. HONEYCUTT, For the Committee. 



22 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



K. D. Stukenbrok presented the Report on Foreign Mis- 
sions. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

In presenting our report this year, we wish to say first that the 
great opportunities spoken of in last year's report have in- 
creased rather than diminished. The number baptized on the 
foreign field this year is about the same as last year. 

But it seems to us that we Baptists have been very slow in lay- 
ing hold on these opportunities before us. Although we have 
been sending out new missionaries, in spite of the enormous 
debt hanging on our Board, yet we must remember that this does 
not mean an increase of forces, for we have been simply re- 
placing what we have lost by death or ill health. A little 
study of the situation might be helpful to show up some of our 
mistaken ideas and make us think and pray right. 

Africa in twenty years has added but two to her force of 
missionaries which at the present day numbers only seven. Its 
immediate and pressing need is for nine more. 

Argentina in five years has had an increase of but one. In 
this country eight missionaries are trying to reach twelve mil- 
lion people. One of these brave workers founded twelve churches 
with one thousand and four members. 

Brazil in five years has increased her force by only six. One 
missionary serves approximately one million people. 

In China throughout six provinces there is a proportion of 
but one missionary to every two and a half millions. Twel3i/'e 
provinces have no missionaries. 

Now, with such a showing as this, can we Baptists afford to 
boast about our missionary activities? 

If the missionaries are willing to give their lives for these 
lost billions, should we not at least be willing to give our money? 
At the present day there are over seventy consecrated and well 
trained young men and women pleading to go. Does this not 
appeal to us? 

"But you say", shall we in the face of such facts continue t 
pray the Father to send laborers into the vineyard? Yes, we dar 
not disobey the command to pray thus. But very earnestly an 
sincerely must we pray that God will open our hearts to give 
not only liberally, but with sacrifice. And may the answer t 
this second prayer be found first in you and me. 

How may we promote the art of giving? Let us note a 
few suggestions. 

First, by giving systematically. 

Second, by studying and passing on literature generously pro- 
vided by our Foreign Mission Board at Richmond, Va. 

Third, by organizing and carrying on Mission Study Classes, a 
most beneficial way of helping missions. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



23 



And lastly, in two brief weighty words, "Talk Missions." 
Respectfully submitted, 

K. D. STUKENBROK. 

These reports were discussed by K. D. Stukenbrok, Jesse 
Blalock, and were adopted. 

R. P. Thomas read the Treasurer's Report. 

TREASURER'S REPORT. 

October 29, 1914, to balance on hand $ 1.66 

October 29, 1915, to amount received from Finance Com. 108.23 



Total $ 109.89 

CR. 

December 9, 1914, by amount paid N. W. Britton for 

services as Clerk 35.00 

December 22, 1914, by amount paid Nash Brothers for 

printing minutes of Association 70.00 



Total $ 105.00 

October 6, 1915, balance due West Chowan Association . . 4.89 

Total $109.89 

Respectfully submitted. 

R. P. THOMAS, Treasurer. 

I 

"W. H. Mitchell presented the Finance Committee's Re- 
port, which was adopted. 

A vote of thanks was extended to the Jackson Church 
and the other churches of the town and the entire com- 
munity for their unbounded hospitality during this session 
of the Association. 

A special prayer was offered in behalf of C. W. Scar- 
borough, who could not attend this session on account of the 
sickness of his wife. 

R. B. Lineberry read the Report on Apportionment, whicb 
was adopted. 



24 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



APPORTIONMENT FOR 1915-1916. 

o o .2 ^ .2 2 
Churches a g g .5 5 ^ S 



is 5 o s ^ 

02 ffi O O 



Ahoskie 


$170 


$150 


$190 


$10 


$200 


$40 


$20 


$780 


Aulander 


175 


150 


200 


10 


200 


40 


20 


795 


Ashley's Giove ...... 


50 


20 


30 


1 


50 


5 


2 


158 


Askewville 


30 


20 


30 


1 


30 


6 


5 


122 


Bethlehem 


60 


35 


60 


2 


50 


20 


5 


232 


Bethany 


30 


25 


45 


1 


15 


5 


10 


131 


Brantley's Grove . . . . 


35 


30 


40 


1 


15 


2 


2 


125 


Buckhorn 


220 


100 


180 


5 


230 


25 


15 


775 


Capehart's 


40 


25 


35 


1 


20 


5 


5 


131 


Cashie 


125 


100 


125 


5 


250 


25 


10 


640 


Center Grove 


40 


20 


40 


1 


60 


10 


5 


176 




150 


. 130 


140 


5 


225 


35 


10 


695 


Christian Harbor . . . . 


40 


30 


40 


1 


60 


7 


5 


183 


Colerain 


110 


70 


110 


3 


160 


15 


12 


480 


Connaritsa 


45 


37 


50 


3 


70 


10 


5 


220 


Creeksville 


10 


5 


10 


1 


25 


5 


3 


59 


Conway 


75' 


50 


75 


5 


100 


10 


2 


317 


Elam 


30 


20 


30 


1 


150 


7 


3 


241 


Galatia 


30 


20 


30 


5 


20 


5 


2 


112 


Green's Cross Roads 


35 


25 


35 


1 


15 


5 


2 


118 


Harrellsville 


40 


25 


40 


2 


70 


7 


5 


189 


Hebron 


30 


20 


30 


1 


25 


6 


4 


116 


Hillside 


10 


5 


10 


1 


5 


3 


2 


36 


Holly Grove 


40 


35 


50 


1 


60 


5 


5 


196 


Holly Springs 


15 


8 


15 


1 


10 


5 


1 


55 


Horton's ... 


12 


9 


12 


1 


12 


3 


1 


50 


Jackson 


50 


35 


50 


4 


100 


10 


5 


254 


Kelford 


45 


30 


45 


1 


60 


10 


5 


196 


Lasker 


25 


15 


25 


1 


30 


5 


3 


104 


Lawrence 


35 


20 


35 


1 


30 


5 


3 


129 




80 


60 


90 


1 


60 


10 


10 


311 


Margarettsville .... 


15 


10 


15 


1 


20 


5 


4 


70 


Mars Hill 


125 


50 


100 


2 


175 


15 


5 


472 




50 


40 


50 


2 


50 


10 


5 


207 


Mt. Carmel 


35 


25 


40 


5 


30 


5 


5 


145 


Murfreesboro 


125 


75 


125 


10 


105 


20 


3 


463 


Mt. Tabor 


190 


150 


190 


2 


200 


30 


4 


766 




. 40 


25 


70 


2 


60 


10 


5 


212 


Merry Hill 


20 


10 


20 


1 


30 


5 


4 


90 




25 


15 


20 


1 


25 


6 


3 


95 




5 


3 


5 


1 


5 


2 


1 


22 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 2 5 





, . 60 


40 


60 


1 


100 


10 


5 


276 


Pleasant Grove . . 


. . . 40 


30 


40 


1 


35 


10 


5 


161 


Powellsville . . . . . 


70 


50 


70 


2 


60 


3 


2 


257 


Republican 


50 


30 


60 


5 


100 


10 


5 


260 


Rich Square 


110 


80 


110 


7 


150 


10 


5 


472 




15 


10 


15 


1 


15 


2 


1 


59 


Robert's Chapel . 


. . . 200 


150 


200 


5 


200 


25 


6 


786 


Ross' 


75 


50 


75 


2 


60 


10 


5 


277 




10 


5 


10 


3 


10 


2 


2 


42 


Sandy Run 


60 


40 


60 


2 


60 


10 


5 


237 


Seaboard 


30 


20 


30 


2 


30 


8 


5 


125 




5 


3 


5 


1 


5 


2 


1 


22 




100 


70 


100 


5 


150 


15 


10 


450 




o c 


15 




i 


6 U 







± U D 




, , 70 


50 


70 


2 


75 


15 


5 


287 


Winton 


70 


50 


70 


2 


50 


3 


2 


247 




, , 70 


55 


70 


3 


60 


7 


4 


269 


Total 


. . 3572 


2475 


3602 


150 


4297 


607 


298 


15001 



T. C. Keaton read the Report on Woman's Work, which 
was spoken to briefly by J. S. Farmer, and was adopted. 

REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK. 

Among all the achievements of the last seventy-five years, 
none is perhaps more conspicuous than what we may call the 
planting, growth and development of Woman's Work. • Eighty 
years ago David Abeel returning from China, planted a little 
seed in the hearts of the women of Britian, when he told them 
the story of the women of the far East, who shut in zenanas, 
harems and seraglios, were inaccessible to all holy influences un- 
less their own sex could be induced to undertake the work in 
their behalf. That little seed germinated and the women find- 
ing that their needle work would unlock the doors of these 
zenanas, began to plan for the emancipation of their sisters 
in heathen darkness, and it was through the influence of Mrs. 
Ellen B. Mason, wife of a Baptist missionary from Burmah, that ^ 
tlie first Woman's Missionary Society was organized in Boston, 
! in 1860. This Society was undenominational, but it led to the 
organizing of the various denominational Women's Societies now 
connected with all the great Protestant denominations. It was 
not, however, until 1888, during the meeting of the Southern 
Baptist Convention, in Richmond, that the W. M. U. of the 
Southern Baptist Convention was organized. From that time, 
notwithstanding the opposition of the Convention, the Union has 
had a prodigious growth. The women of our own State Con- 
vention reported at New Bern about one thousand and seventy- 
two Societies and $42,548,86 contributed to the objects of the 
Convention. 



26 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



The woman's work of the Southern Baptist Convention is di- 
vided into five branches, viz.: The Woman's Missionary Society, 
the Young Woman's Auxiliary, the Girls' Auxiliary, the Royal 
Ambassadors and the Sunbeams. These Societies are not only 
teaching the world system in carrying on the Lord's work, but 
through more than fifteen hundred mission study classes, they 
are inculcating and spreading the spirit and doctrine of mis- 
sions throughout the land. And when we remember that the in- 
fluences, going out from the Societies, reach and make its im- 
pression upon the child life, the very heart of the Convention, 
it is impossible to estimate the extent, the importance and the 
force of woman's work in the Southland. Considering the com- 
paratively recent history of our woman's organization, and the 
prejudices against the work of women in the past and which 
still obtains in many sections, the origin and growth of woman's 
work, characterizes it as one of the most remarkable factors in 
the growth of the Kingdom of God on earth. 

We would recommend that the members and especially the 
pastors of our churches, in every way possible, encourage the 
women and co-operate with them in the great work of evangeliz- 
ing the world. 

S. N. WATSON, For the Committee. 

HISTORIAN'S REPORT. 
Buildings. 

Mars Hill has completed a large and comfortable house for 
pastor's home. Buckhorne people are elevating and remodelling 
their house of worship so that it will be practically a new house 
and have three new Sunday School rooms with other advantages 
and comfort. Colerain Church has been painted this year. 
Jackson Church is arranging for a pastor's home. 

Pastoral Changes. 

Lewiston and Republican churches have formed a field with 
twice a month preaching each and have as pastor Rev. T. L. 
Brown. Rev. J. F. Cale is now pastor of Holly Grove. We 
were sorry to lose from our Association Rev. W. B. Waff, who 
has taken a field of churches in the Sandy Creek Association. 
We were fortunate in securing Rev. Jesse Blalock for Brother 
Waff's field at Severn and Conway. Rev. T. C. Keaton is now 
pastor of Murfreesboro Church. 

Necrology. 

Lasker Church sustained a great loss in the death of Dr. T. G. 
Whims. He was a deacon and well beloved by all who knew 
him — truly, like Luke of old, a beloved physician. This church 
also loses in the death of William Lassiter, a young man of 
sterling worth, known and felt in his church for his kindness and 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



27 



liberality. They have lost greatly also in the death of Mrs. 
Gabriel Morris, who although past the threescore and ten was 
still full of faith and cheerful till her death. 

Potecasi loses in the death of Brother E. B. Lassiter, one of 
her strongest members in every way, full of kindness and liber- 
ality. His death is felt not only by his church, but by the 
entire community and county and State. This church loses much 
in the death of Sister Eunice Futrell, who was a most ex- 
cellent and useful Christian young woman. Creeksville Church 
also realized a loss in the death of this good woman. Potecasi 
loses, too, in the death of Brother J. F. Woodard, who for 
twenty-five years or more, had lived a straightforward Christian 
life, a neighborly, law-abiding, Christian gentleman. Galatia 
Church loses, in the death of John Davis, one of her strongest 
members in every way, known and loved for his kindness and 
devout Christian walk. His wife who died just a few months 
previous, was a kind and affectionate mother, wife and neigh- 
bor and withal a devout Christian. 

Ross' Church lost heavily in the death of deacon Jiles P. 
Mizelle. Faithful in his church and useful in the community 
and county. This church also lost three old brethren — Wil- 
liam Bond, Joseph Williford, and W. T. Wilson, and two young 
men — Ernest P. White and D. Clifton White — two brothers, 
who were buried the same day. The following sisters of the church 
died this year — Penarita Hoggard, Dicey E. Jernigan, and Bet- 
tie Bryant. 

A very sad death to Christian Harbor was that of Mrs. Lillie 
Holloman, a young woman loved by all and devoted to her 
church. 

Colerain Church lost one of her truest members in the death 
of Brother Frank Pearce. This church also lost, by death. 
Brethren J. D. Perry, David Burch, A. C. Peele, and his wife 
and young Brother Willie Baker. 

Mt. Carmel Church loses heavily in the death of Brother G. E. 
Hasty, the senior deacon, also in the deaths of Brethren E. W. 
Woodruff and George Parks. 

Chowan Church has lost heavily in the death of W. P. Taylor, 
a man well known for his liberality, not only to every part of 
his church work and the Lord's cause generally, but for his help- 
fulness to the needy, and his aid in every good cause in the 
community, county, and State. Surely he was a man willing 
to do his part of the world's work. He was one of the most 
influential laymen in the West Chowan Association. His de- 
pendable judgment and inestimable value in outlining policies 
and putting them into execution meaning much to the Association 
and other Baptist gatherings, being really a leader of men. 

Mrs. H. B. Vann, another very estimable member of the Chowan 
Church, died the past year. She was a woman of unusual in- 
tellectual ability, a good neighbor, and a kind mother, and will 
be greatly missed in her church and community. 



28 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



Our whole Association suffers a distinct loss in the death of 
Brother J. T. Williams of the Harrellsville Church. From his 
life, wherever he went there ladiated sunshine and geniality that 
made for him a large circle of strong and admiring friends. 
He was born in 1851 and died July 2 9, 1915. He was a son 
of the late Rev. B. B. Williams, well and favorably known as 
a Baptist minister in this and adjoining Associations. From the 
father there was a rich legacy of native ability, pleasing disposi- 
tion and sturdy character. Brother Williams being about ten 
years old at the beginning of the Civil War, did not get much 
school advantage, but his native ability was well trained and 
under happy control, so that he became a useful citizen, trusted 
and honored by his fellowmen. With credit to himself and satis- 
faction to his fellow citizens, he served them for several years as 
a member of the county board of education of his county, and 
i'or one term as member of the State Legislature, He was a 
devout Christian and loyal Baptist and as such enjoyed the 
respect and confidence of his brethren in the church. For some 
time he had been a trustee of Chowan College, and for this 
institution he proved his loyalty in word and deed. 

His home life was indeed admirable. He lived on a farm near 
Harrellsville. His productive farm and beautiful home bor 
testimony to his well trained native ability, his industry and 
good taste and his progressive spirit. Those who had the privi 
lege of the hospitality of this home came away feeling that they 
had been in a happy home. Perhaps the finest tribute to th 
well-poised judgment and kindness of heart of this most ex 
cellent man and his noble wife is found in the lives of his 
five cultured and genial daughters. 

He was sick for quite a while, but endured it with beautiful 
patience and resignation. It was truly pleasant to hear him 
speak of his sufferings — he did so with such fine spirit of resig 
nation and so calmly awaited the will of the Lord, who, he said, 
had been so very kind to him. 

Jackson Church. 

Late in the seventies or probably 1880, Rev. Joshua Fleet- 
wood came to the town of Jackson and preached in the court 
house for several days, holding meetings and prayers with the 
people and creating some enthusiasm. Later came Rev. Vernon 
I'Anson, in his young manhood, and held meetings in the court 
house. He succeeded in getting the people interested in building 
a church. Thus the pioneer work was started and the building 
was begun, but before the frame of the building was fully raised 
a storm came and blew it down. The building was at once 
begun again and pushed forward till it was enclosed and some 
temporary benches secured. Rev. John Mitchell came and 
preached in this hull of a house. He, with Rev. J. J. Rochelle, 
organized a church in 1882, with less than a dozen members, 
there being only four male members — two of these were elected 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 2 9 



and ordained deacons, one of them clerk, and one sexton. The 
first pastor was Rev. John Mitchell. Other pastors have been 
Revs. R. T. Vann, C. W. Scarborough, T. G. Wood, A. Cree, C. 
E. Gower, E. Z. Eure, R. D. Cross, J. R. Taylor, L. A. Paiker, 
Paul Bowers and K. D. Stukenbrok, who is the present pas- 
tor. In the past few years $2,000 has been spent in remodelling 
the church building, which is now free of debt. The church has 
also bought a parsonage for the pastor. 



Last Convention year we raised in the State $5,008.52 for the 
aged and the afflicted ministers and widows of ministers. One- 
third is set aside for permanent endowment fund and two- 
thirds used. Twice this amount would be too little for us to 
raise for those who have given their lives to lead us and our 
loved ones to Christ and to develop us in the Master's service. 

It is fitting that the companions of these, who have often 
made the greater saciiflce, when left helpless and alone should 
be aided. We urge our churches to greatly increase their regu- 
lar contributions to this object and also make a special offering 
on the regular preaching day near Christmas. 



R. B. LINEBERRY. 



REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF. 



J. H. MATTHEWS, 

B. S. GAY, 

G. E. LINEBERRY. 



DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS. 



Received. 
By baptism . . 
By letter . . . . 
By restoration 



434 
316 
84 



834 



Loss. 

By letter . . 
By exclusion 
By death . . 



375 
164 
119 



658 



Gain 

Total membership 

Expenses for Home Purposes. 

Pastors' salaries 

Buildings and repairs . . . . . 

Poor 

Incidentals 

Sunday School expenses . . . 
Minute fund 



$ 18,030.00 



2,180.45 
783.75 
3,229.58 
1,930.14 
110.30 



176 
12,708 



Total 



$ 26,264.22 



30 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



Contributions. 

Associational Missions $ 167.46 

State Missions 3,281.12 

Home Missions 2,451.91 

Foreign Missions 3,580.70 

Sunday School Missions 115.91 

Orphanage 4,301.44 

Ministerial Education 568.22 

Ministers' Relief 268.45 

Colleges and schools 1,331.13 

Other objects 5,816.51 



Total $ 21,882.85 



Grand Total $ 48,147.07 

Number of Churches Contributing to the Different objects. 

State Missions 56 

Home Missions 55 

Foreign Missions 57 

Sunday School Missions 13 

Orphanage 54 

Ministerial Education 49 

Ministerial Relief 43 



The following delegates were elected: L. E. Dailey, to 
the Southern Baptist Convention; C. G. Powell, N. W. Brit- 
ton, T. C. Keaton, to the Baptist State Convention. 

J. F. Cale was elected a member of the State Mission 
Board ; C. L. Dowell, Vice-President of the Foreign Mis- 
sion Board ; C. W. Scarborough, Vice-President of the Home 
Mission Board. 

After a most harmonious session, the Association ad- 
journed with prayer by C. L. Dowell. 

C. H. JENKINS, Moderator. 

N. W. BRITTON, Clerk. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 31 



MINUTES OF THE WEST CHOWAN W. M. U. 
Morning Session. 

The Annual Session of the Woman's Missionary Union of the 
West Chowan Association met with the Cashie Baptist Church, 
Windsor, N. C, on July 28, 1915. 

The morning session was opened by singing "All Hail the 
Power of Jesus' Name", after which the devotional exercises 
were conducted by Miss Myrtle Myers, of Holly Grove. Then 
we were cordially welcomed by Mrs. L. F. Pierce, of the Baptist 
Church; Mrs. M. B. Gilliam, of the Methodist Church; Mrs. 
G. L. Mardra, of the Episcopal Church. Mrs. E. A. Huggins, of 
Rich Square, responded with a gracious message. 

As Mrs. Herbert Jenkins, of Aulander, was not well enough 
to be present and act as secretary, Mrs. M. D. Curtis was elected 
to take her place for the day. 

Miss Willie Lambertson, President of the Union, gave us a 
brief sketch of the year's work reporting fourteen Woman's Mis- 
sionary Societies organized, three Girls' Auxiliaries, eleven 
young Woman's Auxiliaries and three Royal Ambassadors. 

There being no old business we proceeded to new business of 
the day. Mrs. Freeman urged all Societies to express themselves 
about sending Miss Middleton to the foreign field. Miss Lam- 
bertson explained why Miss Goodwin was unable to go and said 
that Miss Middleton was to take her place. Mrs. W. N. Jones said 
a few words about Miss Middleton. Those taking part in the 
discussion were: Mrs. Stukenbrok, Mrs. C. G. Powell, Miss Bessie 
Taylor, Mrs. John Freeman, Mrs. Revel, and Mrs. E. L. Gatling. 
The following visitors were recognized — Mrs. W. N. Jones, of 
Raleigh, Miss Minnie Middleton, of Warsaw, and Mrs. Haight, 
Vice-President of the Chowan Association. Miss Lambertson 
then asked, "Whom shall we send to the foreign field?" Mrs. 
Jones had suggested Miss Middleton, but as her support has 
been arranged for some other way, she urged us to support 
Miss Pearle Johnson, who is planning to go on the foreign field 
in October. A motion was made and carried that we adopt Miss 
Pearl Johnson as our missionary and support her at least one 
year and as much longer as possible. We then sang "At the 
Feet of Jesus." 

The Young Peoples' work was taken up just here and Miss 
Middleton addressed us on "The Appeal of the Eastern Women 
to the Western." 

A conference of Young People's work was conducted by Mrs. 
S. N. Watson, of Winton. The following subjects were dis- 
cussed: 

"What it Has Meant to Me to be a Sunbeam," by Eloise 
Bridger. . * 

"What it Has Meant to me to be a Y. W. A.," by Miss Ruth 
Davenport, who was unable to be present, so Mrs. Freeman 
read her paper. Talks were made by Miss Nannie Newsome 



32 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



and Mrs. R. B. Lineberry, who expressed an interest in Y. W. A. 
work. Mission study was suggested as an interesting feature. 

"Why I Think all Boys Should Be Royal Ambassadors," by Mrs. 
C. G. Powell, of Ahoskie. 

Miss Elizabeth Pritchard, of Aulander, gave a talk on "How 
to Interest Sunbeams." 

"What Attitude Should the W. M. U. Have Toward the Junior 
Bands?" by Mrs. Deans Harrell. 

Several helpful talks were made by different members of 
the Union. "Why Train a Child in Missions?" by Mrs. M. D. 
Curtis. 

"Why Some Y. W. A's. fail?" — An open discussion led by Mrs. 
' S. N, Watson. We were shown that we need trained leaders 
who should study individual talents. 

The following commitees were appointed: Time and Place, 
Nominating, Obituary, and Resolutions. 

The Union then adjourned for dinner. 

Afternoon Session. 

The afternoon session was opened by singing "I Love to 
Tell the Story." Devotional exercises were conducted by Mrs. 
Verona Hoggard. Minutes of the last meeting were read and 
approved. The report of the Secretary-Treasuier, Mrs. Herbert 
Jenkins, was read. 

Mrs. W. N. Jones gave us an address on "Mountain Top 
Visions", using for a basis the four memorable peaks of the 
Bible — Mt. Sinai, Mt. Hatton, the Mt. of Golgotha, where Jesus 
gave up His life that we might be saved, and where He left u^ 
messages of love fiom the cross. He asks that we give Him 
our heart's best love and our entire selves. Then He came to 
the little Mt. of Galilee, forty days after the cross. He told 
the women to tell them He would meet them there. Mrs. Jones 
urged us to do the work that lies nearest at hand. 

"Personal Service in a Country Neighborhood" was inter- 
estingly discussed by Mrs. R. B. Lineberry, of Coleraine. We 
then sang a hymn — -"Amazing Grace." 

"Are Mission Study Classes Worth While?" as told by Mrs. 
Green Gay, made us realize that we, as women of Baptist Mis- 
sionary Societies, owe it to our cause and to God to know through 
study of the great mission work. 

Miss Johnson, our adopted missionary, gave us a splendid 
talk on the Training School, after which Mrs. Stukenbrok added 
a personal touch to Training School life. 

The last talk on the program — "Woman's Part in State Mis- 
sions" — was given by Mrs. C. H. Griffin. 

The Committee on Time and Place made the following re- 
port: The Committee recommends that we meet with the Society 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 33 



of Meherrin Baptist Church for our annual meeting the last 
Wednesday in July, 1916. 
The report was adopted. 

MRS. C. G. PARKER, 

Chairman. 
MRS. D. L. MYERS, 
MISS ELSIE EARLY. 

Committee on Nomination made the following report: 
President, Miss Willie Lambertson. 
Vice-President, Mrs. E. L. Gatling. 
Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Herbert Jenkins. 
Superintendent of Junior Work, Mrs. John Freeman. 
Committee. 

The report was adopted. 

The Committee on Obituaries made the following report: 

Whereas God, in His great wisdom and mercy, has seen fit 
to take from among us the following faithful and useful members: 

Mrs. Jesse White, Askewville. 

Mrs. Freezie Todd, Holly Grove. 

Mrs. Albeit Vann, Rich Square. 

Mrs. Virginia Futrell, Rich Square. 

Mrs. Henry Vann, Chowan Church, Winton. 

Mrs. T. Gilliam, Cashie, Windsor, 
we, the ladies of the Woman's Missionary Societies of the West 
Chowan Association, beg to submit the following resolutions: 

(1) That in the death of these, our sisters, we have suffered a 
great loss. 

(2) That we submit to the will of God and realize in their 
death we are drawn closer to the Savior. 

(3) That while we, as a Union, sorely miss them the loss is 
even greater to the individual Societies in which they worked. 

May these Societies gain inspiration for greater service from 
the lives of our deceased sisters. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. C. H. GRIFFIN, 

Chairman, 
MRS. W. G. WHITE, 
MRS. MAJETTE. 

The report was adopted. 

Mrs. C. G. Parker made a motion to send Miss Heck a mes- 
sage from the Union. The Secretary sent the following message: 
Love and greetings from the women of the West Chowan Asso- 
ciation — Phil 4:7. 

Miss Pearl Johnson dismissed the meeting with prayer. Just 
before the afternoon session closed, the doors of the class- 
rooms were thrown back and Mrs. John Freeman presented a 
shower from the Union to Miss Middleton, who showed great 
surprise and thanked the Union very cordially. 



34 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



Evening Session. 

At the evening session the congregation stood and joined 
heartily in singing an opening hymn, after which Rev. D. P. 
Harris, of Windsor, conducted the devotional exercises. When 
some special music had been enjoyed the congregation sang 
"How Firm a Foundation", then Dr. John Jeter Hurt, of Dur- 
ham, delivered a most excellent address — a collection was taken 
— hymn — "I Would Love Thee" was sung. 

The Committee on Resolutions made their splendid report, 
which was adopted. Then the benediction was pronounced. 

MISS WILLIE LAMBERTSON, 

President. 

MRS. M. D. CURTIS, 

Secretary Protem. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 
OF THE WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 

The women who comprise the Woman's Missionary Union of 
the West Chowan Association feel that God has showered many 
blessings upon their labors the past year. Though financial de- 
pression has been evident everywhere, still the past year has 
been the best, so far as finances are concerned, in the history of 
our* Union. Never before have our women been so ready to 
sacrifice that God's work might prosper and His Kingdom be 
established on earth as in heaven. 

We have enrolled forty-nine Woman's Missionary Societies, 
eleven Young Woman's Auxiliaries, three Girls Auxiliaries, 
thirty-nine Sunbeam Bands, and six Royal Ambassador Chapters 
— making a total of 108 missionary societies in this Association. 

There yet remain nine churches without any missionary or- 
ganization. To the pastors of these churches I would plead espe- 
cially — will you not further the cause of your Master and en- 
courage the women in behalf of missions? They are largely 
dependent upon you for encouragement and information. 

Last year we gave for all objects $3,241.98. Our aim for 
the coming year is $3,350.00, but ,we believe God will even 
lead us beyond this. 

Our Union is divided into three well organized county Unions 
and meetings are held regularly each quarter. The special ob- 
ject before us this year is the support of a missionary on the 
foreign field. Miss Pearl Johnson, a graduate of the Louis- 
ville Training School, has been appointed by the Foreign Mis- 
sion Board and chosen as "our missionary" and will sail in a 
short time for China. Already the $600 necessary for her sup- 
port, has been pledged and part paid to our Treasurer. 

Will you not pray for this dear lady, who has heeded the 
call of the Master, and who will give her life to far away China? 
We need your prayers and co-operation. Our work is not sep- 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 35 



arate and apart from yours, but only one of the links to make 
the chain complete in hastening the coming of His Kingdom. 

God has favored our work in many ways, and we know that 
His smile of approval rests upon it — therefore we beg that you 
the pastors of this Association, lend us a helping hand, and 
whenever it is possible, help to enlist the women under the 
missionary banner. 




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1 



MINUTES 



THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 



OF THE 



WES' 



TIST 




HHLD WITH 



WISTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
BERTIE COUNTY 

OCTOBER 3d and 4th. 1916 



;ion will be held with Ahoskie Church, Hertford County, 
n Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October, 1917. 
To preach the sermon, T. C. Keaton ; 
Alternate:, W. R. Haight. 



RALEICH, N. C, : 
Ml'tual Publishing Company. Printers 
1916 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

WEST CHOWAN 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



HELD WITH 



LEWISTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
BERTIE COUNTY 

OCTOBER 3d and 4th. 1916 



The next session will be held with Ahoskie Church, Hertford County 
begmnmg on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October, 1917 
To preach the sermon, T. C. Keaton; 
Alternate, W. R. Haight. 



RALEIGH, N. C: 
Mutual Publishing Company, Printers 
1916 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS. 



Dancy Cale Potecasi, N. C. 

C. L. Dowell Ahoskie, N. C. 

S. B. Barnes Merry Hill, N. C. 

C. W. Scarborough Murfreesboro, N. C. 

T. T. Speight Windsor, N. C. 

R. T. White Conway, N. C. 

J. R. Mathews Aulander, N. C. 

H. H. Honeycutt. Ahoskie, N. C. 

M. P. Davis Aulander, N. C. 

J. F. Cale Roxobel, N. C 

T. C. Keaton Murfreesboro, N. C. 

S. N. Watson Winton, N. C. 

N. J. Todd ; Winterville, N. C. 

W. R. Haight Windsor, N. C. 

L. E. Bailey Como, N. C. 

J. W. Downey Woodland, N. C. 

*J. O. Alderman Edenton, N. C. 

E. F.- Sullivan Murfreesboro, N. C. 

R. B, Lineberry Colerain, N. C. 

Jesse Blalock Severn, N. C. 

K. D. Stukenbrok Jackson, N. C. 

T. L. Brown Lewiston, N. C. 

G. C. Wilder Tunis, N. C. 

Jesse E. Colson Conway, N. C. 

*J. U. Teague Louisburg, N. C. 

*HerT]nan Trueblood. . . . w Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 



OFFICERS. 



C, H. Jenkins, Moderator Aulander, N. C. 

J. F. Cale, Vice-Moderator Roxobel, N. C. 

N. W. Britton, Clerk Winton, N. C. 

W. A. Thomas, Treasurer Cofield, N. C. 

R. B. jLjneberry, Historian Colerain, N. C. 



The officers constitute the Executive Committee of the Associ- 
ation. 



* Pastor, but not residing in the Association, 



4 



THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 



CONSTITUTION. 



Name. 

Article 1. This body shall be known as the North Caroiina 
West Chowan Baptist Association. 

Membership. 

Art. 2. It shall be composed of messengers elected hy the 
churches connected with this body, and all ordained ministers 
who are members or pastors of said churches, together with the 
officers of this Association, and chairmen of all standing com- 
mittees. Each church of one hundred members and under shall 
be entitled to two messengers, and for each additional one hun- 
dred members, an additional messenger: Provided, that no 
church shall have more than four messengers. 

Objects. 

Art. 3. The objects shall be to devise and recommend meas- 
ures for increasing the harmony, the intelligence and the spirit- 
ual power of the churches, and for developing and directing 
their energies, their resources and their gifts, in advancing the 
Redeemer's Kingdom in the earth. 

Powers and Prerogatives. 

Art. 4. The Association shall have no power to infringe upon 
the sovereignty or rights of the churches. It is neither an ecclesi- 
astical nor legislative council, nor court of appeal. It may advise 
the churches and recommend measures of usefulness for their 
adoption, but can not bind them in any way. Yet, in view of the 
combined wisdom, piety and intelligence of the body, it may 
justly claim for itself, for its objects and for its recommendation 
the very highest consideration and regard. 

Art. 5. The Association may dissolve connection with any 
church that becomes heterodox in doctrine, or disorderly in 
practice, or that foils to represent itself, either by messenger or 
letter, more than two successive sessions, without sufficient rea- 
sons, or that treats with contempt its objects and requirements, 
or upon application of a church for dismission. 

Rights of Churches. 

Art. 6. Each individual church shall hold and exercise all 
the functions of an independent church of Jesus Christ. As con- 
stituent members of this Association, the churches shall have 
right to advise, when desired, in case of difficulty, and to sug- 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



5 



gest plans of usefulness to be adopted. It shall be the undis- 
puted privilege of any church to withdraw its membership from 
this Association whenever it shall so elect. 

Duties of Churches. 

Art, 7. It shall be the duty of the churches to appoint as mes- 
sengers, as far as practicable, their most capable members, to 
require their attendance, and to send by them a contribution to 
the Association fund to pay for printing the minutes and other 
necessary expenses. 

Art. 8. It shall be the duty of each church to send an annual 
letter to the Association, giving: (1) Locality; (2) names of 
its pastor and clerk and their respective postoffices; (3) the 
Sabbaths of regular service; (4) the church statistics, including 
the number baptized, received by letter, restored, dismissed, de- 
ceased, expelled, and aggregate membership, male and female; 
(5) Sabbath School statistics; (6) amount contributed to benevo- 
lent objects and the Association fund; (7) names of messengers 
and alternates; (8) any other information deemed of special im- 
portance. 

Organization. 

Art, 9. The officers of this Association shall be a Moderator, 
Vice-Moderator, Clerk, Treasurer, and Historian, who shall be 
elected at each annual session, from the members of the Asso- 
ciation, and shall continue in office until the next annual elec- 
tion, which election shall be the next order of business after the 
enrollment of messengers. As soon as the new officers shall have 
taken their seats, the body shall be declared organized and pre- 
pared for business. 

Art. 10. In order to conserve time and not interfere with the 
main work of the body, this Association will not consider any 
routine or miscellaneous business except at the close of the dis- 
cussion of each general topic. 

Duties of Officers. 

Art. 11. It shall be the duty of the Moderator to open the 
meetings punctually at time appointed; to enforce the rules; to 
preserve order, and to exercise all the prerogatives of a presiding 
officer, according to the principles of parliamentary usage. 

Art. 12. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Moderator to dis- 
charge the duties of the Moderator in his absence. 

Art. 13. It shall be the duty of the Clerk to keep a faithful 
record of the proceedings of the body, and superintend the print- 
ing and distribution of same, and to keep on file the printed 
Minutes and other important documents belonging to the body. 
He may appoint an assistant when necessary. 

Art. 14. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive and 



6 



THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 



disburse the money contributed to the Minute Fund, as diiected 
by the body, and make an annual report of same. ^ . 

Art 15 It shall be the duty of the Historian, who shall be 
elected at' each annual meeting of the body, to prepare for pub- 
im in the Minutes an historical sketch of the church with 
wMch the Association meets, with obituaries, incidents, and other 
7acts of the year that should be preserved, and make report to 
the next Association. , 

Art 16 This Constitution may be altered at any annual ses- 
sion of the body by a vote of two-thirds of the members present. 



Resolutions. 



Resolved (1) That no church shall be entitled to representa- 
tion in this body unless in perfect accord with the Constitution 
thereof, that fact to be ascertained by a committee oi^^^ on c'^' 
dentials, appointed at each session of the body immediate^ afte 
organization; (2) the report of this ^^''^Y^lfJ^'^^^^^^^^ 
erty of the Association just as any other report. (Adopted 18 9 8.) 

Resolved (2) That henceforth this Association withdraw fel- 
lowship from any church that allows its members to ^^^^^f ^^^^ 
manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors as a beverage. 

^^Retolved (3) That it is the sense of this Association that selling 
intoxicating liquors through a dispensary is a violation of the 
spirit and letter of the resolution of our Constitution. (1905.) 



RULES OF ORDER. 

1. The Association shall convene annually at the time and 
place of its own adjournment. 

2 During each annual session it shall meet and adjourn tiom 
day to day at the hours fixed upon by the body. 

3, All meetings of the Association shall be opened and closed 
with religious exercises. 

4. A majority of the members present shall be a quorum tor 
the transaction of business. 

5 No member shall absent himself temporarily without 
leave of the Moderator, nor finally without leave of the body. 

6. No member shall speak more than twice on the same sub- 
ject without permission of the body. ■ 

7 No member shall be allowed to talk, stand up, read or mo.e 
about the house during business, except to gain or impart infor- 
mation under consideration. 

8. No committee shall be in session during the hour of busi- 
ness without permission from the body. H^r-iriprt 

9. All questions of order not herein provided shall be decided 
by Mell's Parliamentary Practice. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7 



ORDER OF BUSINESS. 
First Day. 

10:00 a. m. — Devotional Exercises — Jesse Blalock. 

10:30 a. m. — Enroll Messengers, Organize, Invite Visitors, Call 
Names of Churches that Failed to ' Report L.ast 
Year, Receive New Churches, Appoint Committees^. 

11:00 a. m. — Biblical Recorder, 

11:30 a. m. — Missions — (1) State Missions; (2) Home Mis- 
sions; (3) Foreign Missions; (4) Woman's Work. 

1:00 p. m. — Recess. 

2:00 p. m. — Missions "Continued. 

3:45 p. m.— Assignment of Homes. 
Adjournment. 

7:30 p. m. — Praise Service. 

7:45 p. m.^ — -Introductory Sermon. 

8:45 p. m. — Miscellaneous Business. 
Adjournment. 

Second Day. 

9:30 a. m. — Devotional Exercises — J. W. Downey. 
10:00 a. m. — Report on Church Statistics. 

10:15 a. m. — Christian Education — (1) Sunday-schools; (2) 
Colleges and Schools; (3) Ministerial Education. 
12:15 p. m. — Miscellaneous Business. 
12:30 p. m. — Recess. 
2:00 p. m. — Christian Social Service — (1) Orphanage; (2) 

Ministers' Relief. 
3:15 p.m. — Report of Apportionment Committee. 
3:30 p. m.— Miscellaneous Business. 
Adjournment. 

JOHN F. CALE, 
M. P. DAVIS, 
N. W. BRITTON, 

Committee. 



PROCEEDINGS 



Lewiston, Bertie County, N. C, October 3, 1916. 

The West Chowan Baptist Association met this day, in 
its thirty-fourth session, with the Lewiston Baptist Church. 

The devotional exercises were conducted by R. B. Line- 
berry, after wliich the Moderator, C. H. Jenkins, called the 
Association to order, and the roll of churches was called 
and the delegates were enrolled as follows. 

LIST OF DELEGATES. 

Ahoskie — Robert Holloman, S. E. Dilday, W. H. Miller. 
Aulander — C. W. Mitchell, W. D. Hoggard, *T. C. Williford. 
Ashley's Grove — J. K. Vann, W. H. Vann, W. A. Futrell. 
Askewville — J. R. White, *W. G. White, *H. M. White. 
Bethlehem — W. A. Perry, W. A. Thomas, S. J. Hill. 
Bethany — *H L. Parker, ='=J. D. Evans, *W. J. Daniel. 
Brantley's Grove — ^*G. T. Hoggard, *Ployd Overton. 
Buckhorn— H. J. Vann, -E. N. Howell, *S. P. Winborne. 
Capehart's — T. H. Phelps, H. J. Ward, *J. F. Taylor. 
Cashie— W. L. Lyon, *Thos. Gilliam, *H. G. Mizell, E. L. Gat- 
ling. 

Center Grove— J. D. Jenkins, L. J. Godwin. ^ 
Chowan — J. P. Mitchell, J. S. Shaw. 

Christian Harbor — J. H. Myers, E. V. Grissom, F. P. Britt. 
Colerain— E. T. Forehand, G. T. Pearce, *J. P. Deans, =^P 
Harrell, Jr. 

Connaritsa — J. E. Mathews, Owen Parker, Hodie Jernigan. 
Creeksville — *W. H. Davis, *J. A. Lanier. 
Conway — J. L. Deloatch, B. J. Ricks, R. F. Martin. 
Eiam — ■*T. J. Taylor, *T. J. Bass. 
Galatia — Fred Britton, W. A. Davis, ===D. R. Davis. 
Green's Cross Roads. — *A. D. Cale, G. W. Castellow, W. J. 
Mizelle. 

Harrellsville — * J. M. Taylor, B. N. Sykes. 

Hebron — *H. T. Vann. *J. E. Griffin, W. E. Futrell. 

Hillside — *C. E, Barnes, W. E. Saunders. 

Holly Grove — M. R. Barnes, J. H. Bowen. 

Holly Springs — W. D. McGlaughan, *J. R. Wilder. 

Horton's — A. K. Phelps, H. W. Green. 

Jackson— P. M. Fleetwood, Edwin Wright. 

Kelford — W. C. Evans, C. L. L. Cobb, *Geo. T. Parker. 

Lasker — L. E. Lassiter, *P. L. Askew, D. Cale. 

Lawrence's — *J. W. Langsdale, *J. R. Phelps, *Riley Ray. 

Lewiston — Wayland Mitchell, Wilmor Modlin, T. N. Peele. 

Margarettsville — *J. G. Stancell, *Jordan Edwards. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Mars Hill— G. H. Harrell, J. M. Phelps, *W. T. C. Briggs H 
H. Mizelle. 

Meherrin — Chas. Simons, Willie Vinson, W. J. Davis. 
Mount Carmel— L. L. Taylor, *H. J. Pruden, H. T. Boyed 
Mount Tabor— M. D. Gatling, T. M. Forbes, A. I. Parker 
Murfreesboro— W E. Jenkins. R. Sewell, Uriah Watson 
Menola— *E. W. Baggett, *C. S. Edwards, *J. K. Vinson 
Merry Hill— T. E. White, S. A. Adams, *James Butterton. 
Oak Grove — *A. E. Sanders, *E. L. Marsh. 
Pine Forest — *L. A. Jordan, *W. H. Camp. 
Potecasi— *L. R. Joyner, R. V. Beale, *J. A. Parker 

I Pleasant Grove— W. L. Rawls, Miles Hughes, J. N. Baugham - 
Powellsville— *J. W. Raynor, A. S. Wynns. 
Republican— J. P. Bazemore, L. T. Ward, L. T. Bazemore 
Rich Square— J. T. Bolton, J. P. Lassiter, J. P. Holloman 
: Roanoke— W. F. Nelson, J. L. Newsome, *W. J. Pledspeth. 
Robert s Chapel— D. N. Stephenson, * J. H. Stephenson C R 
Maddrey. 

Ross's— A. F. Castellow, J. H. Lawrence, W. W Mitchell T 
T. Hoggard. ' ' 

Riverside — William Williams. C C Holder 

Sandy Run-A. T. Liverman, A. W. Early,' W. J. Watson, J. 
H. Peele. 

Seaboard — J. R. Crocker, *J. M. Balmer. 

Severn— T. Leggett, C. B. Speller. 

Severn — J. J. White, R. E. Maddrey. 

St. John's — W. P. Howard, *W. P. Britton. 
K- Union — J. A. Copeland, *J. E. Parker. 
B Winton — J. H. Jenkins, A. R. Joyner. 
IP Woodland— J. P. Griffin, J. C. Vaughan, *J. W. Lee. 

^Absent. 

^ Next was the election of officers which resulted as fol- 
lows: C. H. Jenkins, Moderator; J. F. Gale, Vice-Moderator- 
X. W. Britton, Clerk; W. A. Thomas, Treasurer; R. B 
Lineberry, Historian. 

The visiting brethren were then recognized: J. S. Farmer 
Livingston Johnson, Archibald Jonhson, Braxton Craio- w' 
R. Haight, T. S. Crutchfielcl, and R. L. Gay. Brother Haight 
is a new pastor in this Association, located at Windsor. 

T. L. Brown, pastor of the Lewiston Ghurch, extended a 
cordial welcome to the delegates and visitors of the Asso- 
ciation. 

J. F. Gale on request of the Moderator read the Gonsti- 
tution, and Rules of Order. 

^J\^^P''''^ "^'^ Christian Social Service— (1) Orphanage; 
i^j Ministerial Relief— was presented by E. F. Sullivan 



10 



THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 



and was discussed by K. D. Stukenbrok, A. Johnson, M. P. 
Davis, and was adopted. At this point, C. W. Sscarborough 
made a statement concerning the remainder of the debt on 
the Chowan Building at Thomasville, after which J. W. 
Boone moved that a committee be appointed to apportion 
among the churches the amount still due on the Chowan 
Building, making January the month for wiping out the 
debt. Committee— M. P. Davis, J. F. Cale, C. G. Powell, P. 
M. FleetAvood, E. S. Catling, and S. N. Watson. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN SOCIAL SERVICE. 

This report covers two very important phases of our work in 
this Association — the Orphanage and Ministerial Relief. 

(1) The Thomasville Orphanage — the Orphanage holds first 
place in the hearts of our people. They give to it more than to 
any other one cause. 

During the ten years between 1905 and 1915 permanent im- 
provements to the amount of $90,000, and an increase in real 
estate to the amount of $125,000 were made to the Orphanage. 
But all of this means room for more children, and more chil- 
dren means more money needed for current expenses. In 1905 
they had only 301 children, now they have 500. 

They now give training through the tenth grade instead of the 
seventh. They also give instrumental music now. Twenty-nine 
boys and girls graduated from the Orphanage school this year. 

The "One day for the Orphanage" Thanksgiving offering along 
with some bequests has reduced to about one half the debt of 
$21,000 reported at the last session of the Baptist State Con- 
vention. 

Our Association gave last year $4,296 or about $370 more than 
the year before. 

(2) Ministerial Relief — It is the purpose of this Board to ex- 
tend aid to every aged or afflicted minister who is in want and 
whose poverty is the result of a life given to the preaching of the 
gospel. 

Most of the men who receive aid from this Board are in need, 
because they gave themselves as "living sacrifices" and either 
could not or did not lay up for old age. More end more the 
feeling grows that a minister should not strive to make money. 

There are at present thirtj^-five ministers and widows of min- 
isters receiving aid from this Board. Our prayers and our 
mjoney should go out to help these old soldiers of the cross. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



11 



Our Association gave last year $2 6 8.4 5 for tliis purpose. Thir- 
teen of our churches did not contribute to this cause. 
Respectfully submitted, 

ED. F. SULLIVAN, 
K. D. STUKENBROK, 
J. P. HOLLOMAN, 

Committee. 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The Association reconvened at two o'clock, the devotional 
exercises being conducted by C. L. Dowell. 

The moderator appointed the following committees — Re- 
ligions exercises : Pastor and deacons of Ijewiston Church ; 
Time, Place and Preacher for the next session: C. W. Scar- 
borough, S. N. Watson, Dr. Wayland Mitchell; Order of 
Business: J. F. Cale, N. W. Britton, M. P. Davis; Finance: 
J. P. Holloman. 

The report on Christian Education — (1) Sunday-schools; 
(2) Colleges and Schools; (3) Ministerial Education — was 
presented by J. F. Cale, and was spoken to by J. F. Cale, 
G. E. Lineberry, Braxton Craig, and was adopted. On 
motion, it was agreed that the Association raise for Chris- 
tian Education two-fifths as much as was raised this year 
for State Missions. 

Homes were assigned and on motion the Association ad- 
journed with prayer by S. N. Watson. 

The Association suspended the regular order to give J. 
S. Farmer, the Business Manager of the Biblical Recorder, 
an opportunity to present the claims of the Recorder. 

The Association adjourned for dinner, with the bene- 
diction by Livingston Johnson. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION. 

Jesus laid upon His followers, as an imperative obligation, the 
task of planting and propagating the Kingdom of God in all the 
earth. In the accomplishment of this task, we believe that Chris- 
tian tlducation is elementary and fundamental. Our fathers 
realized the need for trained religious leaders in their day, and 
sought to supply it. This belief in Christian Education, growing 
with the passing years, has deepened with our people into an 
abiding conviction, and is begetting a new consciousness that 
leads to new and renewed denominational emphasis. 

One year ago our Association placed new emphasis on Chris- 
tian Education by recognizing the Sunday-school as a training 



12 



THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 



agency. It is now one of three co-working agencies in 
the field of Christian Education. This report will concern it- 
self with these three agencies, as follows: (1) Sunday-schools; 
(2) Colleges and Schools; (3) Ministerial Education. 

Sunday-'schooLs. 

The importance of the Sunday-school as a training agency 
can not be too strongly emphasized. The Sunday-school in 
divine economy, occupies a place that is entirely unique. It 
stands between the family and the pulpit, forming a linking pro- 
cess between the two. Supplementing the work of the family 
on the one hand and that of the pulpit on the other, it becomes 
one of the three co-working agencies ordained of God to impart 
moral and religious training to the race. 

Our Sunday-school work is growing. While there is yet much 
to be accomplished before we can claim a satisfying degree of 
proficiency in Sunday-school work, yet we congratulate ourselves 
upon the degree of success already attained in this department 
of denominational activity. A review of the year's work re- 
veals progress. General conditions are the most encouraging 
ever. Our report to the Convention last year showed a gain of 
sixty-eight schools over the previous year, with a gain of 13,7 85 
in memibersliip. Much is being accomplished through class or- 
ganization. North Carolina leads the States in the number of 
organized classes. Progress is also being made in the work of 
standardizing our schools. We reported eight A-1 or standard 
schools last year; the number promises to be several fold larger 
this year. We are making some progress in teacher training. 
We can not overestimate the value of this work, nor emphasize 
it too strongly. Many churches are providing' Sunday-school 
equipment in the way of buildings adapted to the purposes of 
Sunday-school work. 

This spirit of progressiveness in Sunday-school methods, ef- 
forts and equipment is evidenced nowhere more to our much 
pleasing than in our own Association. It both assures and re- 
assures us as to the future of this phase of our religious educa- 
tional life. 

We would call attention to some tasks yet confronting us in our 
Sunday-school work: (1) The task of enrolling in our Sunday- 
schools the thousands of our unenlisted church members; (2) 
The task of improving the organization and equipment of all our 
schools; (3) the task of putting on teacher training in all our 
schools; (4) the task of lining up all our schools in a once-a- 
nionth collection for the Orphanage. 

Colleges and Schools. 

Both government and religion are interested in education. It 
is not the function of the State, however, to teach religion; 
neither is it the prerogative of the church to occupy herself with 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION i 

government. The State must educate In the interest of govern 
ment, the church must educate in the interest orreLton Se 

tXnrwisdor "^---^ ^ -»:rTc„.s 
nirou^r™c:,i-rLrrhor. r^j^::::, xr- 

■ tern at present there are fourteen high schools and hr. "'T 

-%=raiVn\;T:tr"^^^^^^^^^^^ - 

perative need for a new dormitory The open^fft Oh' ™' 
.s iine. both in numbers and quality. Let uf -o'ce and tl'e 
— ge by reason o, God's blessings upon this phase of lu^ 

We would urge our people to a more loyal support of o.,r 
3Iiiiisterial Education. 

ban that Of Ministerial Education. The need for the "" k o 
th.s Board ,s greater today than ever before. ' The improved 
educational condition of the people, the spread of issues among 
the uncultured, the destructive effect of higher criticism, alT de 
, mand a well-equipped ministry 

ha^th^e'^niff'"'"*^"'' '^'^'^^ Louisville we 

of the 1 . *° "^'^^^'OP the men. The woV> 

I :£{=;?■ =" irxir 



14 



THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 



the work from North Carolina is steadily growing The num- 
ber lira our own Association is exceedingly ^-tifymg^ In our 
high schools are many who are preparing to enter Wake Forest 
At Wake Forest there are now seventy-two in training, most ot 
whom will enter the Seminary later. In our Seminary at Louis- 
ville are twenty-six from North Carolina who will soon go forth 
rs abL'' miniLrs of Christ. God is indeed blessing our work. 

Let us ^ray God to thrust forth yet more laborers into His 
harvest- and let us pledge ourselves to stand loyally by the 
cause of Ministerial Education. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. BLALOCK, 
ED. CATLING, 

Committee. 



TUESDAY EVENING SESSION. 

After song service, the annual sermon was preached by 
K D. Stukenbrok from Luke 6:46. 

On motion, the Biblical Recorder was given a place on 
the program to be considered immediately after organiza- 

Association adjourned with prayer by T. C. Keaton. 

WEDNESDAY MORNING SESSION 

After devotional exercises, the committee on Time and 
Plnce made the following report: Tnne'-Tuesday after the 
S:u.hXnday in October, 1917 ; Place-Ahoskie ; To preach 
the sermon T. C. Keaton or W. R. Haight. , ^ , • 
''The "eport on Church Statistics was made, -d f^^^J,. 

M. P. Davis read the report on Missions--(l) State Mis 
sions: (2) Home Missions; (3) ^^^^^^^ 
men's Work. This report was discussed by P. ^ayis 
Prx^oii Craig, C. W. Mitchell, L. E. Dailey, and Livingston 
Johnson. The report was adopted. 

REPORT ON MISSIONS. 
''Go ve therefore, and make disciples of all the nations, bap- 
tizing them into the name of the Father and of the Son and of 
the HO y Spirit: teaching them to observe all thmgs whatso- 
ever ^command you; and, lo, I am with you always, even unto 
thp end of the world." Matt. 28: 19, 20. 

•Ye Shan receive power, when the Holy Spirit - -me upon 
you; and ye shall be my witnesses both in Jerusalem and in 
all Judea and Samaria, and unto the uttermost part ot the 
earth." Acts 1:8. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 15 



While there are many Scripture texts that impell us to give 
the gospel to all the world; the two passages quoted above, 
being among the last words of our Lord while on earth, are 
especially binding both in scope and method. Of all the teach- 
ings of our Savior there are more concise, positive, or 
exacting than the one of giving the gospel to all nations, all 
races, and all tongues: yet, fewer of His people are obeying 
this command than any other of His teachings. Jesus Christ 
was not provincial; His vision was world-wide. Speaking to 
the Jews he said: "And other sheep, I have, which are not of this 
fold: them also I must bring, and they shall hear my voice; 
and there shall be one fold, and one shepherd; and they shall 
come from the Bast, and from the West, and from the North, 
and from the South, and shall sit down in the Kingdom of God." 
Hence we are forced to the conclusion that God sees the world 
not in divisions but as a whole. That there is no part of it 
that is loved above another; that there is no race or tongue that 
is dearer to Him than another, for He would "that none should 
perish, but that all should come unto Him and be saved." 

But in carrying out the command of our Lord we have di- 
vided up the world in divisions for convenience sake, into 
State, Home and Foreign Missions. To us State Missions means 
work in North Carolina; Home Missions means work in the 
bounds of the Southern Baptist Convention; and Foreign Mis- 
sions means wprk in foreign countries. 

State Missions. 

There are about 15 men employed to preach the gospel in 
North Carolian by our State Board of Missions and under the 
blessings of God the reports from these messengers of peace 
are the best ever submitted. Last year there were over a 
thousand more baptisms and five hundred more added by letter 
than the year before. Nearly two thousand dollars more were 
given by these mission churches to the objects of the Con- 
vention arid nearly a thousand dollars more were given towards 
the support of these mission pastors than in the year past. 

The following statistics give, as near as statistics can give, the 
result of the year's work: 



Number of sermons preached 13,541 

Churches and out-stations supplied 441 

Baptisms 3,687 

Added byletter 2,302 

Church houses building. 34 

Church houses completed 19 

Churches organized 15 

. Paid on salaries $39,447.46 

Paid on church buildings $26,743.37 



16 



THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 



Paid for missions and benevolences 

Number of Sunday-schools 

Number of pupils 

Conversions from these schools . . 



$30,824.80 
404 
45.840 
2.036 



Eight years ago the Sunbeams gave, through the Board, five 
hundred dollars for the church building at Asheboro. Since 
then the mission bands have aided sixty churches in building 
house of worship, whose aggregate value is $245,000. For every 
dollar given through the Board for church buildings the mission 
churches gave seven dollars. We believe the aid given to these 
struggling churches has brought greater returns than any other 
equal amount for many years. 

The West Chowan is expected to raise the coming year for 
State Missions $3,500. 



The Home Mission Board has its work divided into several 
departments for convenience and for the highest degree of ef- 
ficiency. 

( 1 ) Eiilistmeiit. — This department has been in existence for 
four years and from the first has not lacked for a great and 
needy field. Once-a-month churches have been encouraged to 
call a pastor for half time and to give more adequate support 
to the pastors. Churches are inspired to build pastor's homes 
and erect suitable houses of worship; churches formed into pas- 
toral fields, every-member canvasses are conducted for church 
and mission support, and Sunday-schools are stimulated into 
greater activity. 

( 2 ) Co-operative Work. — In thirteen States the Home Board 
is doing co-operative work with the State Boards in evangelizing 
the destitute sections. In some of the States very little 
money is expended by the Home Board, while in others the 
co-operative work is very extensive. In Virginia the Home Board 
aids in the support of only two white missionaries, while in 
Oklahoma the number is 22 3. 

( 3 ) Mountain School Work. — The Home Board gives aid to 
thirty-four schools in the mountain section of our Southland. 
These schools employ 156 teachers and have 5,218 pupils. These 
schools are missionary agencies and are training many of our 
future pastors, missionaries, and other classes of religious work- 
ers, besides the many hundreds who are now in the field at work. 

(4) Evangelism. — This department was organized in 1906. It 
has now twenty-nine evangelists who are winning thousands of 
souls to Christ. Its field is primarily the less evangelized sec- 
tions of our Southland, including the larger cities. 

(5) Church Building. — In 1912 the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion ordered the Board to undertake the raising of a million- 
dollar church building loan fund. A beginning has been made 
and now the Judson Memorial Fund has been raised, it is ex- 



Home Missions. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



17 



pected that the Home Board will press this most needy fund 
There are in the territory of the Southern Baptist Convention 
. near y 4,000 churches without houses of worship. Nearly aH 
of these are weak, struggling churches and must have aid in 
building adequate houses. 

(6) Work Among Foreigners.— There are about 3,500,000 for- 
eigners m the territory of the Southern Baptist Convention 
Nearly all of these are Roman Catholics who know nothing of 
our history, our institutions, and our religion. They are i^' 
thev wirbT"' ""^ ^"Pe-tltlous. If they are not ChrLtianized 
they will be a menace to all our institutions, which. In fact 
they are now m many sections of our country 

T J-"" ^"T ^"^'^ ""'"S successful work among the 

Indians and negroes; in Cuba and the Canal Zone 

Hnlr J^^" Association Is expected to raise $2,600 for 

Home Missions the coming year. 

Foreign Missions. 
The Foreign Mission Board Is doing work in eight foreign 

Italy Mexico, and Uruguay, and indirectly in Chili. North Caro 
■hna has missionaries in Argentina, China, Japan, and Mexico 
IZ T C Trltrn.'™"" "^''^ '^'^o"^" Assocation, Mr Tnd 
^ The primary work of our missionaries is to preach the gospel 

fouZo^" -perLce it has be'e! 

louiid of great benefit to get the children and young people under 
the training and Influence of our missionaries. Hence school • 
have been established where the young can be taught daHy the 
gospel as well as text-books. And often through these students 
the parents are reached. Many of the young converts want in 

e:tZT2:\TT"'' ""^'^ '^''^ theologlcarsrols harbee.: 
established to train evangelists, pastors and other religious work- 

list^eftrtL'""'"";^ "^"^^ th"- he win 

~ T"^' """^ and especially if the 

est?M s;:,''"-T:hes'\"^i'r'^'"- """-^ '^"^''"^'^ been 
treated ':st yet ""'''^ """"" ^-"-"^ 

larfhaf "^T^V '^^^^^'^^ "^""on dol- 

lars has been subscribed. The fund is to give better nhvsic°.i 

"Cgtlt^rd^'N""" T''"'' ' h?s e^utm'fnfh: 

thank God ani II e-J^iPment is In sight we should 

thank God and take courage and press forward towards greater 

Itt'eir/"'',°l Board has been raised 

Th s deht P^"""^ '=a" 10 'n a time of emergency' 

b« t on?'TT?ey™o? l^ur'^B^^'^d ^"^^""^^ ^-^^"'^ 
t.at contrlbuU-ilbelrirortr Tebf t'l.rnTt t^^^Zt 



18 



THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 



standard on the current fund. If this be true a great calamity 
will befall our Foreign Mission work. Let every church of our 
Association guard against this. 

We are expected to raise for Foreign Missions this year $3,750. 

Woman's Work. 

No one can estimate the value of the Woman's Missionary 
Union to the Southern Baptist Convention, nor can any mind 
calculate its worth in spreading the Kingdom of God on earth. 

During the last Convention year the Union established over 
3,000 new Societies, distributed over 367,000 leaflets and pamph- 
lets, and raised more than $418,000 for the Kingdom of God. 
There is no doubt that the Baptists of the South owe to the Unions 
a debt of gratitude which is beyond the power of words to ex- 
press. It behooves each one of us who want the Kingdom of 
God realized among men, to give them our most cordial good 
will and co-operation. The Woman's Work of the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention is divided into five divisions; namely, the Wo- 
man's Missionary Society, The Young Woman's Auxiliary, The 
Girls' Auxiliary, The Royal Ambassadors, and The Sunbeams. 
The women train the boys and girls through these organiza- 
tions and by the time they reach maturity they are filled with 
the mission spirit and are zealous in helping to advance the 
Kingdom of God. This means that the coming generation will 
have a vision of their duty, give liberally of their means, and 
many will lay down their lives upon the altar of service to be 
used of God in the homeland and to go into the uttermost pans 
of the earth; 

The women of the Woman's Missionary Union enter enthusi- 
astically into every enterprise of our denomination. They gave 
liberally and sacrificially to the Judson Memorial Fund. 

They have before them now two high and lofty heights to 
climb One of these heights is $150,000 for the Training School 
in Louisville, Ky., and of this amount $52,000 had already been 
raised at last report. The other height is the raising of $325,- 
000 for the Church Building and Loan Fund of the Home Mis- 
sion Board. This peak they will climb with the earnestness of 
their holy zeal. „ 

The women of our own Association have sent out to the for- 
eigh field this year Miss Pearl Johnson, paying her salary 
for the first year over and above their former contributions. 

We would remind the pastors and brethren of Paul's injunc- 
tion, "help the women." 

We would close this report with the words of the poet: 

"We are living, we are dwelling. 
In a grand and awful time, 
In an age on ages telling 
To be living is sublime." 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



19 



Total amount to be raised for missions by us this year is 
$9,850. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. P. DAVIS, 
L. E. DAILEY, 
J. T. BOLTON, 

Committee. 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION. 

T. S. Crutchfield conducted the devotional exercises, after 
which, on motion, a collection was taken for J. R. Mathews 
an honored minister, who is now under the hand of afflic- 
tion, which collection amounted to $33.60. 

The Treasurer's report was read by C. L. Dowell, and was 
adopted. 

TREASURER'S REPORT. 

October 6, 1915, to balance on hand .$ 4 89 

October 7, 1915, to amount received from Finance Com- 
mittee 83 

December 3, 1915, to amount received from N. W. Britton 5.00 

'^^^^^ $112.72 

Cr. 

December 4, 1915, by amount paid N. W. Britton for ser- 
vices as Clerk 35 00 

December 4, 1915, by amount paid The Mutual Publishing 

Co., Raleigh, N. C, for printing minutes 75. OO 

Total $ 110 00 

October 3, 1916, balance due West Chowan Association 2! 7 2 

$112 72 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. P. THOMAS, Treasurer. 

On motion, the reading of the Constitution at the Asso- 
ciation is hereafter dispensed with. 

A motion was made that all churches that do not pay 
anything to the minute fund shall receive only one copy of 
the minutes. The motion was tabled. 

On motion the following committee was appointed to look 
into the conditions of our Sunday-schools, and make recom- 
mendations to the next session of the body as to what is 



2 THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 



best to be done, in order to imjprove the said conditions: G. 
E. Lineberry, E. F. Sullivan, J. F. Cale, C. W. Mitchell, J. 
H. Mathews. 

R. B. Lineberry read the report of the Apportionment 
Committee. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



21 



APPORTIONMENT FOR 1916-1917--WEST OHOWAN ASSO- 
CIATION. 



Chuclies 



Ahoskie 

Aulander 

Asiieley's Grove 

Askewville 

Bethlehem 

Bethany 

Brantley's Grove 

■kckhorn 

^K)eha.rt's 

«shie - 

Bnter Grove 

Wftwan 

'Christian Harbor 

'■'o! era in 

:|' 'onnaritsa 

'reeksville 

;( 'onwciv - 

"Klam ■ 

' inlatia 

Green's Cross Roads_. 

ilarrellsville 

'Hebron 

iHill.side 

Holly Grove 

jlloUy Springs 

Hort(?^i's 

^Tackson 

iKelford 
^^R^ker 



renoe 

iston 

iarettsville 



Hill 



'!t. Carmel 

Murfreesboro _ 

ptt. Tabor 

'iVFenola 

flerry Hill 

iPak Grove 

jl'ine Forest 

fl'o+ecasi 

pleasant Grove 
s'owellsville 

'Republican 

,''ich Square 

Roanoke 

Robert's Chapel 

/■'oss's 

I' riverside 

;;-andy Run 
{Heaboard 

5iloam 

'Ipevern 

>t. John 

Jnion 

Vinton 

►Voodland 



■Jl 
PI 






_o 


.2 


.2 












1 










a; 








'S 


CO 


Hoi 


For 


175 


f 160 


$ 200 


175 


150 


200 


45 


25 


35 


30 


20 


30 


60 


35 


60 


35 


25 


45 


40 


30 


45 


200 


160 


200 


40 


25 


40 


135 


105 


135 


40 


25 


40 


150 


130 


150 


40 


30 


40 


115 


80 


120 


50 


40 


55 


12 


8 


12 


75 


60 


75 


35 


30 


40 


35 


25 


40 


35 


25 


35 


50 


35 


50 


30 


20 


30 


10 


6 


10 


45 


35 


50 


15 


10 


15 


17 


14 


18 


50 


40 


55 


40 


35 


45 


25 


20 


25 


37 


25 


3 7 


80 


60 


90 


15 


10 


15 


1-35 


00 


110 


55 


40 


55 


35 


27 


40 


125 


80 


125 


190 


155 


200 


50 


30 


70 


20 


15 


20 


25 


18 


25 


5 


3 


5 


65 


50 


65 


40 


30 


40 


70 


50 


70 


50 


30 


60 


110 


90 


115 


15 


10 


15 


175 


125 


175 


75 


50 


75 


12 


7 


12 


60 


40 


60 


40 


30 


40 


6 


4 


6 


100 


75 


110 


25 


18 


30 


70 


55 


85 


70 


50 


70 


75 


60 


80 



ions 




;ion 


lief 


chool 
Miss: 








9 






m 


SVD 








c 

%■ 








u 


CO 


.s 


Xfl 


O 






10 . 


> 200 


$ 70 


$ 25 


10 


200 


70 


20 


1 


50 


18 


3 


2 


3 5 


18 




2 


60 


24 


5 


2 




14 


g 






16 


3 


10 


250 


80 


20 


2 


25 


16 


5 


6 


250 


54 


10 


2 


60 


16 


5 


5 


225 


60 


10 


1 


60 


16 


5 


4 


160 


46 


13 


4 


80 


20 


g 


1 


25 


4 


3 


3 


130 


30 


g 


4 


150 


15 


g 


5 


25 


14 




1 


20 


14 


3 


2 


1 KJ 


20 


g 


1 


25 


12 


4 


1 


5 


4 


2 


5 


OU 


18 




1 


15 




2 


2 




g 




4 


100 


35 


10 


3 


60 


16 


g 


1 


o u 


10 


3 


2 


3 


14 


4 


3 


75 


32 


10 


1 


20 




4 


4 


J / O 


50" 




3 


60 


22 




2 


35 


14 





10 


105 


50 


5 


4 




76 


a 


3 


60 


20 


5 


1 


3 


g 


^ 


1 


25 


10 


3 


1 


5 


2 


1 


3 


125 


26 


5 


1 


35 


10 


5 


2 


65 


28 


5 


5 


105 


10 




5 


150 


44 


g 


1 


15 


6 


2 


5 




74 


12 


2 


60 


30 


6 




12 


4 


2 


3 


60 


24 


6 


3 


55 


20 


8 


1 


10 


2 


2 


5 


160 


40 


10 


2 


35 


10 


5 


3 


80 


28 


6 


2 


50 


28 


3 


3 


65 


30 


6 











840 
825 
177 
134 
246 
147 
156 
920 
153 
695 
188 
730 
192 
538 
255 
65 
379 
2 74 
149 
133 
233 
122 
38 
218 
64 
77 
294 
204 
114 
149 
350 
71 
531 
240 
158 
500 
858 
238 
98 
107 
22 
339 
161 
290 
265 
520 
64 
776 
298 
51 
253 
196 
31 
500 
125 
327 
273 
319 



$3,624 $2,700$ $3,790 $179 $4,565 $1,454 $361 $16,673 



22 



THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 



The Finance Committee, J. P. Holloman, reported $112.0C 
received for the minute fund. 

E. F. Sullivan was appointed to secure funds to pay th( 
expenses of the delegate to the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion. 

By a rising vote, the following resolution was passed 
Whereas, we as delegates of the Association have received' 
the very kindest treatment, having been well fed, well 
housed, and hospitably received ; Be it Resolved : That this! 
Association offer a rising vote of thanks to this church, heil 
pastor, and the citizens of Lewiston for their kindness. j 

On motion, the following resolutions in regard to prohibi- 
tion were passed, after R. L. Gay addressed the Association 
briefly on these resolutions : 

RESOLUTION ON PROHIBITION. 

Whereas, the people of North Carolina in 1908, by a majorit 
of 44,000 declared for State-wide prohibition. 

And whereas, the legalized liquor traffic in other States, an( 
the lawless liquor traffic in this State, have put forth a persisten 
and continued effort to nullify our prohibition laws. 

And, whereas, under the guise of lawfully selling wine an( 
cider and lawfully shipping and receiving liquor into this Statej 
the liquor forces have violated our prohibition laws to the detri! 
ment of the best interests of the home, the school, and th' 
church; 

And, whereas, the Anti-Saloon League through its Board o 
Trustees has declared for legislation to keep whiskey from beini 
delivered in the State, to prohibit the sale of wine and hard cideii 
to prohibit social clubs from storing or keeping liquor, and t^l| 
prohibit the advertising of liquor in any form. 

Therefore, be it resolved that the West Chowan Associatio 
records its approval of such legislation. I 

Resolved secondly. That we call upon the membership of th! 
churches throughout this Association to rally to the support c| 
the Anti-Saloon League and assist them in putting this legislatio| 
through. 

Resolved third. That Rev. R. L. Gay, Field Secretary of th 
Anti-Saloon League, be requested to present a copy of thes' 
resolutions to the committees of the General Assembly that sha 
have before them for consideration the legislation above referre* 
to. 1 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 2 3 



HISTORIAN'S REPORT. 



Buildings and Equipment. 

A $2,000 house for pastor's home has been built at Severn. 
At Conway the church has been repainted and a $300 light plant 
installed. Margarettsville has put down an artesian well, costing 
$100. Bethlehem has installed lights and is prepared for 
night service. Pleasant Grove has bought a nice church organ. 
Holly Grove bought new pews, installed lights, paid off all debts 
and dedicated the church. Ahoskie has electric lights and a 
new library. 

Pastoral Changes. 

In January, Rev. D. P. Harris left his field of work in and 
around Windsor for work in Chowan Association. Rev. J. F. 
Cale became pastor at Askewville and is supply pastor at Sandy 
Run. Rev. S. B. Barnes became pastor at Lawrence. Rev. H. 
H. Honeycutt gave up Harrellsville and took charge of Cape- 
harts and Merry Hill. Rev. R. B. Lineberry has been supply 
pastor at Harrellsville. Rev. T. T. Speight has been this year 
pastor at Kelford and Winton. Rev. W. R. Haight begins with 
October as pastor of Cashie. Centre Grove has taken two Sunday 
afternoon services and increased the pastor's salary. There has 
been increase in pastor's salary at Potecasi, Creekville and Ahos- 
kie. Mt. Carmel has as pastor Rev. J. U. Teague. 

Necrologj^ 

On March 25, 1916, Mrs. Martha Vann Holleman, wife of 
Deacon Robert Holleman, and daughter of the late Albert C. 
Vann and his wife, Harriett Gattling Vann, died in Ahoskie. Sis- 
ter Holleman united with Mt. Tabor Church when fourteen years 
old. She married at the age of twenty. She lived happily with 
her husband and five boys and three girls, who were born to 
their home. She was a woman of energy and resourcefulness 
and was like Dorcas, full of good works and almsdeeds which 
she did. Her life was unselfish and the sick and sorrowing and 
troubled were always sure to receive her encouragement, com- 
fort and help. Like an angel of mercy she moved among the 
scenes to bring cheer and blessing to those who were troubled and 
sad or in need of sympathy. Her life and works will be remem- 
bered and cherished by many admiring friends and acquaint- 
ances who came under her beneficent influence or were the sub- 
jects of her gentle ministries. She was a sister of Mr. A. C. 
Vann, of Ahoskie, of Mr. T. E. Vann, Como, and Dr. R. T. Vann, 
of Raleigh. The whole community and country around sympa- 
thize with her bereaved husband and children in their great 



24 



THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 



loss, but rejoice that her labors ended, she has now entered upon 
her everlasting rest and reward. 

Creeskville lost in the death of Brother Edwin Lassiter, one 
of the deacons and Sunday-school superintendent since the church 
was organized. He was much honored and beloved by his church 
and community and is greatly missed by pastor and people. He 
was sixty-eight years old. Brother W. B. Edwards of this church 
died at the age of sixty-eight. He was very faithful to his 
church and much loved. This church also lost in death of 
Sister Sarah B. Futrell. She was fifty-six years old, was a 
charter member and noted for her presence at church and her 
great loyalty. 

Pleasant Grove suffered great loss in the death of Brother 
J. S. Hughes. He was an honored deacon for several years and 
led the church singing. He was liberal and faithful to church 
and pastor. This church has lost this year about sixty-five mem- 
bers by death, letter and exclusion, mostly by letter because of 
the new church at Horton's. 

Galatia lost in the death of Sister Martha Taylor, aged seventy. 
She was a faithful, good woman. Of the same church. Sister 
Sallie Garris died at the age of fifty. A good, kind and loving 
mother. Sister Mattie Lee Davis of this church died at the age 
of thirty-two. A kind and affectionate wife and mother and a 
zelous and devout Christian. 

Ashley's Grove Church lost in the death of Deacon Hoggard 
Askew, aged sixty-five. For forty-six years he had been a mem- 
ber and for many years a deacon in the Baptist church. In 
every way he was a devout Christian. 

Brother William Vaughan became a member of Lasker Church 
in September, 1915, and died April 1, 1916, His church career 
was short but good. 

Mrs. Johnnie Stancil, widow of B. D. Stancil, died September 
2. She was a consecrated member of Margarettsville Church. 

Colerain lost heavily in the death of five consecrated sisters. 
Two of them, Mrs. Asenath Valentine and Octavia Northcott, 
each about seventy-five years old, were especially noted for their 
consecration and piety, and the other three younger were each 
ardent church members: Mrs. Martha Perry, Mrs. Mayna Askew 
and Mrs. Nettie Harrell. 

Harrellsville lost in the death of Sister Elizabeth Lowe. 

Ross's lost Sister Mary Ann Phelps and Brother Taylor Jerni- 
gan, whose name stood second on the roll. 

Christian Harbor Church sustained a great loss in the death 
of Brother W. I. Lloyd, consecrated, zealous and fervent in 
spirit. 

W. H. Mitchell was born February 9, 185 5, and died Sep- ; 
tember 16, 1916. In early life he united with Connaritsa Church 
and was by this church made deacon in young manhood. About 
twenty-five years ago he moved his membership to Aulander 
Church and was received as a deacon. At his death he was chair- 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 2 5 



man of the board of deacons. For many years he was clerk 
of his church and resigned a few months before his death on 
account of failing health. For several years just preceding his 
death he was superintendent of Aulander Sunday-school. He was 
a true and faithful church worker, loyal to every branch of the 
church work. A good citizen, promoted education whenever he 
could and was always on the right side of every moral ques- 
tion. For two terms he served with fidelity as mayor of the town 
of Aulander — is the tribute of his pastor. 

Mt. Carmel lost heavily in the death of Sister Lizzie G. Tay- 
lor, one of the best and most noble workers — was a great leader 
in all church work. They lost also in the deaths of Sisters Mollie 
N. Stephenson and Rachel Wheeler. 

Askewville lost much in the death of Brother W. H. White. 

Sandy Run Church lost by death Deacon J. C. Tyner. 

A distinct loss to our Association was Brother J. W. Mitchell, 
of Holly Grove. He was brother of the late Elder John Mit- 
chell. He had been deacon of his church for more than twenty 
years. He was a successful man who had acquired much means 
and was liberal with it to his church. He was devoted and 
loyal to his church in attendance, service and pay. 

LeA\astoii Church. 

Lewiston Baptist Church was organized September 26, 1883, by 
a presbytery consisting of Revs. Jere Bunch and Thomas G. Wood, 
their careers of service in the Kingdom of God the same year, 
in a hall belonging to the Woodville Grange. They had little 
or no preaching during their first year, but in November, 1884, 
Rev. C. W. Scarboro come to their rescue and supplied for 
them one Saturday in each month, until April, 1885, when Dr. 
John Mitchell took charge as first pastor of the church. He 
remained with the church' for three years. Since that time tli^ 
church has been served by Dr. T. T. Speight, J. W. Powell, S. B. 
Barnes. Thos. G. Wood, R. L. Gay, J. F. Cale, and the present 
pastor, T. L. Brown. 

The Lewiston Church and the West Chowan Association began 
their coreers of service in the Kingdom of God the same year, 
and the records show that a conference held on the day the 
church was organized, appointed delegates to the first session 
of the new Association to be organized the following month in 
old Cashie Church. 

During the present year the church has spent about $3,600 in 
remodeling their house of worship, and they now have a good 
workshop, well adapted to Sunday-school and other church work. 

R. B. LINEBERRY, Historian. 



26 



THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 



DIGEST OP CHURCH LETTERS. 

Received. 

By baptism 495 

By letter 266 

By restoration 53 814 



Contributions. 

Associational Missions 25.00 

State Missions 3,644.15 

Home Missions 2,841.37 

Foreign Missions 4,994.38 

Sunday School Missions 244.13 

Orphanage 5,673.63 

Ministers' Relief 234.81 

Ministerial Education 631.74 

Colleges and schools 808.42 

Other objects . 4,388.56 



Loss. 

By letter 308 

By exclusion 143 

By death 110 561 



Gain 253 

Total membership 13,480 

Expenses for Home Purposes. 

Pastor's salaries $17,780.00 

Buildings and repairs 11,177.34 

Poor 775.79 

Incidentals 3,698.81 

Sunday-school expenses 2,066.11 

Minute Fund 111.28 



35,609.33 



Total $23,486.19; 



Grand total $59,095.52i 

Contributions for everything except home purposes are a little| 
over eight per cent increase over last year. 

The following' delegates were elected: To the Baptist 
State Convention — G. E. Lineberry, T. L. Brown, and J. P. 
Hoiloman; To the Southern Baptist Convention, J. W. 
Downey, 

, J. F, Cale was re-elected a member of the State Mission 
Board; M. P. Davis, Vice-President of the Foreign Mission 
Board ; W. R. Haight, Vice-President of the Home Mission 
Board. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



27 



The Association adjourned with prayer by C. W. Scar- 
borough. 

CHAS. H. JENKINS, Moderator. 
N. W. BRITTON, Clerk. 



COMMITTEES. 

Missions — R. B. Lineberry, J. M. Jacobs, J. P. Holloman, 
Herbert Jenkins, Dancy Cale. 

Christian Education — G. E. Lineberry, C. W. Scarbor- 
ough, C. W. Mitchell, E. White, H. W. Earley. 

Christian Social Service — W. R. Haight, J. *W. Boone, J. 
W. Downey, H. J. Vann. 

Apportionment Committee — M. P. Davis, J. ¥. Cale, C. G. 
Powell, P. M. Fleetwood, E. L. Catling, S. N. Watson. 

Sunday-Schools— J. F. Cale, C. W. Mitchell, J. H. Math- 
ews. 



28 



THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 



31INUTES OF WEST CHOWAN WOMAN'S MISSIONARY 
UNION, JULY 26, 1916. 



Morning Session. 

The Twenty-second Annual Meeting of the Woman's Mission- 
ary Union, Auxiliary to the West Chowan Association, was held 
in Meherrin Baptist Church, July 2 6, 1916, Mrs. R. L. Bolton, 
Superintendent, presiding. 

After the opening hymn, "Come Thou Almighty King," Mrs. 
D. L. Myers, of Ahoskie, read the 9 7th Psalm and Rev. Braxton 
Craig led the Union in prayer. 

Mrs. J. R. Parker, of Meherrin, gave a very cordial welcome. 

The Minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted. The 
Treasurer's report showed balance in bank as follows: Johnson 
Fund, $108.65; Expense Fund, $27.76. 

Mrs. John Freeman made a motion that the Union support 
Miss Pearl Johnson another year. After a discussion by Mrs. 
Stukenbrok, Mrs. W. N. Jones and others the motion was car- 
ried. 

Something was said about changing the time of the annual 
meeting from July to September, but for several reasons it was 
decided best iiot to change the time. 

The following visitors were recognized: Mrs. W. N. Jones, of 
Raleigh, Rev. Braxton Craig, of Monroe, and Miss Lillian Wil- 
liams of Franklin, Va. 

"Reapers Are Needed" was heartily sung, then the Superin- 
tendent gave her report, which showed that several Societies had 
been organized during the year, but that there were six churches 
in our Association without any mission bands. 

Miss Lillian Williams, of Franklin, Va., spoke earnestly on 
"The Best Investment," giving some of her experiences at the 
Training School and at Chowan College. 

"Are the Boys Worth While? If so. How Shall we Reach 
Them?" was discussed in a very forceful and convincing man- 
ner by Miss Kate Story, of Mt. Tabor. 

The following committees were appointed for the general work 
of the Union: 

Nominations — Mrs. John Freeman, Mrs. R. B. Lineberry, Mrs. 
S. N. Watson, Mrs. Willie Daniel. 

Time and Place — Mrs. E. B. Vaughan, Miss Maggie Speight, 
Miss Sarah Britt. 

Obituaries — Mrs. Mitchell, Mrs. J. J. White, Mrs. G. E. Line- 
berry. 

Resolutions — Mrs. K. D. Stukenbrok, Mrs S. N. Watson, Miss 
Kate Story. 

"Stand Up For Jesus" was sung after which the Union ad- 
journed for dinner, Mrs. W. N. Jones offering the closing prayer. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 29 



Afternoon Session. 

Since several who were on the program could not be present 
on account of the recent heavy rains, the afternoon and evening 
sessions were combined. 

The afternoon session was opened by singing "Come Ye That 
Love the Lord." Devotional exercises were conducted by Miss 
White, of Colerain. 

Rev. Braxton Craig, of Monroe, made a splendid address on 
"Our Great Opportunity and Our Responsibilities." 

In her usual interesting and inspiring way, Mrs. W. N. 
Jones, of Raleigh, talked on "The Practical Things About Our 
Mission Work." She said we are not faithful as members of 
the church unless we are taking an active part in all the mission 
work of the church. 

"Today's Opportunity in Mission Work" — In Foreign Lands, 
in Homeland and in Our State" — was very enthusiastically and 
vividly shown by Mrs. K. D. Stukenbrok, of Jackson. 

The Nominating Committee made the following report: After 
two years of faithful and efficient work, Mrs. R. L. Bolton feels 
that she must give up the work. We extend to her our thanks 
and great appreciation for what she has done, and are sure the 
seed she has sown will bear manifold fruit — thanking her, we 
nominate the following: Superintendent, Mrs. Herbert Jenkins, 
Aulander; Assistant Superintendent, Mrs. John Vann, Winton; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Mary Winborne, Como; Superintendent 
of Junior Work, the President of each county Union. On motion 
this report was adopted. 

Mrs. K. D. Stukenbrok read the following report of the Com- 
mittee on Resolutions: In recognition of the sincere hospitality 
of the memibers of Meherrin Church the Woman's Missionary 
Union of the West Chowan Association wish to express their ap- 
preciation to all who have co-operated in making this such a 
successful and enjoyable occasion. The resolution was adopted 
by a rising vote of the Union. 

The following report of the Obituary Committee was read by 
Mrs. G. E. Lineberry, of Murfreesboro : 

Whereas, God in His infinite wisdom has seen fit to remove 
from earth our sisters, Mrs. T. N. Charles, Union; Mrs. W. D. 
Burden, Aulander; Mrs. White, Askewville; Mrs. Bob Holloman, 
Ahoskie; Mrs. L. L. Taylor, Mt. Carmel; Mrs. J. D. Parker, 
Meherrin; Mrs. C. W. Scarborough, Murfreesboro; Mrs. W. B. 
Pollard, Winton; Mrs. Spieis, Como; Mrs. Ella Butler, Ashley's 
Grove; we, the members of the Woman's Missionary Union of 
the West Chowan Association do humbly submit to His will, 
knowing that He never makes mistakes. 

We extend our sympathy to the Woman's Missionary Societies 
of which they were members, and to their respective families. 

We ask that a copy of this report be put in our record. The 
report was adopted. 



30 



THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 



The Committee on Time and Place announced that the next 
annual meeting would be held at Severn the last Wednesday in 
July, 1917. This report was accepted. 

After all the committees had reported, Rev. T. C. Keaton, of 
Murfreesboro, sang most feelingly "A Starless Crown." 

When the Union had sung a closing hymn it was dismissed with 
prayer by Rev. Braxton Craig. 

MRS. R. L. BOLTON, 

President. 
MRS. HERBERT JENKINS, 

Secretary-Treasurer. 



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CHURCHES AND CONSTITUTIONS. 



Churches. 



Location and Date of Constitution. 



kie 

nder 

;y's Grave 

wville 

lehem 

any 

tley's Grove. 

;horn 

hart's 

ie . 



sr Grove 
ran 



stian Harbor 

•aine 

laritsa 

Icsville 

i&y 



tia 

n's Cross Roads 

•ellsville 

on 

ide 

i' Grove 

Y Springs 

on's 

son 

)rd 

;er 

rence's 

iston 

jarettsville 

i Hill 

srrin 

nt Carmel 

nt Tabor 

freesboro 

ola 

T Hill 

Grove 

Forest 

casi 

isant Grove 

ellsville 

iblican 

Square 

loke 

Jrts' Chapel 



rside ]. 



Hertford County 1804 

Bertie County 1886 

Northampton County 1910 

Bertie County 1913 

Hertford County 1835 

Bertie County 1881 

Hertford County 1877 

Hertford County 1835 

Bertie County 1824 

Bertie County 1770 

Bertie County 1897 

Hertford County 1895 

Hertford Countv 1881 

Bertie County 1780 

Bertie County 1789 

Northampton County 1892 

Northampton County 1905 

Northampton County 1844 

Northmapton County 1859 

Bertie County 1874 

Hertford County 1875 

Northampton County 1856 

Bertie County 1885 

Bertie County I 1804 

Hertford County 190 7 

Hertford County 1915 

Northampton County 1882 

Bertie County 1898 

Northampton County 1900 

Bertie County 1874 

Bertie County 1883 

Northampton County __1880 

Bertie County ' 1854 

Hertford County 1729 

Northampton County 1820 

Hertford County 1839 

Hertford County ' 1843 

Hertford County 1908 

Bertie County 1910 

Hertford County 1894 

Northampton Coiinty ^ 1888 

Northampton County 1808 

Hertford County 183 7 

Bertie County 1911 

Bertie County : ___1803 

Northampton County 1854 

Northampton County 1885 

Northamyjton County 1848 

ertie County 1804 

1913 



ly Run Pertie County 1750 

card 1 Northampton Countv 1889 

I™ Bertie County 1885 

1 Northampton County 1896 

John's Hertford County • 1883 

In 1 Hertford County 1885 

ivon 1 Hertford County 1873 

pand 1 Northampton County ^' 1902 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

WEST CHOWAN 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

HELD WITH 

AHOSKIE BAPTIST CHURCH 
HERTFORD COUNTY 

OCTOBER 30 and 31, 1917 



The next Session to be held with Colerain Church, Bertie County, 
beginning on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October, 1918. 
To preach the sermon, F. B. Raymon. 



RALEIGH 

Mutual Publishing Company, Printers 
1917 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

WEST CHOWAN 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

HELD WITH 

AHOSKIE BAPTIST CHURCH 
HERTFORD COUNTY 

OCTOBER 30 and 31, 1917 



The next Session to be held with Colerain Church, Bertie County, 
beginning on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October; 1918. 
To preach the sermon, F. B. Raymon. 



RALEIGH 

Mutual Publishing Company, Printers 
1917 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS. 

J, R. Mathews Aulander, N. C. 

Dancy Cale Potecasi, N. C. 

C. L. Dowell Ahoskie, N. C. 

S. B. Barnes Merry Hill, N. C. 

C. W. Scarborough Murfreesboro, N. C. 

T. T. Speight Windsor, N. C. 

R. T. White Conway, N. C. 

P. B. Raymond Como, N, C. 

H. H. Honeycutt Ahoskie, N. C. 

M. P. Davis , Aulander, N.C. 

J. F. Cale Roxobel, N. C. 

T. C. Keaton Murfreesboro, N. C. 

S. N. Watson Winton, N. C. 

N. J. Todd Winterville, N. C. 

W. R. Haight Windsor, N. C 

Alexander Miller Jackson, N. C. 

J. W. Downey Woodland, N. C. 

E. P. Sullivan Murfreesboro, N. C. 

R. B. Lineberry Colerain, N. C. 

Jesse Blalock Severn, N. C. 

R. K. White Conway, N. C. 

T. L. Brown Lewiston, N. C. 

G. C. Wilder Tunis, N. .C. 

Jesse P. Colston Conway, n! C. 

W. H. HoUowell Kelford, N. C. 

Paul S. Sykes ~ Conway, N. C, 

OFFICERS. 

*Herman Trueblood Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

C. H. Jenkins, Moderator Aulander, N. C. 

J. P. Cale, Vice-Moderator Roxobel, N. C. 

N. W. Britton, Clerk Winton, N. C. 

W. A. Thomas, Treasurer Cofield, N. C. 

R. B. Lineberry, Historian Colerain, N. C. 

The officers constitute the Executive Committee of the Asso- 
ciation. 

COMMITTEES. 

Missions — C. L. Dowell, J. H. Mathews, P. J. Long, D. R. 
Britton, E. P. Sullivan. 

Christian Education — T. L. Brown, J. S. Jenkins, E. L. Gat- 
ling, A. W. Early, P. B. Raymond. 

Christian Social Service — Mi. P. Davis, John P. Cale, Henry 
Stephenson, Jesse Blalock, Alexander Miller. 

Apportionment Committee — C. W. Scarborough, S. N. Watson, 
R. B. Lineberry, C. W. Mitchell, Dr. Wayland Mitchell, W. L. 
Curtis. 



*Pastor, but not residing in the Association. 



4 



THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION 



CONSTITUTION. 



Name. 

Article 1. This body shall be known as the North Carolina 
West Chowan Baptist Association. 

Membership . 

Art. 2. It shall be composed of messengers elected by the 
churches connected with this body, and all ordained ministers 
who are members or pastors of said churches, together with the 
officers of this Association, and chairmen of all standing com- 
be entitled to two messengers, and for each additional one hun- 
mittees. Eeach church of one hundred members and under shall 
dred members, an additional messenger: Provided, that no 
church shall have more than four messengers. 

Objects. 

Vrt. 3. The objects shall be to devise and recommend meas- 
ures for increasing the harmony, the intelligence and the spirit- 
ual power of the churches, and for developing and directing 
their energies, their resources and their gifts, in advancing the 
Redeemer's Kingdom in the earth. 

Powers and Prerogatives. 

Art. 4. The Association shall have no' power to infringe upon 
the sovereignty or rights of the churches. It is neither an ecclesi- 
astical nor legislative council, nor court of appeal. It may advise 
the churches and recommend measures of usefulness for their 
adoption, but can not bind them in any way. Yet, in view of the 
combined wisdom, piety and intelligence of the body, it may 
justly claim for itself, for its objects and for its recommendation 
the very highest consideration and regard. 

Art. 5. The Association may dissolve connection with any 
church that becomes heterodox in doctrine, or disorderly in 
practice, or that fails to represent itself, either by messenger or 
letter, more than two successive sessions, without sufficient rea- 
sons, or that treats with contempt its objects and requirements, 
or upon application of a church for dismission. 

Rights of Churches. 

Art. 6. Each individual church shall hold and exercise all 
the functions of an independent church of Jesus Christ. As con- 
stituent members of this Association, the churches shall have 
right to advise, when desired, in case of difficulty, and to sug- 
gest plans of usefulness to be adopted. It shall be the undis- 
puted privilege of any church to withdraw its membership from 
this Association whenever it shall so elect. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 5 



Duties of Churches. 

Art 7. It shall be the duty of the churches to appoint as 
messengers, as far as practicable, their most capable members, 
to require their attendance, and to send by them a contribution 
to the Association fund to pay for printing the minutes and other 
necessary expenses. 

Art. 8. It shall be the duty of each church to send an annual 
letter to the Association, giving: (1) locality; (2) names of 
its pastor and clerk and their respective postoffices; (3) the 
Sabbaths of regular service; (4) the church statistics, including 
the number baptized, received by letter, restored, dismissed, de- 
ceased, expelled, and aggregate membership, male and female; 
(5) Sabbath school statistics; (6) amount contributed to benevo- 
lent objects and the Association fund; (7) names of messengers 
and alternates; (8) any other information deemed of special 
importance. 

Organization. 

Art. 9. The officers of this Association shall be a Moderator, 
Vice-Moderator, Clerk, Treasurer, and Historian, who shall be 
elected at each annual session, from the members of the Asso- 
ciation, and shall continue in office until the next annual elec- 
tion, which election shall be the next order of business after the 
enrollment of messengers. As soon as the new officers shall have 
taken their seats, the body shall be declared organized and pre- 
pared for business. 

Art. 10. In order to conserve time and not intefere with the 
main work of the body, this Association will not consider any 
routine or miscellaneous business except at the close of the dis- 
cussion of each general topic. 

Duties of Officers. 

Art. 11. It shall be the duty of the Moderator to open the 
meetings punctually at time appointed; to enforce the rules; to 
preserve order, and to exercise all the prerogatives of a presiding 
officer, according to the principles of parliamentary usage. 

Art. 12. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Moderator to dis- 
charge the duties of the Moderator in his absence. 

Art. 13. It shall be the duty of the Clerk to keep a faithful 
record of the proceedings of the body, and superintend the 
printing and distribution of same, and to keep on file the printed 
Minutes and other important documents belonging to the body. 
He may appoint an assistant when necessary. 

Art. 14. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive and 
disburse the money contributed to the Minute Fund, as directed 
by the body, and make an annual report of same. 

Art. 15. It shall be the duty of the Historian, who shall be 
j elected at eatih annual meeting of the body, to prepare for pub- 
lication in the Minutes an historical sketch of the church with 
which the Association meets, with obituaries, incidents, and other 



6 THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION 

facts of the year that should be preserved, and make report to 
the next Association. 

Art. 16. This Constitution may be altered at any annual ses- 
sion of the body by a vote of two-thirds of the members present. 

Resolutions. 




Resolved (1) That no church shall be entitled to representa- 
tion in this body unless in perfect accord with the Constitution 
thereof, that fact to be ascertained by a committee of five on cre- 
dentials, appointed at each session of the body immediately after 
organization; (2) the report of this committee shall be the prop- 
erty of the Association just as any other report. (Adopted 1898.) 

Resolved (2) That henceforth this Association withdraw fel- 
lowship from any church that allows its members to engage in 
the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors as a beverage. 
(1891.) 

Resolved (3) That it is the sense of this Association that sell- 
ing intoxicating liquors through a dispensary is a violation of 
the spirit and letter of the resolution of our Constitution. (1905.) 



RULES OF ORDER. 

1. The Association shall convene annually at the time and 
place of its own adjournment. 

2. During each annual session it shall meet and adjourn from 
day to day at the hours fixed upon by the body. 

3. All meetings of the Association shall be opened and closed 
with religious exercises. 

4. A majority of the members present shall be a quorum for 
the transaction of business. 

5. No member shall absent himself temporarily without 
leave of the Moderator, nor finally without leave of the body. 

6. No member shall speak more than twice on the same sub- 
ject without permission of the body. 

7. No member shall be allowed to talk, stand up, read or 
move about the house during business, except to gain or impart 
information under consideration. 

8. No committee shall be in session during the hour of busi- 
ness without permission from the body. 

9. All questions of order not herein provided shall be decided 
by Mell's Parliamentary Practice. 



WESr CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7^ 



LIST OF DELEGATES. 

Ahoskie — Robert Holloman, A. G. Bazemore, C. C. Hoggard. 
Aulander — W. J. Dunning, C. W. Mitchell, D. N. Green, Fer* 
ris Hoggard. 

Ashley's Grove — C. R. Revelle, E. L. Parker, L. F. Liverman. 
Askewville — W. G. White, Webster White. 
Bethlehem — A. B. Cowan, W. A. Perry, W. A. Thomas. 
Bethel — Eddie Edwards, M. L. Daniel. 
Bethany — O. N. Daniel, J. D. Evans, H. L. Perry. 
Brantley's Grove — W. P. Willoughby, G. T. Hoggard. 
Buckhorn — S. P. Winborne, G. C. Picot, H. J. Vann. 
Capehart's — W. L. Baker, H. J. Ward, John T. White. 
Cashie — T. Gillam, E. L. Catling, G. C. White, J. H. Mathews. 
Center Grove — C. S. Godwin, J. D. Jenkins, B. W. Holloman. 
Christian Harbor — N. S. Hoggard, H. Pettijohn, F. P. Britt. 
Colerain — E. White, D. R. Britton, E. J. Baker, O. B. Hughes. 
Connaritsa — J. H. Hall, J. P. Morris, J. L. Jenkins, W. S. 
Askew. 

Conway — J. E. Gillam, B, F. Martin, Loyd Hicks. 
Creekville — C. W. Bridgers, S. H. Boone, F. L. Bridgers. 
Farley's Grove — L. R. Liverman, A. R. Benthall. 
Elam — F. J. Bass, R. F. Barnes, J. L. Taylor. 
Galatia — R. J. Britton, B. C. Gay, D. W. Taylor. 
Green's X Roads — D. W. Castellow, John M. Mizelle, J. A. 
White. 

Harrellsville — W. E. Miller, R. G. Baker. 

Hebron — H. T. Vaijn, W. E. Futrell, J. L. Futrell. 

Hillside — F. H. Harden, W. E. Saunders. 

IJolly Grove — P. A. Harmon, J. J. Tayloe. 

Holly Springs— W. P. McGlohon, Roland Hill. 

Horton's — H. W. Green, N. P. Odom. 

Jackson — L. L. Taylor, Scott Cox. 

IKelford— W. C. Evans, J. B. Smith, Reubin Harrell. 
Lasker — W. R. Bridgers, B. G. Bridgers. 
Lawrence's — J. W. Langdale, J. R. Phelps, W. M. Keeter. 
Lewiston — W. H. Taylor, W. Mitchell, R. L. Lodge. 
Margarettsville — J. G. Stancell, B. H. Lanier. 
Mars Hill — J. T. Harrell, C. S. Pierce, Andrew Miller, H. H. 
Mizell. 

Meherrin — J. K. Parker, L. T. Garris, Charlie Simons. 

Mt. Carmel — H. P. Spencer, G. T. Clark, J. T. Pruden. 

Mt. Tabor — J. D. Sewell, Oris Mathews, W. P. Catling. 

Murfreesboro — W. E. Jenkins, J. D. Babb, C. E. Boyette. 

Menola — J. F. Cowan, J. M. Eley. 

Merry Hill — T. E. White, Bruce White, S. A. Adams. 

Oak Grove — J. F. Holloman, W. E. Marsh. 

Pine Forest — L. A. Jordan, W. H. Camp. 

Potecasi — C. T. Sumner, J. R. Baugham, A. L. Lassiter. 

Pleasant Grove — W. A. Cook, C. F. Jenkins, T. W. Askew. 

Powellsville — T. W. Holloman, Josiah Brown. 



8 



THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION 



Republican — J. G. Ward, L. T. Bazemore, A. V. Cobb, T. A. 
White. 

Rich Square — J. P. Holloman, J. T. Bolton, James Allen. 
Roanoke — J. H. Braswell, M. T. Martin. 

Robert's Chapel — L. A. Stephenson, D. N. Stephenson, J. C. 
Taylor. 

Ross's — W. R. Butler, W. S. Hoggard, G. C. Castellow, J. L. 
Morris. 

Riverside — Wm. T. Williams, C. C. Holder. 
Sandy Run — A. W. Early, J. M. Jacobs, E. L. Bishop, W. R. 
Smith. 

Seaboard — C. P. Stephenson, J. M. S. Rogers. 

Siloam — N. T. Leggett, G. D. Leggett. 

Severn — J. J. White, W. H. Howell, John Maddrey. 

St. John's— W. P. Howard, R. L. Edwards. 

Union — J. A. Copeland, W. A. Mills. 

Winton — W. S. Herring, J. J. Piland, J. E. Vann. 

Woodland — G. M. Holloman, C. H. Griffin, C. G. Parker. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



9 




ORDER OF BUSINESS. 



First Day. 



10: 


:00 


a. 


m.- 


— Devotional Exercises — W. 


R. Haight. 




10: 


:30 


a. 


m,- 


— Enroll Messengers, Organize, Invite Visitors, 


Call 










Names of Churches That 


Failed to Report 


Last 










Year, Receive New Churches, Appoint Commit- 










tees. 






11: 


:00 


a. 


m.- 


— Biblical Recorder, 






11: 


:30 


a. 


m.- 


— Christian Social Service 
Ministers' Relief. 


(1) Orphanage; 


(2) 


12: 


:45 


p. 


m.- 


— Recess. 






2 


:00 


p.m — 


-Christian Education — (1) 


Sunday-schools ; 


(2) 










Ccileges and Schools, (3) 


Ministerial Education. 


3: 


;45 


P- 


m.- 


— Assignment of Homes. 
. Adjournment. 






7: 


:00 


p. 


m.- 


— Praise Service. 






7; 


:30 


p. 


m.- 


— Introductory Sermon. 






,8; 


:30 


P- 


m.- 


— Miscellaneous Business. 
Adjournment. 

Second Day. 






9: 


:30 


a. 


m.- 


— Devotional Exercises — G. E. Lineberry. 




10: 


:00 


a. 


m.- 


— Report on Church Statistics. 




10 


:15 


a. 


m.- 


— MiscellanSiOus Business. 






10 


:45 


a. 


m.- 


— Missions — (1) State Missions; (2) Home 


Mis- 










sions; (3) Foreign Missions 


; (4) Woman's Work. 


12: 


:30 


p. 


m.- 


— Recess. 






2: 


:00 


p. 


m.- 


— Missions Continued. 






3: 


:15 


p. 


m,- 


— Report of Apportionment 


Committtee. 




3: 


:30 


p. 


m.- 


—Miscellaneous Business. 







Adjournment. 

JOHN F. CALE, Committee. 



lO' THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION 

HISTORIAN'S REPORT. I 
Buildings and Furnishings. 

Mars Hill Church paid, during the year, a balance of $1,000 on 
the pastor's home. Askewville dedicated their new house of wor- 
ship with no encumbrance. Merry Hill paid off a debt of $400 on 
house of worship and dedicated the same. Cashie finished paying 
for their house of worship and dedicated. Capehart's people are 
building a new house of worship — $3,500 has been subscribed for 
it. Colerain installed acetylene lights at a cost of $3 40. 

Pastoral Changes. 

Rev. C. L. Dowell has resigned at Ahoskie and flev. C. W. Scar- 
borough resigned at Mt. Tabor. Bach of these churches will like- 
ly take full time preaching. Rev. K. D. Stukenbrok has resigned 
the Jackson field and Rev. Alexander Miller has taken this pasto- 
rate. Rev. N. J. Todd is supply pastor at Sandy Run. Rev. W. 
H. Hollowell is pastor at Kelford, Ross' and Bethany — the last 
two have now twice a month preaching — one morning and after- 
noon each. . Chowan and Winton churches united and Chowan 
name is dropped from the roll. Meherrin has gone to full time 
preaching. Rev. P. B. Raymond is pastor of Buckhorne, Hebron 
and Menola. Rev. L. E. Dailey moved from our Association to 
the Robeson Association. Harrellsville and Christian Harbor now 
have preaching twice a month — one morning and one afternoon 
each. 

Mars Hill lost by death Mrs. Pearce, widow of Deacon SamueJ 
Pearce; Mrs. E. J. Miller, Brother W. W. Outlaw, and in a tragic 
death by boiler explosion Brother John Newsome. Capeharts 
mourns the loss of Deacon Bowen and Sister Bowen. Merry Hil) 
lost by death D. P. Lawrence, reputed to be one of the best men 
in Bertie County. Colerain lost by death three sisters of rare 
gifts in church service: Mrs. H. E. Wilson, wife of Deacon Wilson; 
Mrs. C. E. Outlaw, and Mrs. MoUie Britton, widow of the late 
Daniel Britton. This church also lost in the death of Judson 
Evans, J. M. Askew and Mrs. Harriet Ann Perry, Mrs. Eula Mil- 
ler, Mrs. Estella Wynns and Mrs. Essie Ward. 

John C. Burden was born August the 12th, 1891, and died June 
10th, 1917. He was a young man of clean life and noble and 
high in purpose, honored and loved by all who knew him. At his 
death he was Superintendent of the Aulander Baptist Sunday- 
school, and was an enthusiastic worker. Why he should be called 
when his life promised to be so useful to the Kingdom of (ioa, 
is one of the mysteries that must wait the time when all things 
must be revealed. 

Ahoskie Church. 

Ahoskie Baptist Church, from which the town took its name, 
is situated' on the east of the Atlantic Coast Line Railway, just 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 11 



outside the corporate limits of the town of Ahoskie in Hertford 
County, N. C. 

Organized in the year 1804, and Rev. Geo. Williams is sup- 
posed to have been its first pastor. The records of the church from 
the time of its organization until just after the Civil War have 
been lost. It was rebuilt about the year 1870 and remodeled to 
its present capacity in 19 09 under the leadership of Rev. ivi. A. 
Adams. 

Among the preachers who have served Ahoskie Church are 
numbered John Nowell, B. B. Williams, J. C. M. Luke, John Mit- 
chell, R. R. Savage and L. M. Curtis. All of these saints have long: 
since passed to their reward. It now has a membership of 45 
under the leadership of Brother C. L. Dowell, who has faithfully 
served it during the past seven years. Having found the churcn. 
heavily in debt from the repairs of the year before. Brother Doweii 
is serving now a church free from indebtedness and one that pays 
as it goes. 



PROCEEDINGS 



Ahoskie, K C, October SOth, 1917. 

The West Chowan Baptist Association met this day in 
its thirty-fifth annual session with the Ahoskie Baptist 
Church, Herford County. 

The devotional exercises were conducted by W. E. Haight, 
after which C. H. Jenkins, the Moderator, called the As- 
sociation to order. 

On account of the severe storm which delayed many of the 
delegates from reaching the church on time, on motion, it 
was ordered that those present constitute a quorum, and the 
Association proceed to business. 

On motion, the roll call was postponed until Wednesday 
morning. 

The Association organized by electing C. H. Jenkins Mod- 
erator; J. F. Cale, Vice-Moderator; IST. W. Britton, Clerk; 
W. A. Thomas, Treasurer, and R. B. Lineberry, Historian. 

The Moderator extended a welcome to the following vis- 
iting brethren : E. L. Middleton, A. Johnson, G. E. Spruill, 
D. S. Dempsy, J. S. Farmer, W. L. Poteat, Gilbert Steph- 
enson, Chaffin, 'N. M. Wright. Alexander 

Miller, F. B. Raymond, and W. H. Hollowell are new pas- 
tors in the Association. 

The hour for considering the Biblical Recorder having ar- 
rived, in the absense of Editor L. Johnson, R. B. Lineberry 
was requested to represent the Recorder, which he did in a 
fitting way. J. S. Farmer, arriving later spoke in the inter- 
est of the Recorder. 

The report on Missions — (1) State Missions, (2) Home 
Missions, (3) Foreign Missions, (4) Woman's Work — ^was 
presented by R. B. Lineberry. 

REPORT ON MISSIONS. 

We believe in missions, because Jesus Christ taught and 
praticed missions with Himself and His disciples. We believe we 
should carry the good-tidings to others, because Jesus com- 
manded us to do so; because the Holy Spirit puts into our 
hearts, when regenerated, the desire to dp so; because God 
blesses us in the efforts we put forth fo win the world for 
Him — blesses us in the happiness of our own life, in the sue- 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



13 



cess He gives us in winning others and in the rapidly enlarging 
opportunities He throws in our way. 

We practice pur belief so little because we allow the devil 
to fill us so full of selfishness that we forget God; because we 
have neglected to inform ourselves of the need pf a sinful 
world and of the obligation God's love lays upon us, and be- 
cause, listening to the devil, living in ignorance and neglecting 
known duty our hearts grow cold. 

Let us bear in mind that by missons we mean carrying the 
gospel to those who have it not, both near and afar. God's 
plan starts us in our community, through our State, over our 
country to the ends of the world. For convenience in doing 
our work, we divide it into State, Home and Foreign Missions. 
To us State Missions is missionary work done in North Carolina, 
Home Missions is our missionary efforts in the bounds of the 
Southern Baptist Convention, in Cuba, and Panama. Foreign 
Mission work is that we do in foreign countries. 

State Missions. 

Through State Mission workers last year 319 churches were 
served, 11,568 sermons preached, 2211 baptized, 7 churches or- 
ganized, 11 houses of work finished, 41 more building. Money 
raised for benevolence on State Mission fields, $17,353.30 and to 
other objects, $15,446.88. Through our churches we raised for 
State Missions last year $54,853.50" of which the West Chowan 
Association paid $3,644.40. This year we ate expected to raise 
in the State $47,500 exclusive of Associational Missions and 

Sunday School Missions. The West Chowan has paid 

The Board urges that we inform our men through mission 
study classes. Regular giving is also stressed. For these two 
things we might watch the women with interest and profit. A 
very important advance step of the State Mission Board is a 
system of bookkeeping from, which can be known at any time 
just how much each church has contributed. Your committea 
thinks that we should put forth a greater effort for State Mis- 
sions just now than ever before. Make our State Christian 
so when our boys go to the war they shall go away Christians, 
have our citizenship so thoroughly Christian that they will 
daily pray for the boys while they are away and when the war 
is over be ready for whatever opportunities God has for us. 

Home Missions. 

Our Home Mission Board is located in Atlanta, Ga., Dr. B. 
D. Gray being Secretary. This Board for the year ending May, 
1917, had paid its current expenses and reduced a debt of 
$72,308.00 to $38,185.00. This was done while special effort 
was put forth to pay off the Foreign Mission debt. The Board 
did its work last year with an administrative expense of 4.7 
per cent. 

This Board under direction of the Southern Baptist Conven- 



14 



THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION 



tion is striving to complete the Million Dollar Churcli 
Building Loan Fund. Who can estimate the value of this fund 
to Southern Baptists when it shall he secured? The Board 
last year had 1507 workers who delivered 169,578 sermons 
and addresses. It maintained 36 schools in which were taught 
5704 pupils, 117 of them being ministerial students. Through 
the Board's workers there were 37,724 baptisms. A total ad- 
dition to the churches through their work of 6 0,202. There 
were 216 churches constitutg'd, 431 houses of worship built and 
improved, 563 Sunday-schools organized. We quote from the 
Home Board's report on Enlistment: "We make bold to say that 
the supreme task of Southern Baptists is the proper enlist- 
ment and training and use of this vast force converting it into 
an army of conquest for Christ. We are impotent everywhere 
just as we are weak here. Religiously America holds the key 
as she does in the great world war." 

Foreign Missions. 

The Foreign Mission Board is located in Richmond, Va., Dr. 
J. F. Love is the Secretary. The total receipts last year were 
$517,323.00 of which North Carolina paid $51,148.00 and the 
West Chowan Association was credited with $4,994, but some 
of this was on the Judson Centennial and $600 extra to Miss 
Johnson's salary, besides what was raised on the Foreign Mis- 
sion debt. 

We still have the seven main foreign fields: Africa, Argentina, 
Brazil, Japan, China, Italy, Mexico. Last year the Board reported 
that there were 458 churches on these fields with a membership, 
of 47,161. The native contributions were $132,371. There were 
6,347 baptisms. We have 307 foreign missionaries and 809 
native workers. We have 474 schools with 12,930 students. 
Our fifteen medical missionaries treated 67,556 patients. 

The urgent need at present is 2 9 evangelistic families, 7 
women evangelists, 6 doctors, 7 trained nurses, 20 school men, 
15 school women, 3 kindergartners, 1 for Sunday-school train- 
ing and 1 business manager. Counting two to the family for 
married missionaries this makes a need of 147 men and women. 

Women's Work. 

Who can write a report of Woman's Work? They can not 
lay a plan big enough for themselves. Even a prophet is be- 
wildered. Last year they contiibuted $501,812.70. North 
Carolina women promised to raise $49,000 of this and they 
came up with $59,000. Of this amount the West Chowan under- 
took to raise $3,600, and they came out with $3,941.75, lacking 
only $12 of being up with the Central Association, which led 
in the State. This year the women of the West Chowan Associa- 
tion have taken $5,000 for their aim. The women of the Southern 
Baptist Convention have taken $325,000, as their task toward 
the million dollar Home Mission Church Building Loan Fund. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



15 



Here are some things which men could well afford to emulate: 
They have mission study classes and learn to know the needs 
of the world; they have a prayer calendar and put this matter 
on their hearts; they give systematically and regularly. The 
consecration of their members is the happy resultant. All 
the women need is that the men shall let them do what their 
hearts prompt them to do. In closing we would call attention 
to the women's work In training the boys and girls and chil- 
dren. For the future Kingdom interest this will be, no doubt, 
the most telling. 

R. B. LINEBERRY, For Committee. 

This report was spoken to by R. B. Lineberry, S. A. Ives, 
W. R. Haight, M. P. Davis, and A. Johnson. 

The Association adjourned for dinner, J. F. Cale pro- 
nouncing the benediction. 

AFTERI^OON SESSIOK 

The Association re-assembled at about 2 o'clock, and was 
led in prayer by E. L. Middleton. 

On motion, E. L. Middleton was given the time which W. 
'N. Johnson was expected to use, in discussing State Mis- 
sions, to speak on Sunday-schools as part of our missionary 
work. 

At this point, C. W. Mitchell spoke fittingly of the life 
and work of J. C. Scarborough, who is now suffering under 
the hand of affliction. On motion, a collection of $159.98 
was taken. The Association offered prayer for Brother 
Scarborough and wife, led by their pastor, T. C. Keaton. 
Later on in the session, on motion of C. L. Dowell, a com- 
mittee v/as appointed to look after the needs of Mr. and Mrs. 
Scarborough and to call upon the churches of the Asso- 
ciation for such help as may be needed, the committee be- 
ing C. W. Mitchell, J. H. Mathews, ^sT. W. Britton, T. C. 
Keaton and W. L. Curtis. Mrs. Scarborough being present 
requested that prayer again be offered for her and her hus- 
band. A. Johnson was requested to lead in this prayer for 
this highly esteemed brother and sister. 

The Committee on Hospitality now assigned homes to 
the delegates. 

The Association adjourned with prayer by C. W. Scar- 
borough. 



16 THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION 

EVENING SESSION. 

After a short and interesting song service, T. C. Keaton 
preached the Associational sermon from I Cor. :22. 

The remainder of the evening session was used in discuss- 
'ing Food Conservation, participated _ in by C. H. Jenkins, 
A. Johnson, and D. Cale. J. E. Cale was appointed to pre- 
pare and present to the body later for adoption suitable reso- 
lutions on the matter of saving food, which is so vital at the 
present time. The Association adjourned with the benedic- 
tion by W. K. Haight. 

WEDNESDAY— MOENING SESSION. 

The devotional exercises was conducted by J. W. Downey. 
At this time the Statistical and Einancial Keport was made 
and adopted. 

DIGEST OF CHURCH LTETTERS. 



Received. 

By baptism 435 

By letter 312 

By restoration 348 

Loss. 

By letter , 367 

By exclusion 147 

By death 109 

Total membership. 12,897 

Expenses for Home Purposes. 

Pastor's salaries $ 18,077.00 

Buildings and repairs 17,846.91 

Poor 747.34 

Incidentals 4,198.49 

Sunday-school expenses 2,303.75 

Minute Fund 128.36 

Contributions. 

Associational Missions $ 18.00 

State Missions 4,154.60 

Home Missions 3,311.79 

Foreign Missions 4,356.24 

Sunday School Missions 220.67 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



17 



Orphanage 

Ministers' Relief. . . . 
Ministerial Education 
Colleges and schools. 
Other objects 



7,457.97 
361.37 
992.12 
345.77 

3,535.18 



Total 



$71,750.48 



The Moderator appointed the following committee on thft 
admission of new churches : M. P. Davis, T. C. Keaton, and 
C. W. Scarborough. The committee later recommended the 
admission of Bethel Baptist Church and Earley's Grove 
Baptist Church to membership in this body, which, on mo- 
tioTi war done, the Moderator extending the hand of welcome 
to the delegates of these churches. 

G. E. Lineberry read the Keport on Christian Education. 



We are glad to note that of the fifty-eight churches composing 
the West Chowan Association, last year fifty-seven of them rer 
ported Sunday-schools with ten branch schools, making in all 
sixty-seven schools. We find no report from Hillside Church, but 
hope that by this time they have organized a Sunday-school. Last 
year our report showed 13,43 8 church members; Sunday-school 
enrollment, 8,2 80. While this shows a Sunday-school enrollment 
of sixtyrone to every one hundred church members, yet a good 
per cent of these are children and non-church members. So we 
can easily see many of our church members are not in any way 
identified with our Sunday-school work. 

One of the great needs of our Sunday-school today is better 
trained teachers. While it has only been in the last few years 
that especiol attention has been given to this, we are glad to 
note that North Carolina is one of the leading States in this 
work. 

A new style of architecture is being developed for our 
churches. We must have proper houses, equipment and efficient 
consecrated workers, in order to carry out the great commission 
of our Lord and Master. 

There are two aims ever before us in this work, one to 1:'each 
the unsaved who have passed the age of accountability and 
?]«ring them into that new relation with our Lord and Master 
which means for them "Life more abundant." We have, as Mis- 
sionary Baptists, never yet realized the great importance of train- 
ing children, and the great opportunity afforded us in training 
them, not into the kingdom, but training them so their little 
hearts will be tender, their ears acute to hear the voice of the 



REPPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION. 



I. Sunday-schools. 



18 THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION | 

Master so that when they have reached the age of accountability 
they will quickly respond and surrender their lives to the one 
who alone is able to save. 

Not only do we need evangelization in our Sunday-schools, but 
we need to train the saved. We are glad to report that certain 
days are set apart for the presentation of each benevolent ob- 
ject fostered by our denomination, and last year our Sunday- 
schools contributed for these various objects $50,000. We would 
give our hearty endorsement to the faithful work done by E. Li. 
Middleton, and H. B. Vann in holding institutes and Sunday- 
school rallies. We would recommend that the association plan 
at once for three things: 

1st. A religious census in every church which will embrace 
the entire territory covered by this Association. 

2nd. The enlistment in home departments of all our church 
members who can not, or who will not, attend the active sessions 
of our Sunday-schools. 

3rd. That our organized classes be encouraged and drawn 
into closer relationship, so that they may heartily co-operate witn » 
the new secretary appointed by our Southern Baptist Convention 
to foster, encourage and organize classes for our young people. 

II. Education. 

The great opportunity and possibility presentea in Christian 
Education is dawning upon the leaders of our denomination to- 
day, and great movements are being planned, in the early ages, 
parental training aided by the schools of the prophets made the 
foundation for consecrated citizenship and trained leaders. 

The world has seemed, in its modern tendencies, to drift awaiy 
from the ideas of some of the saints of old, and from the teach- 
ing of our Savior while on earth, and our attention has been 
turned more toward a brain training without a heart training, a 
bread winning or selfi-indulgent education. This has gone on un- 
til even nations have seemingly trained millions of their citizen- 
ship to believe that might makes right without any consideration 
for truth, honor, justice, or even a vestige of humanity which 
should be found in civilized countries. Today the crowning cli- 
max to this false conception and training is upon us in the great- 
est war of all history. Money is spent by billions, and lives are 
being sacrificed not only by hundreds, but by thousands and mil- 
lions. Misery and want stalk abroad in the noonday, and prey 
upon millions of helpless women and children, and the end is not 
yet. 

Our denomination is challenging the right of our young people 
to know something better, higher and nobler in life. In its three 
standard colleges, Wake Forest, established in 1835, Chowan m 
1848, Meredith in 1900, and 15 High Schools, they are offering 
the opportunity to our boys and girls; the opportunity in the 
bloom of youth, the formative period of life, the days when Indi^ 
vidual and soul destinies are determined, to be trained for the 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



19 



fullest possible life. In buildings, equipment, and endowment we 
have invested $1,499,993.00. We have also joined with the 
Southern Baptist Convention in putting at Louisville, Ky., for the 
Seminary and Training School an investment of $1,139, 000. OQ. In 
this State last year we employed 191 teachers, and there were en- 
rolled 3,634 students. In the;^e are being trained, not alone those 
who are to carry the Good News to the lost nations of the earth, 
and be engaged in the public walks of life in our own land, but 
those who, as laymen, are to be the pillars of our churches, ever 
loyal to the truth, and consecrating their lives and their possesr 
sions to their Lord and Master. In these, are to De found the 
Hannah's, Elizabeth's, Martha's and Mary's who in public, by 
their influence, lead safely the souls about them. These faithful 
women, not a few, are the polished corner stones, these who on 
foreign fields and mission work at home are largely supporting the 
Kingdom, and with the Royal Ambassadors and Sunbeams are 
making beautiful the paths for our unsurpecting little ones. It 
is these who, around their hearth stone are training and dedicat- 
ing to the Master's service the future Samuels and John the Bap- 
tists. 

III. Ministerial Education. 

There are 84 ministerial students at Wake Forest this year, (58 
of whom are aided by our Education Board. Our Board is also 
extending similar help at Chowan and Meredith to girls who have 
decided to be missionaries, but we do not know the full number 
being aided this year. Five were aided last year. Last year 
there were 3 3 North Carolina boys registered at our Seminary at 
Louisville, 2 of these were aided by the Board. For the first 
time in years our contributions to that object were greater than 
the amount spent on our North Carolina boys, as we paid $1,560 
and the amount expended were $1,533. More than 10 per cent 
of the students there last year were from North Carolina. Some- 
how God has seen fit in His wisdom to call very few wealthy 
young men to preach the gospel, and very few rich young women 
to go to the mission fields. Hence He has given to us the oppor- 
tunity, yea, the glorious privilege of aiding these young men ana 
women to suitably prepare themselves for the great work before 
them. 

We would recommend that our Association keep ud its appor- 
tionment to Education of two-fifths the amounts given to State 
Missions, and pledge our loyal support in the great movement bal- 
ing planned to raise a million dollars to better equip and 
strengthen our institutions. We would also urge upon our people 
the supreme importance of sending their boys and girls to our 
institutions, where they will not only receive the best possible 
training, but will be under the safest Christian influence. In view 
of the great world opportunities just before us and the impending 
dangers which thicken about us, as wealth accumulates and 
pleasures multiply, we pray divine guidance for our Boards of 



20 



THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION 



Trustees who have in charge these institutions for moulding and 
shaping life, that they may select, not only the best grade of in- 
structors intelectually, but spiritually, as well remembering 
that God is looking to them to take care of these young lives in 
their supreme hour of need. 

G. E. LINEBERRY, 

C. W. SCARBOROUGH. 

C. W. MITCHELL. 

Remarks on this report were made by E. F. Sullivan, IvT. 
W. Britton, C. W. Scarborough, and C. L, Dowell. Dr. W. 
L. Poteat being present addressed the Association on this 
subject, after which the report was adopted. 

The following resolution on Food Conservation was pre- 
sented by J. J. Cale, and adopted. 

Whereas, there is a distressing shortage of food stuffs caused 
by under-production, over consumption, devastation and waste, 
as a result of the world war now in progress into which our 
own nation has been precipitated; and whereas, it appears that 
food under God's will win this war for us and our allies, and 
therefore President Wilson has created a Food Conservation 
Commission; and whereas; we wish to show our patriotism by 
pledging to the administration at Washington our loyalty and 
co-operation; therefore be it, 

Resolved: That the West Chowan Association representing a 
membership of thirteen thousand in session, this the 31st of 
October, 1917, by a rising vote pledge to our government its 
enthusiastic and patriotic support in the matter of Food Con- 
servation. 

The Clerk of the Association was instructed to inform 
Mr. H. C. Hoover, Food Administrator, of the above action. 

The Association adjourned with the benediction by F. B. 
Raymond. 

WEDI^ESDAY— AFTER]\TOO]Sr SESSIOK 

The Association re-assembled at 2 o'clock and was led in 
prayer by Gilbert Stephenson. 

The followinj? resolution was adopted: 

That W. R. Haight, Jesse Blalock, and E. F. Sullivan 1)8 

appointed a committee to co-operate with the pastors and Sun- 
day-school superintendents of the Association to carry out the 
suggestions in the Report on Sunday Schools, to take religious 
census, enlist all church members in Sunday-school work, and to 
organize young people's classes. 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



21 



J. W. Downey, Associational delegate, to the last session 
of the Southern Baptist Convention, reported a splendid 
meeting of that- body, and thanked the Association for fur- 
nishing means to defray his expenses. 

The Report on Social Service was presented by W. H. 
Haight, and was discussed by J. W. Downey, A. Johnson, 
H. J. Vann, and was adopted. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN SOCIAL SERVICE. 

By the grouping of our work in the West Chowan Association, 
two departments of our organized effort come under the head ol 
Christian Social Service, namely: The Orphanage, and Ministerial 
Relief. 

1. The Thoniasville Orphanage. 

On November 11th, 1885, the first child was received. The las t 
one enrolled this year runs the number up to 1,79 6. There are 
now present, 505 in fourteen familits. There ar< 50 applicants 
a month, most of whom are turned away for lack of room It 
costs about $127.75 a year to support one chili, not including 
building and repairs. Children are received betv/een the ages of 
two and twelve, and are dismissed according to preparation rather 
than age. 

The expense bill averages over $176.75 a day, — two barrels of 
flour a day, three or four bushels of meal, a whole beef when 
used all around, ten bushels of sweet potatoes when potatoes are 
used, and other things accordingly. 

The school work is on the graded system, and embraces ten 
grades. The children go to school half the day, and work the 
other half. 

There are thirty-three women, and* eleven men who devote all 
their time to the institution. 

The Kennedy Home is situated in Lenoir County, six miles from 
Kinston. Two dormitories have been built there and fifty chil- 
dren occupy them. The most urgent need of the Kennedy Home 
is a suitable chapel for religious services. 

One hundred and seventy-five acres of the farm are in cultiva- 
tion. A large part of it is devoted to trucking and raising feed 
for the cattle. The boys do a large part of the work. 

About 60 pairs of shoes are turned out from the shoe shop an- 
nually. 

Our churches are magnifying Thanksgiving Day as Orphanage 
Day. The effort now is to make that thank-offering equal to one 
day's work, or one day's income — the "One Day for the Orphan- 
age" thank-offering. It is suggested that in many country 
churches it is best to select a Sunday nearest Thanksgiving Day 
to hold this special service. This great offering gives the extra 
impetus as the winter months are entered upon. 



22 



THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION 



Charity and Children, as its organ, is the right arm of the in- 
stitution. Twelve boys are employed in the job department for 
half the time. Only about one-third of our Baptist Sundayr- 
schools take this paper in clubs. There ought to be a club in 
every Sunday-school in the State. Those v^^ho take the paper in 
single subscriptions contribute more to the Orphanage than those 
who get it in clubs. Price $1.00 a year, or in clubs of ten or more 
to one address, 60 cents a year. 

The sewing room keeps about twenty girls in the morning and 
a like number in the afternoon. They learn to make their own 
clothes. 

The laundry force consists of about forty girls, twenty of these 
on duty in the forenoon and twenty in the afternoon. Some 8,000 
pieces are handled each week. 

Eighteen men, ratified by the Baptist State Convention, com- 
pose the Board of Trustees. These men who are busy with their 
own private affairs make the sacrifice of time and money to at- 
tend the meetings of the Board, without a penny of remunera^ 
tion. 

There are 2,000 Sunday-schools in the State. About 4u per cent 
of the current fund comes from once a month collections from 
about oner-third of these schools. 

Our Association gave this year $7,228.87, an increase of more 
than $1,555.24 over last year. 

We recommend that all the churches make once a month offer- 
ings from their Sunday-schools; that they plan for the "One Day 
for the Orphanage ' Thanksgiving Offering on Thanksgiving Day, 
or on a Sunday nearest that day; and that every Sunday-school 
in the Association secure clubs for Charity and Children. 

II. Ministers' Relief. 

It has been said that lawyers have their "starvation period ' at 
the beginning of their career; but preachers have their "starva- 
tion period" at the end of their career. If it were not for the 
work of the Ministers' Relief Board, the last days of many a faith- 
ful minister would be a starvation period indeed. 

Small salaries, large giving out of meagre incomes, the cost of 
frequent moving, a willingness to labor in the destitute places of 
the earth, limited education, affliction, and the "dead line" of age, 
are some of the reasons why there are ministers among us who 
are in need of financial help. The preacher must give his whole 
time to the work of the ministry today or lose his hold upoti the 
people. Besides, he himself finds it impossible to serve two mas<- 
ters. He has no chance to lay by anything for a rainy day, so 
that when he is incapacitated for service he sometimes has to look 
to the churches for help. 

There is a growing sentiment abroad that we should plan larger 
things in the direction of helping our old ministers, either by en- 
dowment or otherwise. 

It is the purpose of this Board to extend aid to every aged or 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



23 



afflicted minister who is in want, or whose poverty is the result 
of a life given to preaching the gospel. During 25 years of the 
Board's exstence about 12 5 needy ministers have received aid 
There are at present 3 6 beneficiaries. 

This Association this year has given to the work of the Board 
$353.37, which is $118.86 more than was given last year. Twelve 
of our churches did not contribute to this cause last year. 

Your committee recommends that all the churches plan to parti- 
cipate in this enterprise with a larger degree of liberality. 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. R. HAIGHT, 
J. W. DOWNEY, 
H. J. VANN 

♦ A small balance of debt on the Chowan Building at the 
Orphanage, amounting to $7.81, was cancelled by taking a 
collection for same. 

The following recommendation was adopted: 

Your Committee on Apportionment, in session assembled on 
Thursday, October 18, 1917, unanimously adopted the following 
recommendation: 

(1) that two-thirds of all funds raised by this Association for 
Christian Education be given to Chowan College; and, 

(2) That all such funds be sent to our Associational Treas- 
urer, who shall be requested~'to retain two-thirds for Chowan 
College and forward the remaining one-third to the Treasurer 
of the Baptist State Convention. 

(Signed) 

JOHN F. CALE, 
M. P. DAVIS, 
S. N. WATSON, 
E. L. GATLING, 
C. G. POWELL, 

Committee. 

The Report of the Apportionment Committee, was made 
by J. r. Cale, and was adopted. 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION APPORf lONMENT FOR 
1917-18. 



Churches 




Ahoskie { 


p 192 


$ 175 


f 225 


$ 10 


$ 225 


$ 74 


$ 25 


$ 936 


Aulander 


175 


150 


210 


10 


225 


70 


20 


860 


Ashley's Grove 


50 


30 


50 


2 


60 


20 


3 


215 




35 


25 


37 


3 


40 


14 


6 


160 


Bethlehem 


65- 


45 


70 


3 


60 


26 


5 


274 


Bethany 


40 


30 


50 


2 


30 


16 


6 


174 


Brantley's Grove_ 


43 


33 


47 


2 


25 


17 


3 


170 


Buckhorn 


210 


165 


210 


12 


260 


84 


20 


961 


Capehart's 


48 


30 


48 


3 


30 


19 


6 


184 


Cashie 


150 


120 


150 


7 


250 


60 


11 


748 


Center Grove __ 


45 


35 


45 


2 


70 


18 


6 


221 


Christian Harbor 


40 


30 


45 


2 


75 


16 


16 


224 


Colerain 


135 


90 


140 


5 


200 


54 


15 


639 


Connaritsa 


55 


45 


65 


5 


120 


22 


7 


319 


Creekville 


18 


12 


20 


2 


35 


8 


4 


99 


Conway 


80 


65 


90 


3 


150 


32 


10 


430 


Elam 


40 


30 


45 


4 


150 


16 


8 


293 


Galatia 


45 


32 


45 


6 


30 


18 


6 


182 


Green's X Roads 


40 


30 


40 


2 


25 


15 


3 


155 


Harrellsville 


55 


40 


60 


2 


80 


22 


6 


265 


Hebron 


30 


20 


30 


2 


25 


12 


5 


124 


Hillside _ 


10 


6 


10 


2 


5 


5 


2 


4M 


Holly Grove 


50 


40 


55 


5 


90 


20 


5 


265 


Holly Springs __ 


20 


15 


20 


2 


20 


8 


3 


88 


Horton's 


20 


15 


20 


2 


20 


8 


2 


87 


Jackson 


55 


45 


70 


4 


125 


22 


10 


331 


Kelford 


50 


40 


55 


3 


65 


20 


6 


239 


Lasker 


30 


25 


30 


2 


35 


12 


3 


137 


Lawrence 


38 


26 


38 


2 


35 


15 


4 


158 


Lewiston 


90 


70 


100 


3 


100 


36 


10 


409 


Margarettsville __ 


20 


12 


20. 


2 


25 


8 


4 


91 


Mars Hill 


125 


75 


125 


5 


175 


52 


7 


564 


Meherrin 


70 


55 


75 


3 


80 


30, 


6 


319 


Mount Carmel__ 


45 


35 


55 ' 


2 


45 


18 


5 


205 


Murfreesboro 


125 


85 


125 


10 


105 


50 


5 


505 


Mount Tabor 


200 


160 


210 


5 


225 


78 


8 


886 


Menola 


60 


40 


70 


3 


75 


24 


5 


277 


Merry Hill 


25 


20 


25 


2 


30 


10 


4 


116 


Oak Grove 


30 


22 


30 




30 


12 


3 


129 


Pine Forest 


10 


6 


10 


2 


10 


4 


2 


44 


Potecasi 


70 


60 


75 


3 


150 


28 


5 


391 


Pleasant Grove __ 


40 


30 


45 


2 


40 


16 


5 


178 


Powellsville 


80 


65 


80 


2 


80 


32 


5 


344 


Relnublican 


60 


40 


70 


5 


125 


24 


5 


329 


Rich Sqiiare 


115 


100 


125 


5 


150 


46 


6 


547 


Roanoke 


15 


10 


15 


2 


20 


6 


2 


70 


Robert's Chapel 


200 


150 


200 


5 


210 


80 


12 


857 


Ross's 


85 


60 


85 


3 


75 


34 


7 


349 


Riverside 


15 


10 


16 


2 


15 


5 


3 


66 


Sandy Run _ 


70 


55 


75 


3 


75 


28 


6 


312 


Seaboard 


50 


40 


60 


3 


70 


20 


8 


251 


Siloam 


10 


6 


11 


2 


12 


4 


3 


48 


Severn 


120 


100 


120 


5 


160 


48 


. 10 


563 


St. John 


30 


22 


35 


2 


35 


12 


5 


141 


Union 


75 


60 


90 


4 


90 


30 


6 


355 


Winton 


175 


150 


200 


6 


250 


70 


12 


863 


Woodland 


85 


70 


100 


3 


100 


34 


6 


398 




$3,959 


$3,052 


$4,267 


$207 


$5,117 


$1,582 


$391 


$18,575 


Bethel 


35 


25 


' 40 


4 


iOO 


14 


3 


221 


Barley's Grove 


10 


5 


10 


2 


10 


4 


3 


44 




$4,004 


$3,082 


$4,317 


$213 


$5,227 


$1,600 


$397 


$18,840 



WEST CHOWAN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



25 



r 



The following resolution was unanimously passed: 

Resolved, That the thanks of the Association be extended to 
the Ahoskie Church and community for their gracious hospi- 
tality in caring for this session of the Association. 

W. A. Thomas, Treasurer of the Association, made his 
report, which was adopted. 

TREASURER'S REPORT. 

October 3, 1916, to amout received from R. P. Thomas, 

Treasurer $ 2.7 2 

October 4, 1916, to amount received from Finance Com- 
mittee 116.32 

Total $119. U4i 

Credits. 

November 6, 1916, by amount paid N. W. Britton for sen- 
vices as Clerk $ 35.00 

November 6, 1916, by amount paid Mutual Publishing 

Company, for printing minutes 80. UO 

Total $115.00 

October 30, 1917, balance due West Chowan Association .. $ 4.04 
Respectfully submitted, 
m-- . W. A. THOMAS. Treasurer. 

The following delegates were appointed — C. H. Jenkins, 
W. Britton, J. E. Vann, to the Baptist State Conven- 
tion; eC. W. Mitchell to the Southern Baptist Convention. 

J. F. Cale was re-elected a member of the State Mission 
Board; M. P. Davis, Associational Vice-President of the 
Foreign Mission Board ; W. R. Haight, Associational Vice- 
President of the Home Mission Board. 

PREAM15LE AND RESOLUTIONS. 

Whereas, our Association comprises 59 churches, the larger 
number of which have preaching not oftener than two Sundays 
in each month, and 

Whereas, it is the sense of this body that more frequent preach- 
ing would greatly promote the spiritual efficiency of those 
churches, therefore 

Resolved, 1. That we hereby recommend, that such cnurches as 
now have preaching only two Sundays in each month, make an 
earnest effort to have preaching every Sunday; and that such 



26 THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION 

churches as now have preaching only one Sunday in each month, 
make an earnest effort to have a service for preaching at least 
two Sundays in each month. 

Resolved, 2. That the churches to which reference is made in 
the foregoing resolution be, and they are hereby recommended 
to make an "every member canvass," for the purpose of ascer- 
taining how much each member is willing to contribute annually, 
toward the support of a pastor for either full time, or half time, 
and that such canvass be completed not later than January 1, 
1918. F. B. RAYMOND. 

Aftei a very busy, successful, and harmonious session the 
Association adjourned with prayer by W. L. Poteat. 

C. H. JEI^KINS, Moderator. 
K W. BKITTON^, Clerk. 



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CHURCHES AND CONSTITUTIONS. 



Chucrhes 



Location and Date of Constitution. 



Ahoskie 

Aulander 

Ashley's Grrove 

Askewville 

Bethlehem 

Bethany 

Brantley's Grove 

*Buckhorn 

Capehart's 

Cashie 

Center Grove 

Chowan 

Christian Harbor 

Coleraine 

Connaritsa 

Creeksville 

Conwav 

Elam 1 

Galatia 

Green Cross Roads. 

Harrellsville 

Hebron 

Hillside 

HoUy Grove 

Holly Springs 

Horton's 

Jackson 

Keif or d 

Lasker 

Lawrence's 

Lewiston ' 

Margarettsville 

Mars Hills 

Meherrin 

Mount Carmel 

Mount Tabor 

Murfreesboro 

Menola 

Merry Hill 

Oak Grove 

Pine Forest 

Potecasi 

Pleaasnt Grove 

Powellsville 

Republican 

Rich Square 

Roanoke 

Robert's Chapel 

Ross's 

Riverside 

Sandy Run 

Seaboard 

Siloam 

Severn 

St. John's 

Union 

Winton 

Woodland 

Earley"s Grove 

* Bethel 



Hertford County 1804 

Bertie County 1886 

Northampton County 1910 

Bertie County 191? 

Hertford County 1835 

Bertie County 1881 

Hertford County 1877 

Hertford County 18.35 

Bertie County 1824 

Bertie County 1770 

Bertie County 1897 

Hertford County 1895 

Hertford County 188'. 

Bertie County 1780 

Bertie County 1789 

Northampton County 1892 

Northampton County 1905 

Northampton County 1844 

Northampton County 1859 

Bertie County 1874 

Hertford County 1875 

Northampton County 1856 

Bertie County _* __1885 

Bertie County 1_1804 

Hertford County 1907 

Hertford County 1915 

Northampton County 1882 

Bertie County 1898 

Northampton County 1900 

Bertie County 1874 

Bertie County 1883 

Northampton County 1880 

Bertie County 1854 

Hertford County 1729 

Northampton County 1820 

Hertford County 1839 

Hertford County 1843 

Hertford County 1908 

Bertie County 1910 

Hertford County 1894 

Northampton County 1838 

Northampton County 1808 

Hertford County _J 1837 

Bertie County 1911 

Bertie County 1803 

Northampton County 1854 

Northampton County 1885 

Northampton Countv 1848 

Bertie County 1804 

1913 

Bertie Counts- 1750 

Northampton " County 1889 

Bertie County 1885 

Northampton County 1896 

Hertford County 1883 

Hertford County 1885 

Hertford County 1873 

Northampton County 1902 

Hertford County 1917 

Northampton County ,._]917 




i 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

, THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL, SESSION 

OF THE 

West Chowan Baptist Association 

HELD AT 

COLERAIN BAPTIST CHURCH 

BERTIE COUNTY 
NOVEMBER 26 and 2 7, 1 9 1 8 



The next session to be held with Seaboard Church, Northampton 
County, beginning on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October, 1919. 
To preach the sermon, D. Cale or T. L. Brown. 



Raleigh 

MUTUAL Publishing Company, Printers 
1918 



/ 




MINUTES 

OF THE 

THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

West Chowan Baptist Association 

HELD AT 

COLERAIN BAPTIST CHURCH 

BERTIE COUNTY 
NOVEMBER 26 and 27, 1918 



The next session to be held with Seaboard Church, Northampton 
County, beginning on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October, 1919. 
To preach the sermon, D. Cale or T. L. Brown. 



Raleigh 

Mutual Publishing Company, Printers 
1918 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS. 



J. R. Mathews Aulander, N. C. 

Dancy Cale Potecasi, N. C. 

S. B. Barnes Merry Hill, N. C. 

C. W. Scarborough Franklin, Va. 

T. T. Speight Windsor, N. C. 

R. T. White Conway, N. C. 

F. B. Raymond Como, N. C. 

N. H. Shepherd Colerain, N. C. 

J. F. Cale Roxobel, N. C. 

P. A. Underwood Winton, N. C. 

N. J. Todd Winterville, N. C. 

W. R. Haight Windsor, N. C 

Alexander Miller Jackson, N. C. 

J. W. Downey _ Severn, N. C. 

James Long Aulander. N. C. 

R. B. Lineberry Colerain, N. C. 

F. T. Collins Ahoskie, N. C. 

R. K. White Conway, N. C. 

T. L. Brown Lewiston, N, C. 

G. C. Wilder Tunis, N. .C. 

Jesse F. Colston... Potecasi, N. C. 

W. H. Hollowell Ktelford, N. C. 

Paul S. Sykes Conway, N. C. 

*A. C. McCall Gates, N. C. 

OFFICERS. 

C. H. Jenkins, Moderator Aulander, N. C. 

J. F. Cale, Vice-Moderator.. Roxobel, N. C. 

N. W. Britton, Clerk Winton, N. C. 

W. A. Thomas, Treasurer Cofield, N. C. 

R. B. Lineberry, Historian Colerain, N. C. 



The officers constitute the Executive Committee of the Asso- 
ciation. 

COIMjVUTTEES. 

Missions — F. T. Collins, J. H. Mathews, P. J. Long, D. R. 
Britton. 

Christian Education — T. L. Brown, J. S. Jenkins, E. L. Gat- 
lir.g, F. B. Raymond. 

Christian Social Service — John F. Cale, Henry Stephenson, 
Jesse Blalock, Alexander Miller. 

Apportionment Committee — C. W. Scarborough, S. N. Watson, 
R. B. Lineberry, C. W. Mitchell, Dr. Wayland Mitchell, W. L. 
Curtis. 



♦Pastor, but not residing in the Association. 



4 



THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION 



CONSTITUTION. 



Name. 

Article 1. This body shall be known as the North Carolina 
West Chowan Baptist Association. 

3Iembership. 

Art. 2. It shall be composed of messengers olected by the 
churches connected with this body, and all ordained ministers 
who are members or pastors of said churches, together with the 
offiGers of this Association, and chairmen of all standing com- 
mittees. Each church of one hundded members and under shall 
be entitled to two messengers, and for each additional one hun- 
dred members, an additional messenger: Provided, that no 
church shall have more than four messengers. 

Objects. 

Art. 3. The objects shall be to devise and recommend meas- 
user for increasing the harmony, the intelligence, and the spirit- 
ual power of the churches, and for developing and directing 
their energies, their resources and their gifts, in advancing the 
Redeemer's Kingdom in the earth. 

Powers ancl Pi'erogatives. 

Art. 4. The Association shall have no power to infringe upon 
the sovereignty or rights of the churches. It is neither an ecclesi- 
astical nor legislative council, nor court of appeal. It may advise 
the churches and recommend measures of usefulness for their 
adoption, but can not bind them in any way. Yet, in view of the 
combined wisdom, piety and inteligence of the body, it may 
justly claim for itself, for its objects and for its recommenda- 
tion the very highest consideration and regard. 

Art. 5. The Association may dissolve connection with any 
church that becomes heterodox in doctrine, or disorderly in 
practice, or that fails to represent itself either by messenger or in 
letter, more than two successive sessions, without sufficient rea- 
sons, or that treats with contempt its objects and requirements, 
or upon application of a church for dismission. 

Rights of Churches. 

Art. 6. Each individual church shall hold and exercise all 
the functions of an independent church of Jesus Christ. As con- 
stituent members of this Association, the churches shall have 
right to advise, when desired, in case of difficulty, and to sug- 
gest plans of usefulness to be adopted. It shal be the undis- 
puted privilege of any church to withdraw its membership from 
this Association whenever it shall so electt. 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



5 



Duties of Churches. 

Art. 7. It shall be the duty of the churches to appoint as 
lessengers, as far as practicable, their most capable members, 
3 require their attendance, and to send by them a contribution 
D the Association fund to pay for printing the minutes and other 
ecessary expenses. 

Art. 8. It shall be the duty of each church to send an annual 
jtter to the Association, giving: (1) locality; (2) names of 
s pastor and clerk and their respective postofRices; (3) the 
abbaths of regular service; (4) the church statistics, including 
le number baptized, deceived by letter, restored, dismissed, de- 
based, expelled, and aggregate membership, male and female; 
5) Sabbath school statistics; (6) amount contributed to benevo- 
mt objects and the Association fund; (7) names of messengers 
ad alternates; (8) any other information deemed of special 
nportance. 

Oi'gainization. 

Art. 9. The oiRcers of this Association shall be a Moderator, 
ice-Moderator, Clerk, Treasurer, and Historian, w^ho shall be 
ected at each annual session, from the members of the Asso- 
ation, and shall continue in office until the next annual elec- 
on, which election shall be the next order of business after the 
irollment of messengers. As soon as the new officers shall have 
ken their seats, the body shall be declared organized and pre- 
ired for business. 

Art. 10. In order to conserve time and not interfere with the 
ain work of the body, this Association will not consider any 
tutine or miscellaneous business except at the close of the dis- 
ission of each general topic. 

Duties of Officers. 

Art. 11. It shall be the duty of the Moderator to open the 
eetings punctually at time appointed; to enforce the rules; to 
•eserve order, and to exercise all the prerogatives of a presiding 
ficer, according to the principles of parliamentary usage. 
Art. 12. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Moderator to dis- 
large the duties of the M^oderator in his absence. 
Art, 13. It shall* be the duty of the Clerk to keep a faithful 
cord of the proceedings of the body, and superintend the 
inting and distribution of same, and to keep on file the printed 
inutes and other important documents belonging to the body, 
e may appoint an assistant when necessary. 
Art. 14. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive and 
sburse the money contributed to the Minute Fund, as directed 
' the body, and make an annual report of same. 
Art. 15. It shall be the duty of the Historian, who shall be 
ected at each annual meeting of the body, to prepare for pub- 
;ation in the Minutes an historical sketch of the church with 



6 



THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION 



which the Association meets, with obituaries, incidents, and ot 
tacts of the year that should, be preserved, and make report 
the next Association. 

Art. 16. This Constitution may be altered at any annual £ 
sion of the body by a vote of two-thirds of the members prese 

Resolutions. 

Resolved (1) That no church shall be entitled to represen 
tion in this body unless in perfect accord with the Constitut; 
thereof, that fact to be ascertained by a committee of five on c 
dentials, appointed at each session of the body "immediately af 
organization; (2) the report of this committee shal be the pn 
erty of the Association just as any other report. (Adopted 189; 

Resolved (2) That henceforth this Association withdraw 1 
lowship from any church that allows its members to' engage 
the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors as a bevera: 
(1891.) 

Resolved (3) That it is the sense of this Association that S€ 
ing intoxicating liquors through a dispensary is a violation 
the sprit and letter of the resolution of our Constituti< 
( 1905.) 



RUUES OF ORDER. 

1. The Association shall convene annually at the time a 
place of its own adjournment. 

2. During each annual session it shall meet and adjourn frc 
day to day at the hours fixed upon by the body. 

3. All meetings of the Association shall be opened and clos 
with religious exercises. 

4. A majority of the members present shall be a quorum 1 
the transaction of business. 

5. No member shall absent himself temporally witho 
leave of the Moderator, nor finally without leave of the body. 

6. No member shal speak more than twice on the same su 
ject without permission of the body. 

7. No member shall be allowed to talk, stand up,, read 
move about the house during business, except to gain or impa 
information under consideration. 

8. No committee shall be in session during the hour of bui 
ness without permission from the body. 

9. All questions of order not herein provided shall be decid 
by Mell's Parliamentary Practice. 



i 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



7 



I UST OF DELEGATES 

Ahoskie — W. H. Miller , T. B. Modlln. 

Aulander- — C. W. Mitchell, Herbert Jenkins, D. H. Grreen. 

Asheiy's Grove — W. H. Vann, J. K. Vann. 

Askewville — J. W. Evans, J. G. Mitchell, W. R. Butler. 

Bethlehem — W. A. Perry, W. A. Thomas. 

Bethany — H. L. Perry, W. C. Hughes, Jr., R. S. Perry. 

Brantley — A. O. Kiff, J. C. Jenkins, J. R. Willoughhy. 

Buckhorn — R. O. Whitley, J. €. Taylor, J. L. Howell. 

Bethel — 

Capehart— J. T. White, S. J. Ward, J. J. Carter. 

Cashie— J. H. White, J. H. Mathews, H. M. Early. 

Center Grove — ^J. D. Jenkins, S. A. Dildy. 
. Christian Harbor — F. P. Britt, R. W. Fairless, Bernard Bass. 

Coleraine^ — D. R. Britton, E. S. Evans, S. W. Crawford, O. B. 
lughes. 

Connaritsa — Joseph S. Jenkins, J. E. Mathews, Josiah Early. 
Creeksville — 
Conway — 

Elam — T. J. Bass, R. T. Kee, B. L. Sykes. 
Earley — M. A. Johnson, G. D. Lewis. 
Galatia — 

Green's Cross Roads — lA. D. Cale, G. W. Mizelle, W. T. Asbell. 
Harrellsville — W. E. Miller, E. B. Holloman. 
Hebron — W. E. Johnson, J. E. Griffim. 
Hillside — Frank Harden, E. D. Spruill. 
Holly Grove — W. P. Myers, J. J. Tayloe. 
Holly Springs — W. D. McGlohon, J. R. Wilder, C. L. Scott. 
Horton's — H. W. Green, Walter Powell, P. H. Parker. 
Jackson — P. M. Fleetwood, F. R. Harris. 
Kelford — C. L. L. Cobb, Geo. T. Brown, W. C. Evans. 
Lasker — B. T. Bridgers, P. L. Askew, J. H. Davis. 
Lawrence's — W. M. Keeter, J. R. Phelps, J. W. Langdale. 
Lewiston — iR. L. Lodge, W. H. Taylor, Dr. Wayland Mitchell, 
(V J. Barnes. 
Margarettesville — 

Mars Hill — J. M. Phelps, J. J. Lee, J. C. Miller. 
Meherrin— ^J. K. Parker, C. C. Parker, S. T. Liverman, S. D. 
^ooke. 
Mount Carmel — 

Mount Tabor — C. W. Stephenson, Gladston Storey, J. H. Dar- 
len. 

Murfreesboro — 

Menole — I. F. Snipes, J. F. Cowan. 

Merry Hill — S. A. Adams, J. T. Keeter, Joe White. 

Oak Grove — A. E. Saunders, Jas. E. Lang, Edward Saunders. 

Pine Forest — L. A. Jordan, W. H. Camp. 

Potecasi — J. A. Parker, Jesse Colston, J. R. Baughan. 

Pleasant Grove — ^M. L. Taylor, P. W. Askew, A. R. Harmon. 



8 



THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION 



Powellsville — J. W. Raynor, N. H. Brown. 

Republican — M. L. White, E. G. Cowan, L. T. Bazemore, A, V. 
Cobb. 

Rich Square— J. T. Bolton. 
Roanoke — ^^J. H. Braswell, W. J. Hedgepeth. 
Roberts Chapel — D. M. Woodard, J. C. Taylor, J. H. Stephen^ 
son. 

Ross's — J H. Lawrence, J. B. Mitchell, D. J. Hughson, A. F. 
Castellow. 

Riverside — C. C. Holder, W'm. Williams. 

Sandy Run — J. M. Jacobs, C. R. Liverman, A. V. Hall. 

Seaboard — C. P. Stephenson, B. S. Stancell, J. R. Crocker. 

Siloam — R. L. Speller, B. S. Leggett. 

Severn — R. E. Maddrey, J. B. Mann, W. H. Howq^l. 

St. John's — M. R. Sumner, R. L, Edwards. 

Union — J. A. Copeland, T. N. Charles. 

Winton — W- P. Shaw, J. S. Shaw. 

Woodland — C. G. Parker, C. H. Griffin, G. M. Holloman. 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



9 




ORiDER OP BUSIN^B]SS. 



First Day. 

10:00 a. m. — Devotional Exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Enroll Messengers, Organize, Invite Visitors, 
€all Names of Churches That Failed to Report 
Last Year. 

10:45 a.m. — Receive New Churches, Appoint Committees. 

10:45 a. m. — Biblical Recorder. 

11:00 a. m. — Orphanage. 

12:00 a. m. — Christian Social Service. 

12:20 p. m. — Ministers' Relief. ) 

12:45 p. m, — Recess. 

2:00 p. m. — Colleges and Schools (20 minutes each.) 

2:40 p. m. — Sunday-schools. 

3:10 p. m. — Ministerial Education. 

3:45 p. m. — Assignment of Homes. Adjournment. 

7:00 p. m. — Praise Service. 

7:30 p. m. — Introductory Sermon, by D. Cale. 
8:30 p. m. — Miscellaneous Business. Adjournment. 

Second Day. 

9:00 a. m. — Devotional Exercises-^^James Long. 
9:15 a. m. — Miscellaneous Business. 
9:30 a. m. — Report on Church Statistics. 
10:30 a. m. — State Missions. , 
11:00 a. m. — Home Missions. \ 
11:30 a. m. — Foreign Missions. S 
12:00 a. m. — Woman's Work. i 
12:30 p. m. — Recess. 

2:00 p. m. — ^Christian Education. 
3:00 p. m. — ^^Report of Apportionnlent Committee. 
3:15 p. m. — Miscellaneous Business. 
3:30 p. m. — Adjournment. j 
By your Committee, ' 

ALEXANDER MILLAR, 
DANCY CALE, 
W. R.' HAIGHT, 



/ 



PROCEEDINGS 



Colerain, N. C, Nov. 26, 1918. 

The West Cliowan Association met this day in its thirty- 
sixth annual session with the Colerain Baptist Church, 
Bertie County. 

A^ter devotional exercises, the Moderator, C. H. Jenkins, 
called the Association to order and the body proceeded at 
once to organize. After the enrollment of delegates, offi- 
cers were elected as follows : C. H. Jenkins, Moderator ; J. 
F. Cale, Vice-Moderator ; N. W. Britton, Clerk ; W. A. Thom- 
as, Treasurer; R. B. Lineberry, Historian. 

The following visitors were recognized : Dr. W. L. Poteat, 
president of Wake Forest College; J. S. Farmer, business 
3r of the Biblical Recorder; F. B. Hamrick, repre- 
senting the Thomasville Orphanage, and F. D. Winston, of 
Windsor. 

The Association was glad to welcome the new pastors 
among us, who are N. H. Shepard, P. A. Underwood, and 
F. T. Collins. 

On motion, the order of business as printed in the minutes 
was adopted. 

It now being time for the report on the Biblical Recor- 
der, J. S. Farmer presented the claims of the Recorder upon 
our people and the reasons why the paper should be in 
every family. 

The report on Christian Social Service, (1) Orphanage; 
(2) Ministers' Relief, was presented by J. F. Cale, and was 
spoken to by J. F. Cale, F. B. Hamrick, P. M. Fleetwood, 
C. W. Scarborough, and was adopted. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN SOOIAL SERVICE. 

Under the general head "Christian Social Service" are grouped 
two important departments of our denomiantional activity — Or- 
phanage work and Ministers' Relief. 

1. Orphanage Work. 

This department of our work dates from the year 1885. la 
November of that year the first child was received at Thomas- 
ville. Since that date 1,89 children have been received. 
Through this department of our work we are now caring for 52 5 
children — 450 at Thomasville and 7 5 at the Kennedy Home. 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



11 



The daily cost of caring for each of these 52 5 children is 40 
Its; the monthly cost $12.12; the annual cost $145.44. The 
ily cost of caring for all of the 52 5 children now in the Or- 
anage is $210; the monthly cost $6,300; the annual cost 
5,356. 

The printing office reports a net income for the year of $6,006. 
e Kennedy Home farm has realized a profit of $5,321.83. Dur- 
; the year farm and dairy products to the value of $11,3 99.49 
ve been consumed. 

Permanent improvements to the amount of $10,681.18 have 
en made within the year — $3,842.83 at Thomasville and $6,- 
8.3 5 at the Kennedy Home. 

The scourge of influenza has hit the Orphanage hard. It has 
ffiered both from the disease itself and from the closing of our 
urches on account of it. We need this year to emphasize the 
anksgiving offering as never before. Let every church, every 
nday-school, every individual on or about Thanksgiving make 
thank offering to the Orphanage equal at least to one day's 
irk or one day's income. 

II. Ministers' Relief. 

The Baptist Ministers' Relief Board has for its object the 
fing for aged and disabled preachers and the widows of 
irthy ministers. These servants have labored and we have en- 
•ed into their labors. We owe them a lasting debt of grati- 
ie. Are we doing by them as our hearts tell us we should do? 
r the most worthy, but needy servants of the Lord we gave 
;t year the pitiful sum of $361.37. Shall we not greatly in- 
jase our contributions to Ministers' Relief? Will not each 
urch make an annual contribution to help those in need who 
ve served so faithfully? 

1^ Respectfully submitted, JOHN P. CALE- 

P. M. Fleetwood was appointed by the Moderator to col- 
it the minute fund. 

The Association adjourned for dinner, with the benedic- 
m by J. F. Cale. 

Tuesday — Afternoon Session. 

After devotional exercises, the Association proceeded to 
e regular order of business. 

T. L. Brown presented the report on Christian Education, 
) Sunday-schools; (2) Colleges and Schools; (3) Ministe- 
il Education. This report was discussed by W. L. Poteat 
d C. W. Scarbroough. The following resolution, in con- 
ction with the report, was adopted, and J. H. Mathews 



12 



THIRTY^SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION 



was appointed to present the resolution at the next sessi( 
of the Baptist State Convention. 

Whereas, the Christian denominations of North Carolina a 
contributing largely to the education of the people of our Stai 
through their educational institutions; and, 

Whereas, the Baptist denomination is now undertaking to rai 
one million dollars for the endowment of its educational ins' 
tutions in this State in order to increase ther usefulness in tl 
field of education and to meet the ever-increasing demands 
the educational standard of the times; and, 

Whereas, the present educational policy of the State appea 
to be discriminatory against the Christian educational instit 
tions, in that, First: Free tuition and other allowances are ma( 
by the State institutions to be paid out of the public treasury I 
the State, instead of being issued directly by the State to tl 
student meriting the same, to be used as he may elect in al 
school he may desire to attend; and, Second: Students from sov 
of the State schools seem able to secure special privileges in ce| 
tificates, diplomas and positions not open to students from tl 
Christian educational institutions who have taken the same courl 
of study and attained the same degree of proficiency; and, | 

Whereas, we believe that the existence of Christian educationi 
institutions, for th© training of Christian manhood and womaj 
hood, is essential to the life and good government of our peopl 
as. has been so clearly demonstrated by the non-Christian educ' 
tional policy of the German government, which has broug] 
upon the world the horrors and crimes against civilization ai 
humanity of the present world war; and. 

Whereas, as a free, democratic, Christian people, we shou 
request our great State to remove any existing discriminate 
in its school policy, and maintain equal rights and fair trea 
ment to all of the schools of the State, both State institutioi 
and Christian institutions alike, in order that all may work : 
harmony and love in the great task of educating every body ar 
girl in North Carolina: 

Now, therefore, be it resolved: That the West Chowan Ass 
elation hereby petition the Baptist State Convention, at its ne:| 
session, to appoint a committee to investigate the present educi 
tional policy of the State with reference to any possible discrii! 
ination against the Christian educational institutons of th 
State, or any failure in that policy to recognize these institutioi; 
as a part of the educational machinery of the State, and to fo 
mulate and advise such plans- of procedure as in its judgmei 
may be proper to remove such discrimination, should any 1 
found to exist; and that said committee be empowered to tal 
such action in the premises as it may deem proper. 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



13 



REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION. 
I Sunday-schools. 

As a teaching and evangelizing force the Sunday-school is 
ndispensable to the grovvth and development of the local 
church. The widely prevailing ignorance of God's Word is ap- 
Dalling, and constitutes one of the very greatest hindrances to 
;;!hriscian progress. The most efficient means for the removal 
)f this cloud of ignorance lies in the teaching powers of the 
sunday-school. This teaching value alone is of sufficient worth 
;o commend the work to us as worthy of our best, endeavor. 

Teacher Training. Increasingly the State is stressing the im- 
)ortance of trained and qualified teachers in the common schools, 
vhere our boys and girls are instructed five days in the week. 
Dn the Sabbath day, when the text-book is the Bible, these 
;ame boys and girls all too frequently fall into the hands of un« 
;rained teachers. The careless, haphazard attempt that is 
here made to give them the good of the soul often disgusts 
hem, and they are given an aversion to Bible study,. .A more 
jfficient teaching force is the one well-nigh universal need and 
leinand of all our schools. And in those schools that have not 
indertaken to meet this need, we would commend to the pastors 
ind superintendents the importance of organizing their teach- 
ers into classes for the purpose of pursuing the course of study 
)utlined by our Sunday School Board. We recommend, too, 
;hat teacher training be emphaized, not only among present offi- 
;ers and teachers, but in a normal class of prospective teach- 
jrs reciting during the Sunday-school hour. We further recom- 
nend that our State Sunday-school Secretary be requested to 
londuct three or more Institutes within our territory during the 
ioming year, and that this Association appoint someone to con- 
lult with him in making the necessary arrangements. 

Enlarged Membership. We would emphasize the importance 
)f definite campaigns for reaching more of our people for the 
5unday-school. Church members must be enlisted. Out of a 
otal church membership of 12,897, only 4,789 church mem- 
)ers were enlisted in Sunday-school work last year. Our total 
junday-school enrollment was 8,392. We have an unreached 
ionstituency of at least 16,000 people. 

Enlistment, then, is one of our great tasks. We commend 
he religious census as the best way to perform this task. 

Organixed Classes. There is now on, in the Southern Bap- 
fist Convention, a drive for 1,000,000 men and women in our 
t)rganized Classes. North Carolina is expected to furish 100,000 
)f these; and, if the proportion is maintained throughout the 
territory, more than 4,000 must be found within the West 
'howan Association. We especially commend this movement as 
^elpful in enlisting the present unenlisted church members in 
jur midst. We urge that these classes operate with the "Con- 



14 



THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION 



ventioii Adult Bible Class Department" of our Sunday School 
Board at NashvlUe. 

Equipment. In order to do our best work in the Sunday- 
school, our church houses and their equipment must be im- 
proved. Teachers of the several grades in our common schools 
are not all crowded into one room and then expected to do their 
best work. No more should our Sunday-school teachers be 
jxpected to do their best work amid similar surroundings. 

licnevoleiices. Proper emphasis upon the development of a 
spirit of benevolence in our schools will, ;n after years, tell! 
mightily upon the benevolences of our churches. We recom- 
mend the adoption by all our schools of the following program 
proposed by our State Sunday School Secretary and Committee: 
(1) The Orphanage one Sunday in each month. (2) Home and' 
Foreign Missions on "Mission Day" in the Sunday-school in ' 
March. (3) Sunday-school Missions one Sunday in May and I 
October, using Children's Day in May. (4) Christian Educa- i 
tion on the fourth Sunday in June, using the special lesson in ' 
the Sunday-school literature. (5) State Missions on the fourth! 
Sunday in September, using special lesson and program provided \ 
for the day. (6) Ministerial relief on one Sunday near Christ- j 
mas. 

Shall We Go Forward? Or shall the suggestions and recom- 
mendations of this report go for naught? The work of the Sun-) 
day-school easily holds a foremost place in Christian endeavor. ! 
The Sunday-school is one of our most effective evangelizing agen- 
cies, in that one of its primary objects is to reach out after thai 
lost; and as a training department it is unsurpassed, in that itj 
trains the young converts in effective personal service. It is a 
fact that the churches that have the best trained men and wo-! 
men to lead their work are invariably churches with live, grow-! 
ing Sunday-schools. From these churches we are getting all! 
our leaders in denominational work. They, too, are reporting! 
the larger number of conversions from year to year. The I 
strengthening of this department of the church's work is ofj 
paramount and vital importance. For the coming year let our 
watchwords be — Ediieatioii! Enlargement! Equipment! Organi- 
zation! , . 

ir. Education. 

The old idea that the object of education was to elevate the 
student above the working class is fast losing ground. Fathers 
say less frequently now, "I am sending my boy to college thatj 
he may not have to work as I have worked." The wise parent| 
now realizes that his boy's own best interests demand that he\ 
becomes a master of labor. This is education. The spiritually} 
wise parent goes a step beyond this, and seeks that kind ofl 
training for his boy which transforms the commercial spirit em- 
phasized by the worldly school. The school he seeks is the one 
that teaches its students to reproduce the character of Christ 



WEST C^OWAN ASSOCIATION. 



15 



le working in the office, on the farm, or at the daily round of 
sehold duties. This is Christian education. And the world, 
ay, is calling- for men and women who can demonstrate the 
I, true education through daily living. It is a well-knowi% 
t that we are dependent almost wholly upon our Christian 
eges for our supply of trained ministers, but the world needs 
demands men and women in all callings who are practically 
istian. A well-known writer says, "It requires more grace, 
^e stern discipline of character, to work for Grod in the capac- 
of a mechanic, merchant, lawyer, farmer, carrying the pre- 
ts of Christianity into the ordinary habits of life, than to 
)r as an acknowledged missionary in the open field. It re- 
res a strong spiritual nerve to bring religion into the work- 
p, into the business office, sanctifying the details of every- 
life." We have a right to demand of our schools that they 
s:e of our boys and girls not only well-equipped workmen, 
that they also imbue them with the idea that when they go 
> the field with seed, and return with a harvest of tenfold, 
;wenty-fold, or a hundred-fold they are co-workers with their 
ator. The school of which such characters are the output 

attained a high place in the educational world. 
)ducation has come to mean, not so much the emphasizing of 
leory, but power to do. With world-wise training it means 
'■er to do evil. Of this the educational system of Germany 
ids forth today as a glaring example, — and a warning as 
1. At a terrible cost Germany has taught us a great lesson. 
' war has demonstrated afresh the need of Christian educa- 
i. That the neglect of the spiritual side is detrimental to 
State as well as to the church. The school whose curriculum 
s not revolve about Christ as the center is no fit place for 
training of the world's future citizens. Better no educa- 
l than an education divorced from religion, 
^he educational function of the State is recognized by us as 
kens. Baptists have ever been the friends of popular educa- 
. Not only have they cheerfully paid their taxes for its sup- 

but in many instances have voted special taxes on them- 
es. We urge that our people patronize the common 
^ols, for they furnish all the education that the masses of the 
pie will ever receive. As citizens we should strive to see 
\ they receive fairer treatment at the hamds of the State; 
j vast appropriations be not made to higher education to the 
lect of primary education. We ought to demand the en- 
ement of the public school funds, so as to guarantee to 
|y child of the State a session of six month's school every year 
I competent teachers in charge paid efficient salaries. 

these primary schools, though the teacher be Christian, 
annot take care of the spiritual development of the child, 
so, upon the parents at this period rests the responsibility 
istructing the child in its first ideas of Christ, and thus be- 



Ig THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION 

gins its Christian education. When the child passes beyoi 
the influence of home in search o£ high school and college tra 
ing, it is important that he seek those schools w^ere he sh, 
receive sympathetic, personal Christian guidance and teachii 
This the State cannot give, tor only mental training cow 
properly within the sphere o£ the State school. " P^^^. 
the State's lunction to make provision for ^P'"'"^' 
Naturallv, too, the State will place the emphasis on the secu 
and the t;mporal, upon those elements which tend to make lo; 
and obedient citizens. By her system of training Bh^ ^eeks 
d:^velop that type of character which shall he help u to her 
attaining those ends which she is pursuing Only the Christ 
school furnishes the highest scheme of education. Here ale 
mav be taught the great principles of Christianity m th 
^rtaitive purity, as drawn immediately from the Word of G. 
The inculcation Of these principles is vital to all denom.natio, 
li?e power, and progress. The denominational school i the o 
one to which denominational workers, laymen as well as n. 
isters can be satisfactorily prepared. 

The Million Dollar Canipalgn. Better physical equipm 
and more endowment are essential to the continued prosper 
of o^r Baptist schools. The time is no longer l?uture wh 
it they are to continue in competition with other schools, i 
press ng needs of both larger teaching forces and larger sala 
for the teachers must be met. The primitive methods of ■ 
aUiers-well enough in their day-will not suffice today, 
r^an who carries the methods of a generation ago into his b, 
"ess Today is but inviting certain failure. The surest way 
keep the Individual farmer of today "down" is for him o 
fhe antiquated methods and implements of agriculture that w 
n general use a decade or two ago. There would have b 
quite as much wisdom in sending our boys against the mode 
and splendidly-equipped Germans with the equipment of L: 
or Grant"rarniy as there is to expect our schools to meet 
demands of the present with the equipment of a generation , 
Strdards have clu.nged. This fact must be as truly recogn 
w^ respect to our schools as it is recognized m other sph. 

°%\\^Ta:fof « one million dollars for our three college 
wake Forest, Meredith, and Chowan-and fourteen second 
^ !i= mVv to the mind of the average Batist, looms la 
b?t only bleat. :e have been accustomed j>"herto to d< 
comparatively small things. But thi. is the day t h,, 
One of the blessings of war activities m our midst is that it 

JL ty.^ Rantist people to find themselves financially. 
:re told by one Who is activeiy co-operating with the governn 
in financing the war and who is also -tively enlisted m 
movement for endowing our Baptist schools, that It s fa 
r,Hmate that by the close of the present year the Baptist of 
StatrwiU have%„vested $30,000,000 in government securi 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



17 



ie have not spared our money in sending the very best equip- 
lent possible with which to destroy men. Shall we not now 
ive one-thirtieth as much to the equipment of our institutions 
I which men and women are made? 

We recommend that this Association accept its apportionment 
r $127,000. Furthermore, we endorse the plan of organization 
)r the campaign as outlined by the Convention Campaign Com- 
littee; and we approve the plans of apportioning' this amount 
tnong the churches. 

III. 3iinisterial Education. 

The time is past when argument is needed to convince of the 
Bcessity for a well-educated and well-qualified ministry. In 
ringing the world to Him "who to know is life eternal," the 
rogrens of the church has always been measured by the intelli- 
^nce, efficiency, and consecration of the minister. To him the 
rogress of the Kingdom is, in large measure, due. He it is 
ho must stand as a watchman on the tower, ever on the alert 
>r the forces that come to scatter, to breed discord, to divide 
ad draw away the faint or discouraged; he it is who must plan 
le campaign for church development, for the reaching of the 
asaved both at home and in the uttermost parts of the earth. 

The untutored preacher of the past served his day and gener- 
tion well. And we must ever hold him in grateful remem- 
rance for the victories the Lord wrought through him. He is 
Bserving of lasting honor in that he went into the waste places, 
ibored in obscurity and on scant material support. But the day 
I the uneducated preacher is passing. The improved education- 
i conditions of our people render the demand for the well- 
luipped minister imperative. Our churches today are demand- 
ig that our people be led into higher Christian living and better 
iid more efficient Christian work and organization. The two 
jsentials in the equipment of the minister of today are (1) a 
)n:secrated heart and (2) a cultivated mind. 

The importance and ditficulties of this blessed ministry were 
ever greater than now. The gigantic tasks that challenge the 
lurches of Christ today call for a ministry sufficiently equipped 
> lead them into spheres of achievement that our fathers never 
reamed of. And the immediate future doubtless holds in store 
ther spheres of activity of which we now know nothing, or, at 
est, of which we are now but hazily dreaming. In the world's 
reat readjustment the church must play a leading part. The 
emand of the times, in church as well as in State, is for strong 
Dung men, skilled young men, godly young men. 

It is the business of the churches (1) to discover those whom 
od would have preach His gospel, and C2) to help these young 
len get ready for this highest and most im.portant of all work, 
'or in our day, as when Galilean fishermen were called to be 
reachers and apostles, God has for the most part called His 



18 



THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION 



preachers from poor and obscure families. To aid these in 
quiring the equipment necessary for their best work is not onl 
a duty, but a privilege, an opportunity for making one of oi' 
best investments. The interest paid here is of a high rate. 

North Carolina Baptists have long fostered the cause of mil' 
isterial education. It was for this purpose primarily that WaV' 
Forest College was founded. Last year there were eighty-foi 
ministerial students at Wake Forest, of whom seventy-thrt; 
were under the care of the Board of Education. There wei 
twenty-three North Carolina men at the Seminary, seventeen ( 
whom received aid. In addition to these there were four sti 
dent volunteers at Meredith and one at Chowan. Owing to e 
isting conditions some of these figures may be slightly decrease 
this year, but the needs of the Board cannot be less. We ear: 
estly urge that the churches of this Association grant to th 
cause a more generous support. T. L. BROWN, 

The report on Christian Education Education was adopj 
ed. ^ 

The committee on hospitality assigned homes to the del 
gates, and the Association adjourned, with prayer by T. ]j 
Brown. 

Tuesday — Evening Session. 

After song service, James Long preached the Associ 
tional sermon, subject — "The Essentials of the Loc 
Church." 

C. W. Scarborough presented the report of the Treasure 
who was absent at the time. The report was adopted. 

TREASURER'S REPORT. 

West Chowan Association in account with W. A. Thom£ 
Treasurer: 

Oct. 30, 1917. Balance on hand $ 4. 

Nov. 10, 1917. Amt. received from finance committee.. 116. 

Total $120.; 

Credits. 

Dec. 17, 1917. Amt. paid Mut. Pub. Co. Minutes $ 80. 

Dec. 18, 1917. Amt. paid N. W. Britton, services as clerk 35. 
Dec. 18, 1917. Amt. paid N. W. Britton, postage 2. 

$117. 

Nov. 2 6, 1917. Balance on hand 2, 



$120, 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. A. THOMAS. Treasurer, 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



19 



In account with W. A. Thomas, Treasurer. For Christian Edu- 



:;ation: 

May 2 0, 1918. Received from Severn Baptist Church $ 48.00 

lune 30, 1918. Received from Bertie Union Meeting.. 23.47 

luly 4, 1918. Received from Severn Sunday-school. . . . 25.00 

luly 7, 1918. Received from Colerain Church 22.40 

Fuly 12, 1919. Received from Colerain Sunday-school. . 15.00 

^ug. 2 8, 1918. Received from Conway church 10.00 

Sept. 11, 1918. Received from Conway church 10.56 

sept. 2 4, 1918. Received from Christian Harbor church 18.09 

?ept. 2 7, 1918. Received from Greens X Roads Church 10.00 

sept. 28, 1918. Received from Colerain Church 20.50 

Dct. 7, 1918. Received from Bethlehem Church 2 6.00 

Dct. 14, 1918. Received from Mt. Tabor Church.. 65.00 

)ct. 21, 1918. Received from Harrellsville 30.00 

^ov. 14, 1918. Received from Kelford 20.00 

$344.02 

Ci edits. 

ruly 1, 1918. Paid Roger Watson, Treas. C. C $ 47.55 

ruly 12, 1918. Paid Roger Watson, Treas. C. C 31.60 

ruly 12, 1918. Paid Walters Durham, Treas. B. 3. C. . . 39.62 

5ept. 5, 1918. Paid W.. A. McGlohan, Treas. C. C 16.77 

)ct. 22, 1918. Paid Walters Durham, Treasurer B. S. C. 36.72 

)ct. 2 2, 1918. Paid W. A. McGloham, Treas. C. C 121.76 

^ov. 24, 1918. Paid W. A. McGloham, Treas. C. C 33.33 

^ov. 2 4, 1918. Paid Walters Durham, Treas. B. S. C. . 16.67 



$344.02 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. A. THOMAS, Treas. 

The committee on time and place for the next session of 
;he Association reported as follows: Place. Seaboard; Time. 
Cuesday after the fourth Sunday in October, 1910; To 
[)reach the sermon, D. Cale or T. L. Brown. 

The Association adjourned. Benediction by Alexander 
Miller. 

Wednesday — Morning- Session. 

Devotional exercises were conducted by F. B. Hamrick. 
iter which the following resolution, with respect to putting- 
]he Biblical Recorder into every home within the bounds of 
he Association, was adopted: 



20 



THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION 



RESOLUTION. 

Resolved : 

(1) That the West Chowan Association join heartily with 
our Board of Missions in the effort to add 12,000 new subscrib- 
ers to the list of the Biblical Recorder, , and that we undertake 
to secure 600 of these subscribers in this session of the Associa- 
tion; that we recommend to each church of the Association to 
secure at least one new subscriber to every twenty of its mem- 
bership; we recommend that each church pass on this matter at 
its first conference after the Association and that the new sub- 
scribers be secured and forwarded at once to J. S. Farmer, Ral- 
eigh, N. C. 

(2) That in order to reach some of the people in our church- 
es who do not take the Recorder, and as an aid to our churches 
in keeping the Recorder and other phases of our work before their 
members, we recommend that the churches of this Association, 
take a club of te Monthly Bulletin printed by the Board of Mis- 
sions, each copy enclosing also a great Tract, at the rate of $1.00 
per dozen per year. 

(3) That this Association co-operate with the Board of Mis- 
sions in the location and operation of one of the simultaneous 
and uniform Schools of Pastors and Workers to be held each year|| 
within the boundaries of this Association, 

C. W. SCARBOROUOH, 
J. F. CALE, 
ALEXANDER MILLAR. 

J. F. Cale was appointed a member of the State Missionl 
Board; W. R. Haight, a member of the Home Mission 
Board; R. B. Lineberry, a member of the Foreign Mission 
Board. 

R. B. Lineberry presented the Historian's report, the ful- 
ness of which was commended in appropriate remarks hy 
C. W. Scarborough, J. S. Farmer, C. H. Jenkins, J. H 
Mathews, and was adopted. 

HISTORIAN'S REPORT. — CHANGES AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Mars Hills, Powellsville and Centre Grove form a field and se- 
cure Rev. N. H. Shepherd as pastor — preaching twice a month alj 
Mars Hill and one morning and afternoon service at each Pow- 
ellsville and Centre Grove. Rev. W. H. HoUowell resigns Ross 
and Bethany to take Sandy Run, giving twice a month preachiufl 
to each Sandy Run and Kelford. Rev. N. J. Todd resigns Sand]; 
Sun and Greens Cross Roads to attend Wake Forest College 
Rev. W. R. Haight supplies afternoon service at Capeharts am 
Merry Hill. AJioskie takes three Sundays and Bethlehem on< 
with Rev. Fred T. Collins as pastor at a salary increased t( 



WEST CHOWAiN ASSOCIATION. 



21 



$1,800. Revs. T. C. Keaton, of Murfreesboro; E. P. Sullivan, of 
Meherrin, and Jesse Blaiock, of Severn, Conway and Margarettes- 
ville have ail resigned to attend the Seminary. Rev. S. N. Wat- 
son resigned the Wine ,n and Union field, Aulander, Connari^rf i, 
Oak Grove and Morton's form a field and see. re Rev. James 

Long as pastor at a salary of $ Mt. Tabor secured Rev. 

P. A. Underwood as pastor for full time at salary of $1,000 and 
have built a pastor's homo at Mapleton. This pastor also serves 
Brantleys Grove in the afternoon. Rev. C. W. Scarborough, of 
Franklin, Va., is pastor of Menola, Rev. J. F. Coleson is pastor 
of Hebron. Robert's Chapel joins with Buckhorn in a field with 
Rev. F. B. Raymond as pastor. 

Colerain lost by death Deacon J. D. Evans, aged 72. Also we 
note the death of Colerain's oldest male member, P. B. Norvel, 
aged 81. Two young men of this church died of influenza — T. A. 
Raynor and V. B. Felton. Colerain lost one soldier in France 
who died of pneumonia and Christian Horbor lost in same way 
Willie R. Williford. 

Lewiston church felt keenly the loss in death of young Brother 
J. J. Peele. Chowan College lost by death three trustees: Albert 
Adkins, Abner W. Early and Roger W.atson. 

Brother Adkins was 8 7 years old, a member of Bethlehem 
church. He taught schools in early life — was a life-long friend 
of Chowan College, giving much of his means and influencing 
and aiding young ladies to attend college there. Brother Early, 
of Aulander, was also much interested in education — sending his 
children to college. He was closely identified with church work, 
attending nearly all the sessions of the Baptist State Convention 
and the Southern Baptist Convention. Brother Watson lived at 
Murfreesboro — was true to his church and the college. He seem- 
ed always to be pleasant. 

Colerain Church. 

Under persecution of the established church of England, 
through Wm. Berkley and others of Virginia, Baptists early in 
the eighteenth century crossed the Virginia line from under 
Berkely's dominion and settled northeastern Carolina. Shiloh of 
the Chowan Association is the oldest church of the Baptist faith 
in this section and, so far as this writer knows, of the State. In 
the West Chowan Association, Meherrin was founded in 172 9, 
Sandy Run in 1750, Cashie in 1770 and Colerain in 1780. 

Elder Jeremiah Dargan seems to have started the Colerain 
church, first known as Wiccacon. Miss Annie Moore, of 
Cashie neighborhood, was converted and desiring baptism accord- 
ing to the Baptist mode went to South Carolina to find some one 
to baptize her. While there she met Elder Jeremiah Dargan. 
They soon married and moved to Bertie County near Windsor. 
He was a remarkable man as a Christian and as a minister of the 
gospel, wonderfully blessed of the Lord in his work. Elder 



22 



THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION 



Bnrkitt says he planted the gospel at Cashie and was also a means 
of planting- the church at Wiccacon. This seems to have been 
prior to 17 80, as Joshua Freeman was converted "and joined 
there in 1777, but Wiccacon was than probably an arm of Cashie. 
This Wiccacon church was located about four miles northwest of 
Colerain. The writer has not been able to find the re.^Oids. 
About the year 182 9 this church was worshipping in what was 
called Colerain Meeting House, located just outside Colerain on 
the site of the present Colored Baptist church. There land was 
bought and a new house b^'ilt and dedicated in 1849. Rev. 
Abram Jones, of Edenton, preached the dedicatory sermon. In 
1883 land was procured at the present location, and a house of 
worship was built, which was dedicated in 18 92. Elder C. W. 
Scarborough preached the sermon. The corner-stone of the pres- 
ent building was laid in 19 08 and the house was completed, paid 
for and dedicated in June, 1911. The sermon on this occasion 
was preached by Elder M. P. Davis, a former pastor, through 
whose leadership the house was planned and built. 

Since the death of Elder Jeremiah Dargan, this church, as best 
we can gather, has been served by the following pastors: Elders 
Welsh, Hendry, Wm. Newborn, Jas. Bass, Reuben Lawrence, Jas. 
Nowell, Jeremiah Cale, Samuell Harrell, James Belk, 1 832-36, 
John Nowell 3 6-58, W. W. Kone 58-61, Edward Jordan Jan. to 
June '61, A. McDowell August 61-62, John Mitchell 62-67, B. B. 
Williams 67-77, T. W. Babb 77-9 0, C. P. Bogart July to November 
'90, C. N. Donaldson Dec 90-92, S. F. Bristoe '92-1901, W. P. 
Jordan 1901-1903, J. W. Ross 1903-05, S. B. Barnes 1905, M. 
P. Davis '0 6-Apr '10, F. A. Clark April-November 1910, J. O. Al- 
derman 11-13. R. B. Lineberry, the present incumbent, began 
his pastorate in January, 1913. 

The following are some who have served as clerks: Timothy 
Walton, Stephen Thatch, B. H. Ward, John Williams, J. L. Mor- 
ris, Etherton Wilson, J. W. Beasley, W. B. Watford, W. H. Har- 
rell, C. L. Northcott, H. D. Harrell, H. E. Wilson, C. B. Morris. 

The following have served as deacons: Joshua Freeman, John 
Britton, Hardy Hunter, Abraham Rhodes, David Valentine, 
Francis Evans, James Ward, Elijah Raynor, Solomon White, 
David Valentine, Lemuel Evans, John Wilson, James L. Morris, 
John L. Britton, Joseph Smith, Etherton Wilson, J. W. Beasley, 
Henry Pearce, George M. Matthew, H. D. Harrell, M. D. Harrell, 
D. C. Miller, J. D. Evans. The present board of deacons: D. R. 
Britton, chairman, A. D. White, E. White, Paul Harrell, H. E. Wil- 
son, A. A. Pearce, George T. Pearce, John M'. Britt, E. T. Fore- 
hand, C. R. Brinkley. 

Two preachers of eminent usefulness have gone out of this 
church — John Nowell and B. B. Williams. The following laymen 
have been of distinguished influence in the church: Joshua Free- 
man, John Nowell, Etherton Wilson, W. B. Watford. 

The association met at Wiccacon in 1786 and 1802. No rec- 
ord was attainable of associations at Colerain Meeting House. 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



23 



Association met here at this location in 189 3 and today, 1918. 

We have now a membership of 49 0. We have here a well- 
graded Sunday-school with nine classes and Home Department 
with 50 members and two branch schools. We have a general 
missionary society, a W. M. S., Sunbeams and B. Y. P. U. Our 
contributions to benevolence this year have been over $900 and 
the total contributions have been over $1,900. We have now 
in the government service — army, navy and marine, 2 6 young 
men. 

It was moved and carried that a committee of one in 
each county of this Association be appointed to take up the 
matter of raising the salaries of the pastors to a reasonable 
amount, it being understood that the salaries are entirely 
too low for the times and the service rendered by the pas- 
tors. J. H. Mathews was appointed for Bertie ; J. H. 
Stephenson, for Northampton; N. W. Britton, for Hertford. 

The following motion by C. W. Scarborough was passed: 
That J. F. Cale be appointed to represent this Association 
on the Board of Missions and that he be authorized to ask 
that the Board make an appropriation to upper Northamp- 
ton to supplement the pressing need of that section as repre- 
sented by Brother Cale. 

J. H. Mathews read the report on Missions, (1) State; 
(2) Home; (3) Foreign; (4) Women's Work. This report 
was spoken to by J. S. Farmer, James Long, C. W. Scarbor- 
ough, Alexander Miller, F. B. Hamrick, and was adopted. 

REPOKT ON MISSIOCVS, WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIAIION. 

We confidently hope that the "World's Peace", now being writ- 
ten, will open wide the gates of all lands to the spread of the Gos- 
pel and establishing God's Kingdom on earth. The principalities 
of mere men are heaps of ruins the world over — beyond repair, 
never to be rebuilt — but free governments will rise thereon. 

The sun never cleared the sky of clouds more completely than, 
the allied forces of right have cleared the places of earth of auto- 
cratic power. Amid falling empires and crumbling thrones, 
kings calling on the mountains to hide them from the wrath of 
outraged humanity, the divine command of twenty centuries 
gone, — "Go ye, into all the world and preach the gospel to every 
creature," speaks to us with the same clear call to duty and with 
the same compelling emphasis as it did to the Eleven, when by 
appointment they met Christ in the "Galileean Hills" to receive 
their commission as His Evangelists. From thence they went 
forth in His name. The centuries have brought us no higher 



24 



THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION 



obligation, and under its authority the Baptist missionaries have 
crossed every sea, invaded every land, encountered every hinder- 
ing cause and are today laboring in Africa, Argentina, Brazil, 
China, Italy, Japan, Mexico and numerous islands of the seas. 

The past year has been depressing. Absent sons and 
neighbors on foreign battle fields have touched our hearts and 
called for our sympathy. An almost overwhelming demand for 
public and private donations has appeared to strain our national, 
State and personal resources to the breaking point. But 
throughout it all the Baptists of West Chowan have come with 
cheerful hearts and determined purposes, sustained by the con- 
sciousness of duty well done to God and humanity. 

The war has taught us a great lesson, to think in larger terms 
and to give more freely. There can be from now on no fear of 
falling short in promised funds. Surely those who have given so 
much for the engines of destruction, can and will give even more 
to make the earth blossom as the rose and to lead men along the 
blessed paths of peace and righteousness. 

Foreign Missions. 

Naturally Foreign Missions come to mind when the subject of 
missions is mentioned. In dealing with the subject we can do 
little more than submit the general results of the year's work. 
Time and space prevent an elaborate report. 

This has been a prosperous year notwithstanding the world 
war. For the Foreign Mission fund the Southern Baptists have 
last year $852,923.73. This was near $300,000 more than the 
Southern Baptists ever gave to Foreign Missions in any one year 
before. It will be of interest to recite results. There were 6,- 
290 baptisms, 6 churches constituted, $152,874.16 contributed 
by the native Christians, 2 6 churches arriving at self-support; 
10,2 71 patients treated by medical missionaries. The contribu- 
tions by the native Christians were most gratifying. Our work 
may be well said to be firmly planted when the harvest is rich 
among those who have found Christ under our ministrations. 

The suggestion that our pastors and churches organize Mission 
Study Classes is a valuable one and we recommend it to all 
churches within our bounds. 

North Carolina Baptists gave to Foreign Missions last year 
$71,695.98. We have about 300,000 Batists in North Carolina. 
Make your own calculations. 

The Foreign Mission Board is planning its work this year on 
a basis of one and a half million dollars. We will have to nearly 
double our contributions to that fund if North Carolina Baptists 
are to do their part in raising this fund. North Carolina's part 
of that is $12 6,000. Shall we raise it? Will this Association do 
its part in reaching this high mark? 




Jro_ J_t^- 

WEST CHOWAN ASS0(CIATI0n7 '^'^^""TJ^ 25 

' ' 7 ' ' T-' ' ■-' 

' WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION APPORTIONTVfENT FOR 

1918-1919. 



Churches. 


CO 


02 


bi) o 


ly-School 
)ns. 


■phanage. 


rl ^ 


terial 






ate 
issic 


0^ .2 
o ..^ 


Sh m 






inis 
3liel 










o 


J3 111 

m g 




H 


^ Ph 







$2 40 


$225 


$270 


$12 


$2 50 


$96 


$25 


$1,118 


Ashley Grove . . _ 


62 


38 


62 


2 


75 


25 


4 


268 




i u 


50 


75 


5 




28 


1 A 


318 


Aulander 


o o 


190 


265 


12 


OCA 


90 


2 5 


1,0 57. 




Q (\ 
c< U 


55 


90 


5 


o U 


32 


o 

o 


350 


Bethany 


U 


37 


63 


3 


£* It 



20 


o 
D 


244 


Bethel 


45 


30 


50 


4 


100 


18 


5 


252 


Brantley's Gr. . . . 


54 


40 


60 


3 


50 


'22 


5 


234 




. 2 50 


200 


260 


12 


300 


100 


2 5 


1,152 




60 


37 


60 


3 


50 


24 


5 


239 






160 


200 


10 


350 


80 


20 


1,020 


Centre Gr 




45 


55 


2 


75 


22 


6 


260 


Christian Harbor 


tr A 

50 


45 


65 


3 


200 


20 


6 


389 


Connaritsa 


70 


55 


80 


5 


17 5 


28 


8 


421 






125 


200 


10 


400 


72 


20 


1,007 




1 A A 


80 


120 


5 


22 5 


40 


10 


580 




Z 


15 


25 


2 


n A 
90 


10 


4 


171 


Barley's Gr 




10 


15 


2 


15 


6 


4 


67 


Elam 


50 


40 


50 


4 


200 


20 


8 


372 


Galatla 


C A 


40 


60 


6 


K A 

50 


24 


■1 A 
10 


240 


Greene's X Roads 


50 


40 


50 


3 


50 


20 


5 


218 






65 


100 


4 


200 


32 


8 


489 


Hebron 


40 


25 


40 


3 


50 


20 


6 


184 


Hillside 




10 


15 


2 


10 


6 


3 


61 


Holly Grove .... 


6 5 


50 


75 


5 


110 


26 


6 


337 


Holly Springs . . . 


25 


20 


25 


2 


25 


10 


3 


110 






20 


25 


2 


o5 5 


10 


6 


120 




75 


60 


90 


5 


325 


30 


10 


595 


Kelford 


. 63 


50 


70 


4 


150 


25 


6 


367 




40 


30 


40 


3 


35 


16 


6 


170 




48 


35 


48 


3 


35 


19 


5 


193 




, 120 


90 


130 


4 


200 


48 


8 


600 


Margarettesville . 


. 25 


15 


25 


2 


25 


10 


3 


105^ 


Mars Hills 


. 165 


100 


175 


6 


175 


66 


8 


695' 




90 


70 


100 


4 


180 


36 


6 


486 




75 


50 


88 


3 


150 


30 


6 


402 




. 30 


25 


35 


2 


35 


12 


4. 


143 




. 60 


45 


75 


3 


100 


24 


5 


312 




, 250 


200 


260 


7 


350 


100 


10 


1,177 


Murfreesboro . . . 


. 155 


100 


160 


7 


175 


62 


10 


660 



26 



THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION 







30 


40 


2 


35 


16 


3 


16G 


Pine Forest . . . . 




10 


15 


2 


15 


6 


4 


67 


Pleasant Gr 


5 


40 


60 


^ 


120 


20 


5 


298 






75 


100 


4 


350 


36 


5 


660 






SO 


100 


4 


100 


40 


6 


430 






50 


88 


5 


175 


30 


7 


430 


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. 13 5 


12 5 


155 


6 


250 


54 


8 


833 






13 


20 


2 


25 


8 


3 


91 


Roanoke 


20 


13 


20 


2 


40 


8 


3 


106 


Robert's Chapel . 


. 2 


ICO 


22 5 


7 


210 


80 


10 


892 






90 


12 5 


3 


100 


50 


5 


498 


Sandy Run 


90 


70 


100 




180 


36 


5 


484- 




65 


50 


7 5 


4 


180 


26 


8 


368 




, 150 


125 


160 


5 


320 


60 


10 


830 


Siloam 


15 


10 


15 


2 


10 


6 


3 


61 


St. John 


40 


30 


4 5 


3 


75 


16 


5 


214 




100 


75 


120 


4 


110 


40 


5 


454 




225 


90 


125 


4 


175 


44 


6 


554 


Woodland 


110 


90 


125 


4 


175 


44 


6 


554 



Home Missions. 

Southern Baptists gave to Home Missions last year $567,501.72, 
The expenditures were made in regular departments — Co-opera- 
tive Missions with several State Mission Boards; Evangelism; 
Enlistment; Church Extension; Aid in church building; Mountain 
Schools; Cuba and Panama; Publicity, Foreigners, Indians and 
Negroes. 

Our Home Mission Board has rendered great service in connec- 
tion with the Northern Baptist Convention in doing religious 
work among our American soldiers in camps in America and in 
France. There has never been such deep need of the Gospel of 
Christ in our country as now. We rejoice to say that there has 
never been such ready response to that need. The Southern 
Baptist Convention instructed its Home Mission Board to project 
its work on a basis of $1,000,000 this year. The Home Mission 
Board is asking North Carolina Baptists to give $75,000 of this 
amount. Shall North Carolina Baptists meet this duty? We 
trust they will. We do not fear that West Chowan will meet 
its part. 

Your committee recommends: 

1. Tliat all our pastors and churches give frequent special 
seasons of preaching and praying for Home Missions, and of giv- 
ing to the work. 

2. That this Association gladly accept and apportion among 
the churches its increased apportionment for Home Missions. 

3. That our pastors and women be requested to arouse an 
interest in the unusually vital Home Mission Study books issued 
by the Home Mission Board, and to urge the formation of Mis- 
sion Study Classes in these books. 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 2 7 

I 

4. We urge that our pastors and workers order and make 
a larger use oli the splendid free Home Mission tracts issued by 
our Board. An order of a "one-each" package will enable each 
to determine for himself which tracts are suitable for his church. 
Orders for tracts and books should be addressed to the Publicity 
Department, Baptist Home Mission Board, Atlanta, Georgia. 

State Missions. 

We ome closer to our own doors when we talk of carrying 
the gospel to every creature in North Carolina. Our Board of 
Missions has that duty to perform. Fifty thousand dollars is 
asked for the whole State. Last year we gave to this impor- 
tant part of our work the sum of $4 5,2 73. Brother Walter N. 
Johnson has prepared an excellent statement of the work of the 
Board and as it was issued for the purposes of our Association, 
we copy the following: 

"The following is a tabulation of the work for this year on 
the mission field: Churches served 283, number missionaries 161, 
conversions 2,851, baptisms 1,765, received by letter 2,215, aver- 
age Sunday-school attendance 17,2 64, Mission Study Classes 77, 
Men in Mission Study Classes 256, houses of worship building 37, 
houes of worship built 11, churches organized 14, number dele- 
gates attending denominational meetings 1,208, number business 
meetings this year 1,72 pastoral conferences 133, every-member 
canvasses 178, sermons 11,028, for missions undesignated $2,- 
3 2 2.29, for State Missions $5,812.28, for Foreign Missions $2,- 
929.77, for Home Missions $2,542.28, for Education $1,190.94, 
for Sunday-school Missions $876.2 4, for Ministers' Relief $613.82, 
for Orphanage $5,995.79, other objects $19,043.42, amount 
raised for all church expenses except pastors' salary $31,477.80, 
Amount paid on pastors' salary $41,828.97." 

Under the head of State Missions are a number of church ac- 
tivities, which should receive our careful consideration and sup- 
port — Evangelization, the root of Baptist development; Church 
Building, without which there can be no successful evangeliza- 
tion: Sunday-schools, the very bed rock of any successful church 
work; the B. Y. P. U., without which we cannot teach our young 
people to do God's Avork on earth; the Woman's Missionary Union, 
which last year gave to Missions $12,614.90; then too we have 
the Schools of Pastors and Workers and the Colportage Depart- 
ment, which have been newly added. 

Your Committee beg leave to ask your indulgence for the want 
of a better study of our Mission situation and its allied work. 
I The departure of Brother Dowell, Chairman of the Committee, to 
I another field left us without a head and it has been oniy within 
! the last few days +hat the call was sent to us to prepare the re- 
I port. 

This is a critical and an inviting time for missionary worl? 
everywhere, abroad and at home. This war has driven the world 



28 



THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION 



to look for Christ, to appropriate Him, to make Him a real part, 
the whole of their lives. In the days of our dawning peace the 
Baptists of every land must gird themselves for the task of 
carrying the Protestant religion to the remotest corner of the 
earth. Autocratic power of a church is just as great a hindrance 
to the establishing of free governments, as is the autocratic power 
of a king. Protestantism is the hope of the world. Therin we 
find the true spirit of evangelizing the world. 

To this mighty task, the millions of Baptists the world over 
must come with men and money and send both blessed witl^ 
hymns and prayers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. H. MATTHEWS, 

For the Committee. 

R. B. Lineberry was appointed a delegate to the South- 
ern Baptist Convention ; F. R. Harris, J. H. Mathews, and C. 
I. Jenkins to the Baptist State Convention. 

Alexander Miller, D. Cale,, and W. R. Haight were ap- 
pointed a committee on the Order of Business, 

W. R. Haight moved that a vote of thanks be extended 
to Colerain Church and the community generally for the 
splendid hospitality furnished the representatives of the 
churches and the visitors during the session of the Associa- 
tion. 

Closing a splendid session, well represented, taking into 
consideration the change of time, on account of the epidemic 
of influenza, the Association adjourned, with prayer by R. 
B. Lineberry. 

C. H. JENKINS, Moderator. 
N. W. BRITTON, Clerk. 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 2 9 



OONTRIBUTIONS. 

State Missions , $ 4,067.93 

Home Missions 3,938.71 

Foreign Missions 4,922.20 

Sunday-school Missions 311.57 

Orphanage 8,312.16 

Christian Education 1,398.29 

Ministers' Relief 322.10 

Other Objects 4,421.36 



Total $27,694.32 

DIGEiST OF CHURCH UETTERS. 
Received. 

By baptism 266 

By letter _ 2 64 

By restoration 42 



Total 572 

Loss. 

By baptism 292 

By exclusion 69 

By death 123 



Total 484 

Gain 88 

Total membership 12,811 

Expenses for Home Purposes. 

Pastors' salaries i $24,545.00 

Buildings and repairs 20,484.37 

Poor 866.81 

Incidentals 6,383.03 

Sunday-schools 2,694.31 

Minute fund 139.81 



Total $55,113.33 



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CHURCHES AND CONSTITUTIONS. 



Churches 



Location and Date of Constitution. 



oskie 

lander 

iley's Grove 

cewville 

bhlehem 

hany 

mtley's Grove 

iickhorn 

jthel 

3eh art's 

ihie 

iter Grove 

9wan 

•istian Harbor 

eraine 

inaritsa 

eksville 

iway 

m 

"ley's Grove 

atia 

sen Cross Roads 

rrellsville 

5ron 

Iside 

lly Grove 

lly Springs 

rton's 

kson 

ford 

ker 

vrenee's 

nnston 

rgarettsville 

rs Hills 

tierrin 

unt Carmel 

ant Tabor 

rfreesboro 

Qoia 

rry Hill 

c Grove 

le Forest 

iecasi 

aasnt Grove 

vellsville 

>ublican 

h Square 

moke 

bert's Chapel 

is's 

'erside 

idy Run 

board 

)am 

ern 

John's 

ion 

titon 

odland 



Hertford County 1804 

Bertie County 1886 

Northampton County 1910 

Bertie County 191? 

Hertford County 1835 

Bertie County 1881 

Hertford County 1877 

Hertford County 1835 

Northampton County ,_1917 

Bertie County 1824 

Bertie County 1770 

Bertie County 1897 

Hertford County 1895 

Hertford County 188 1 

Bertie County 1780 

Bertie County 1789 

Northampton County 1892 

Northampton County 1905 

Northampton County 1844 

Hertford County 1917 

Northampton County . 1859 

Bertie County 1874 

Hertford County 1875 

Northampton County 1856 

Bertie County 1885 

Bertie County 1_1804 

Hertford County 1907 

Hertford County 1915 

Northampton County 1882 

Bertie County 1898 

Northampton County 1900 

Bertie County 1874 

Bertie County 1883 

Northampton County 1880 

Bertie County 1 1854 

Hertford County 1729 

Northampton County 1820 

Hertford County 1839 

Hertford County 1843 

Hertford County 1908 

Bertie County 1910 

Hertford County 1894 

Northampton County 1888 

Northampton County 1808 

Hertford County _J 1837 

Bertie County 1911 

Bertie County 1803 

Northampton County , 1854 

Northampton County 1885 

Northampton County 1848 

Bertie County 1804 

Bertie County 1913 

Bertie County 1750 

Northampton County 1889 

Bertie County 1885 

Northampton County 1896 

Hertford County 1883 

Hertford County 1885 

Hertford County 1873 

Northampton Coimty 1902 



I 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

West Chowan Baptist Association 

HELD WITH 

SEABOARD BAPTIST CHURCH 

NORTHAMPTON COUNTY 

OCTOBER 28 and 29, 1919 



The next session to be held with Mt. Tabor Church, Hertford 
County, beginning on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October, 1920 
To preach the sermon, E. G. Stephens or W. R. Haight 



RALEIGH 

Mutual Publishing Company, Printers 
1919 

I 



( 



I 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

West Chowan Baptist Association 

HELD WITH 

SEABOARD BAPTIST CHURCH 

NORTHAMPTON COUNTY 

OCTOBER 28 and 29, 1919 



The next session to be held with Mt. Tabor Church, Hertford 
County, beginning on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October, 1920 
To preach the sermon, E. G. Stephens or W. R. Haight 



RALEIGH 

Mutual Publishing Company, Printers 
1919 



LIST OF ORDAIXED mNISTERS. 



J. R. Mathews Aulander, N. C. 

D. Gale Potecasi, N. C. 

S. B. Barnes Merry Hill, N. C. 

T. T. Speight Windsor, N. C. 

. F. Gale Roxobel, N. G. 

R. B. Lineberry Colerain, N. G. 

T. L. Brown Lewiston, N. C. 

P. B. Raymond Gomo, N. G. 

J. W. Downey _ Severn, N. C. 

W. R. Haight Windsor, N. C 

W. H. HoUowell Keltord, N. G. 

P. A. Underwood Winton, N, C. 

Alexander Miller Jackson, N. G. 

James Long Aulandur. N. C. 

P. T. Gollins Ahoskie, N. G. 

R. T. White Gonway, N. G. 

D. W. Scarborough Franklin. Va. 

r. S. Grutchfield Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

A.. P. Mustian Winton, N. C 

Paul S.I Sykes Woodland, N. G. 

\&. T. Tanner Rich Square, N. C. 

^. H. Shepherd , Powellsville, N. G. 

OFFICERS. 

H. Jenkins, Moderator Aulander, N. G. 

R. T. White, Vice-Moderator Gonway, N. G. 

k W. Britton, Glerk Winton, N. G. 

W. A. Thomas, Treasurer Gofield, N. G. 

^ames Long, Historian Aulander, N. G. 

CO>OnTTEES. 

Missions — F. B. Raymond, E. Britt, G. W Scarborough, Hu- 
)ert Jenkins, F. T. Gollins, Mrs. P. M. Fleetwood. 

Ghristian Education — ^^W. R. Haight, Prof. Barbee, E. Cx. 
>tephenson, Jno. E. Vann, J. P. HoUoman. 

Ghristian Social Ser\ace — Jno. F. Gale, Paul Long, Dr. P. C. 
Jrittle, T. L. Brown, J. T. Harrell. 

Apportionment — James Long, G. B. Vaughan, J. H. Matthews, 
. T. Bolton, R. B. Lineberry, Alexander Melton. 



4 



THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



LIST OF DELEGATES. 

Ahoskie — S. E. Vaughan, W. L. Curris, C. G. Powell. 
Aulander — ^James Long, C. H. 'Jenkins. 

Ashely's Grove — J. K. Revelle, C. R. Revelle, Junius Warren. 
Askewville^ — John W. Evans, J. W. White. 
Bethlehem — ^W. A. Perry, W. A. Thomas. 
Bethany — J. G. Evans, J. C, Evans, H. L. Parker. 
Brantley's Grove — ^D. EL Minton, Joseph Hyatt, Guilford Hol- 
loman. 

Buckhorn — S. P. Winborne, R. O. Whitley, JI. J. Vann. 
Bethel — J. T. Edwards, J. E. Daniel. 
Capehart's — G. P. Perry, H. G. Evans, S. J. Warde. 
Cashier — T. Gilliam, J. H. Matthews, E. S. Gatling, W. T. Tad- 
lock. 

Center Grove — ^J. D. Earley, J, D. Jenkins. 

Christian Harbor — J. L. Blythe, J, H. Valentine, N. G. Hog- 
gard. 

Colerain — E. R. Evans, D. G. Baker, O. B. Hughes, C. B. Mor- 
ri®. 

Connaritsa — Josiah Earley, J. E. ' Matthews, J. S. Jenkins. 
Creeksville — J. R. Madrey, George Futrell, W. Davis. 
Conway — A. H. Martin, R. V. Nelson, J. H. Odom. 
Elam — T. J. Taylor, Phillip Reid, Bi S. Sykes. 
Earley's Grove — J. D. Earley, M. A. Johnson. 
Galatia — ^W. W. Jones, J. E. Barnes, Kinchen Taylor, W. F. 
Britton. 

Green Cross Roads — D. R. Mizelle, G. W. Castellow, J. A. 
White. 

Harrellsville — E. D. Callis, B. N. Sykes. 

Hebron — H. T. Vann, P. M. Futrell, J. E. Griffin. 

Hillside — -Frank Harden. 

Holly Grove — P. A. Holloman, J. L. Barnes. 
Holly Springs — 

Horton's — H. W. Green, J. C. Jenkins, AV. K. Powell. 
Jackson — ^R. W. Fleetwood, P. J. Long. 
Kelford — George T. Parker, C. L. L. Cobb, W. C Evans. 
Lasker — R. C. Lassiter, J, H. Davis. 

I^wrence's — J. W. Langdale, W. L. Thompson, T. R. Older. 
Lewiston — W. H. Taylor, W. Mitchell, T. S. Lassiter, W. Mod 
lln. 

Margarettsville — J. G. Stance!!, J. S. Gay. 
Mars Hill — G. H. Powell, J. T. Harrell, John Alston. 
Meherrin — ^J. K. Parker, L. B. Jenkins, C. H. Chitty. 
Mount Carmel — J. G. Joyner, E. J. Smith, R. B. Madrey. 
Mount Tabor — J. A. Parker, E. Brett, C. W. Stephenson. 



WEST CHOWAX ASSOCIATION 



5 



Murfreesboro — R. Sewell, C. M. Forehand, J. D. Babb. 
Menola — C. S. Edv/ards, H. G. Snipes, A. J. Vinson. 
Merry Hill — H. B. Holloman, J. T. Keeter, Joe White, Xorman 
Keeter. 

Oak Grove — A. E. Saunders, W. M. Marsh. B. F. Lassiter. 
Pine Forest — W. P. Garner, J. H. Camp. 
Potecasi — J. R. Baugham, C. T. Cook, C. T. Sumner. 
Pleasant Grove — C. A. Dunning ,M. L. Taylor, .James X. 
Baugham. 

Powellsville — M. S. Rayner, .J. E. R. Perry, L. H. Freeman. 
Republican — A. V. Cobb, .i . R. Butler, S. B. Parker, W. F 
Earley. 

Rich Square — Wilber Bolton, .J. P. Holloman, .J. T. Bolton, 
W. P. Benthal. 

Roanoke — John Braswell, W. F. Nelson. 

Robert's Chapel — M. B. Johnson, B. D. Stephenson, J. C. Tay- 
lor. 

Ross's — W. W. Mitchell, L. G. Evans, G. C. Castellow, L. R. 
White. 

Riverside — James Lee, J. E. Holder. 

Sandy Run — C. C. Tyler, E. L. Bishop, A. P. Liverman. 
Seaboard — J. T. Long. C. P. Stephenson, j. R. Crocker. 
Siloam — B. S, Leggett, G. D. Leggett. 
Severn — R. E. Madrey, G. D. Barnes, J. J. White. 
St. John's — €. B. Vaughan, J. C Beale. 
Union — Archie Horton, Bruce Dukes. 
Winton — J. E. Vann, P. E. Shaw, W. H. Lassiter. 
Woodland — W. E. Whisenant, S. X. Blanchard, G. M. Hollo- 
man. 



6 



THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE W. M. U. WEST OHOWAN 
ASSOCIATION. 

The 2 5th annual meeting of the W. M. U. of the West Chow- 
an Association was held with Buckhorn Baptist Church, Como, 
N. C, September 9, 1919. The first session opened at 10:30 
o'clock. Devotional exercises were led by Mrs. E. B. Vaughan. 
She stirred and filled our hearts with humility and gratitude to 
our Father who has so tenderly watched over us since we last 
met. She earnestly begged that each one of us be witnesses for 
Him. 

Then we were cordially welcomed by Miss Annie Sue Win- 
borne. Miss Eunice Watson, of Roxobel, in behalf of the Union, 
made the response. 

The President recognized the following visitors: Mrs. W. N. 
Jones, of Raleigh, and Mrs. J. W. Whitley, of Murfreesboro, 

Mrs. W. R. Haight, of Windsor, gave us a splendid talk on 
"Our Associational Aims — How to Reach Them." She urged 
each member to know the standard of excellence and put it in 
practice; and begged that we pray for the work in our local 
churches. 

Mrs. D. A, Day, of Murfreesboro, read to us an excellent pa- 
per, "A Program for Colored Evangelization," While this has 
not been a very popular subject she made us feel that it is im- 
portant. Also stated a few things that had been done for the 
negroes. 

We counted ourselves fortunate, indeed, to have with us Mrs. 
Jones, our State Union President, solan invitation was extend- 
ed to the men to come in while she gave us a talk, "A Program 
for World Evangelization." She said that we will have to re- 
build our civilization and this' must be done on the foundation 
of Jesus. We must strike to make the world ready for the com- 
ing of our King, but this cannot be done unless we carry out 
His command. Everywhere the doors are open and there is a 
greater opportunity for service today than ever before. We 
ought to make our lives count in the evangelization of tha 
world. 1 

Miss Una White, President of the Union, gave us a brief sketch 
of the year's work, rhowing that the women of the Association 
are making progress in the things of the Kingdom. 

The Secretary read the minutes of last meeting and called' the 
roll of societies. 

The Treasurer's report showed a balance in bank of $9 3.53 
for Miss Johnson's salary and expense fund. 

She also stated that the Union had raised $8,190.07 for all 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



7 



! objects. Under the head of new business a committee was ap- 
i pointed to decide upon a name for our memorial. 

Mrs. R. B. Lineberry, not being able to attend, wrote a letter 
to the Union offering her resignation as Junior Superintendent. 
Same was accepted. 
1 The following committees were appointed: ' 

Nomination — Mrs. E. B. Vaughan, M^s. J. C. Jenkins and Mrs. 
A. D. White. 

Resolutions — Miss Eunice Watson, Mrs. H. V. Parker and 
Mrs. C. J. Vaughan. 

Time and Place — Mrs. P. C. Jenkins, Mrs. Lonnie Jenkins and 
Mrs. Myers. 

Obituaries — Mrs. N. G. Phelps, Mrs. J. C. Jenkins and Mrs. 
Warde. 

Literature — Miss Mary Thomas, Miss Ruth Vann and Miss An- 
nie Sue Winborne. 

The Union then adjourned for dinner. 

Afternoon Session. 
I The afternoon session was opened by singing "Onward, Chris- 
I tian Soldiers." Devotional exercises were conducted by Mrs. 
Myers, of Ahoskie. 

The Superintendents for the County Unions gave very interest- 
ing reports of their work for the past year. 

Mrs. W. N. Jones spoke on the $75,000,000 campaign, show- 
ing the why, how, when, causing every woman to feel she want- 
ed to have a part in the great campaign. Our President offered 
a prayer for this object. 

Mrs. E. A. Huggins, of Rich Square, read a message of love 
and greeting from Miss Pearl Johnson. She made a special 
prayer for Miss Johnson, that she may have strength to do her 
work faithfully among the heathens in China. 

We were delighted to have a solo from Miss Claude Stephen- 
son, who is head of the voice department of Chowan College. 

The Nominating Committee made the following report: 

The Nominating Committee recommends to the Union the fol- 
lowing officersi: 

Associated Superientendent — Miss Una White. 

Assistant Superintendent — Mrs. W. R. Haight. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Mrs. T. A. Rayner, 
* Junior Band Superintendent — Mrs. W. R Haight. 

Y. W. A. Leader — Mrs. P. A. Underwood. 

Committee on Time and Place made the following report: 

Ashley's Grove, last Wednesday in July, 1920. 

Committee on Naming Memorial reported: 

After careful consideration, your committee feels that as we 
have a; missionary of our own on the foreign field, it is befitting 



I 



8 



THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



that we should name our memorial for her, hoping that it will 
be an ispiration to her to do even better work in the future 
than she has in the past. Therefore, we suggest the name of 
"The Pearl Johnson Memorial." 

Respectfully submited, ' 

MRS. W R. HAIGHT, ' 
MRS. VERONA HOGGARD, ■ 
MRS. E. B. VAUGHAN, 
MRS. E. A. HUGGINS. 

The following report of the Obituary Committee was read by ■' 
Mrs. J. C. Jenkins: 

Death has been in our midst, reaping many of our worthy sis 
ters. We cherish their memory, but give them back to Him who 
doeth all things well. We trust they are in a home "not made 
with hands eternal in the heavens." 
Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. N. G. PHELPS. 
,MRS. JIMMIE WARD, 
MRS. J. C. JENKINS. 

After all the committees had reported, we sang a hymn and 
were dismissed with prayer by Rev. J. W. Whitley. 

MISS UNA WHITE, Asso. Supt. 
MRS. T. A. Rayner, Sec.-Treas. 



PROCEEDINGS 



Seaboard, N. C, October 28, 1919. 

The West Chowan Baptist Association met this day in its 
thirty-seventh annual session with the Seaboard Baptist 
Church, Northampton County. 

After devotional exercises, conducted by M. L. Kesler, 
the Moderator, C. H. Jenkins, called the Association to 
order. In the absence of the Clerk, R. B. Lineberry Avas 
elected Assistant Clerk. 

After the enrollment of degelates, the following- officers 
were elected for the ensuing year: C. H. Jenkins, Modera- 
tor; R. T. White, Vice-Moderator; N. W. Britton, Clerk; 
W. A. Thomas, Treasurer; James Long, Historian. 

The following visitors were recognized: M. L. Kesler, 
L. Johnson, Mr. Hudson, G. P. Harrell. 

The report on Christian Social Service was read by 
James Long and was discussed by M. L. Kesler on the 
Orphanage work, L. Johnson on ministerial relief. The re- 
port was adopted. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN SOCIAIi SERVICE. 

Christianity was born in a Pharisaical atmosphere and was 
fostered in its early years in a stoical one. The highest concep- 
tion of piety the natural world has been able to reach has been 
the denial of the body. It was therefore natural that early 
Christianity should have become ascetic. The leaven of the 
larger import of the Christian religion, of necessity, was a slow 
development. 

Only, in the last few decades have Christian people begun to 
relate the whole man to religion and to seek to put religion in 
possession of the whole man. We recognize, today, that there 
can be no rounded Christianity that does not include all the ele- 
ments and relations of life and seek to minister to the same. 
The first great commandment is, "Thou shalt love the Lord thy 
God with all the mind, soul, strength. . . ." The second r^ 
like unto it, "Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself." 

Orphanage Work. 

In various ways through the ages there have been spasmodic 
efforts to apply Christianity to the whole man but they did not 



10 



THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



live. They were prophetic of the rising consciousness. Suffer- 
ing has always touched the Christian heart, but it remained for 
the cry of the child to enlist the heart and open the hand of 
Christendom in loving ministry and sacrifice for the unfortu- 
nate and needy. "And a little child shall lead them." A few 
pioneer, prophetic Baptist spirits in North Carolina, in the year 
1884, caught the vision and with boldness of faith led in the 
organizing of the Thomasville Baptist Orphanage. They build- 
ed better than they knew. 

From that day of small things it has grown to be the second 
largest orphanage in the South, the only other one larger, being 
the Buckner Baptist Orphanage of Texas. Today there are en- 
rolled at Thomasville and the Kennedy Home about 5 50 chil- 
dren and as many more almost as needy are knocking at its 
doors. The orphanage combines the features of a good home 
life, an educational institution, an industrial training school, and 
a Christian church. 

The annual budget is now over $90,000 per year. Our people 
have never allowed the Orphanage treasury to go empty. But 
in these days of high cost of living, we must see to it that, at 
least, we increase our gifts proportionately, and more; we need 
to make it possible for the management to heed the appeal of 
other needy children that are pleading for compassion. 

The "Thanksgiving" offering in our churches has become an 
established institution with us. It is one of the days of "hila- 
rious" giving in our congregations. The "One Day for the Ovv 
phanage" thank offering is suggestive and should be followed up. 
All of our Sunday-schools should set apart one Sunday in the 
month for the Orphanage. 

Charity and Children has become a part of North Carolina 
Baptist life. Either by private subscription or in clubs it ought 
to go into every Baptist home in the State. It is no competitor 
of any other paper, but fills a place all its own. 

Hospital. 

It is to be hoped that it will not be long before the Baptists 
of North Carolina will provide adequate hospital facilities for 
caring, in a Christian way, for our suffering who need such min- 
istry. This is a type of benevolence we have been all too slow 
in appreciating. It is a Christian obligation and we wrong our- 
selves and our suffering brother in failing to meet the call. 

Ministers' Relief. 

In this work North Carolina Baptists have done about as 
much as those of our sister states. Our work is to be merged 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



11 



in the larger program of the Southern Baptist Convention. Dr. 
Lunsford is leading in the raising of five millions for this work. 
Let us do our best, not our part, for we have been tardy in rec- 
ognizing our old preachers. It is a reproach upon us, it is the 
stain of ingratitude. The unworthy will impose but the worthy 
are so many and so deserving that we ought to think of nothing 
but these. If we all co-operate heartily with the larger program 
our worn out toilers in the vineyard of the Lord will be better 
provided for, as they linger in the shadows awaiting their re- 
ward. 

P. M,. FLEETWOOD, 
JAMES LONG, 

Committee. 

B. D. Stephenson and P. M. Fleetwood were appointed a 
committee to receive the minute fund. 

On motion, the Association adjourned for dinner, with 
prayer by J. W. Downey. 

Afternoon Session 

The Association reconvened at 2 o'clock, and was led in 
prayer by C. W. Scarborough. 

The report on Christian Education was read by R. B. 
Lineberry, and was spoken to by R. B. Lineberry, J. H. 
Mathews, and others. 

Several brethren from the Chowan Association were in- 
vited to seats in the body to participate in the discussion 
with reference to the matter of moving Chowan College to 
another location. On motion, the speeches on this subject 
were limited to five minutes. 

On motion, the following resolution, by Alexander Miller^ 
was introduced, and discussed by Alexander Miller, D. C. 
Barnes, C. W. Scarborough, P. S. Vann, L. Johnson, and 
others, and was adopted : 

Resolved, That the Board of Trustees of Chowan College be 
and are authorized and empowered to remove the college from 
Murfreesboro to some more convenient and accessible location to 
be selected by them, if they shall decide that a removal of the 
college will subserve its best interests; and in event of a removal 
they are authorized to sell and dispose of the present site and 
property of the college to the best advantage. 



12 



THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



HE PORT ON CHRISTIAN E I >U CATION. 
1. Sunday-schools. 

The Sunday-school has a growing importance in all kingdom 
enterprises with any of us who will thoughtfully consider the 
situation. If our children are to grow up in the "Nurture and 
admonition of the Lord," they must acquire this training, large- 
ly, through the Sunday-ochool. If our church members are to 
know God's will concerning them as His followers, they must get 
this information, mostly, from the Word of God as taught in the 
Sunday-school. What a tremendous responsibility — to the 
saved and to the unsaved — to teach the Word in its purity and 
to teach it efficiently. 

As Southern Baptist, we, today, face the greatest task that the 
ages have presented to us. Our sincerity of undertaking the 
task is measured by the "Seventy-five Million Program." Of 
course we are counting that a good proportion of this work will 
be done in and through the Sunday-school, because the Sunday- 
school is the working and the paying element of the church. We 
need, however, to consider what this campaign is expected to ac- 
complish for the Sunday-school. This great program contem- 
plates adding to the Sunday-school enrollment 1,500,000. This 
will mean at least 15,000 enrolled in the West Chowan Sunday- 
schools instead of some S,000 as at present. We are also look- 
ing for at least $2,500,000 to be contributed through our Spe- 
cial Days in the Sunday-schools for the general causes in this 
program.. For our association, this will mean some $15,000 in- 
stead of $G,000. Then it is planned in the program that we 
will secure 150,000 diploma holders in our Teacher Training 
Course. This means that all our Sunday-school teachers are to 
take a course in Normal Manual. It is furthermore in the pro- 
gram to have 2 5,000 senior and adult and 10,000 intermediate 
registered classes in our organized class department, with at 
lease 5,000 standard classes. To this end every class in these 
departments must register with our Sunday-school department 
at Nashville. 

To accomplish this Sunday-school program your committee 
would recommend the six "F" suggestions of W. D. Hudglns, ot 
Tennessee: First find 'em. This will require a religious census. 
You must have the information and this is the only sure way to 
obtain it. Second, "fetch 'em." When you have found who and 
where they are, go after them — teachers, class officers, pastor 
and others, using every available means to enlist them in the 
Sunday-school. Third, "fix 'em." If you succeed in bringing 
them in, be sure to fix them in a proper place. This means that 
the school shall be properly graded with reference to age and 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



13 



sex. Fourth, "fasten 'em." To do this you must make your 
school so attractive that they cannot afford to be absent. For 
this you will require a suitable building, properly equipped and 
the officers and teachers trained for their work. Fifth, "follow 
'em." Follow up the absientees, if any. Have regular, syste- 
matic plans hunting up the absentees and bringing them back: 
to the school. Sixth, "finish 'em." This means that your worcv 
is not completed and you are not to be satisfied till they are con- 
verted and properly related to the activities of the church and 
trained for service. So much for the seventy-five million of the 
Sunday-school task. 

3. Education. 

For training our children in the elementary branches we rely 
almost exclusively on the state schools. At this stage of the 
training we can very well afford to trust to the state., because 
nearly all the children then are in the home and under home 
Influences, except during the school hours, and they have thJ 
advantages of the parent's Sunday-school on the Lord's day. Two 
suggestions are worth keeping in mind first, as we rely upon 
the state for the elementary training, we should as citizens of the 
state, demand that the state authorities appropriate for primary 
schools a sufficient proportion of state's educational fandsi to 
secure elementary training for all the children. Second, as in- 
terested citizens, we should see to it that the trustees of the pri- 
mary schools employ good moral. Christian teachers. When we 
reach the high school grades of training we divide between the 
state schools and denominational schools. There are three rea- 
sons for having denominational high schools: First, pupils then 
have reached the age where they need some distinctive Christian 
training along with the intellectual training. This the state 
can not give. Second, g.ome pupils, for their high school train- 
ing, have to go away from home and therefore they need a dis- 
tinctive Christian influence to safeguard the religious life while 
away from their Christian parents. Third, some state school- 
trained teachers have not encouraged children of Christian par- 
ents to attend the denominational college of the Christian par- 
ent's preference. We have therefore, in North Carolina, 14 Bap- 
tist high schools, with a property valuation of $349,000.. There 
were enrolled in these high schools last year 2,243 pupils. 

For that portion of our Baptist children who take collegiate 
training we have to provide more fully, because practically all 
this training is secured away from home and at an age when 
intellectual culture largely affects the religious bias — and there- 
fore destiny — of human life. For this part of our work we have 
three Baptist colleges in North Carolina — iWake Forest for boys 



14 



THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



and Meredith and Chowan for girls. These colleges have prop- 
erty valued at $1,142,690. They enrolled last year 906 pupils. 

Of these three colleges, we are the more intersted in Chowan 
College because of its location and its direct influence upon the 
Christian polity of this dearly beloved section of our great state. 
Humanly speaking, as Baptists in this northeast section, we owe 
so nearly all to Chowan College that not to be loyal to it is the 
height of ingratitude. We have there this year a faculty of 15 
teachers and 97 pupils. We are to be congratulated that we of- 
fer as good intellectual training as can be had with the means 
and equipment at our disposal and because the moral standard 
of our college is so well up to our very ideal: Our teachers are 
all Christian, Baptist Christian. Not only is there a good safe 
Christian influence exerted upon those who are taught, but they 
are taught the principles of Christian service, so that when they 
go back to the old home church they will love it better and 
serve it more efficiently. 

3. Ministerial Education. 

In the Baptist high schools in our state last year there were 
55 ministerial students. At Wake Forest there were 62 minis- 
terial students, and at Meredith and Chowan there were six stu- 
dent volunteers. On 45 of the ministerial students at Wake 
Forest we spent $4,107.45 and for the student volunteers we: 
spent $2 79.60. We also spent $1,500 on North Carolina stu- 
dents at Louisville Seminary. 

Last year we put on an intensive campaign in the state to raise 
$1,000,000 for the equipment and endowment of our Baptist 
schools in the state. Of this amount our association was asked 
to raise $127,000. Dr. R. T. Vann tells your committee that we 
have subscribed to this fund $38,971.63, leaving a balance un- 
scribed of $88,028.37. Now this million dollar campaign is 
merged into the seventy-five million campaign with missions, 
orphanage, hospitals and all. We must not forget, however, 
that it is necessary to subscribe and pay the balance of this 
million dollar fund for this reagon: when we raise $825,000 of 
this fund in the state. The New York Board of Education has 
promised to add $17 5,000. If we stop where we are now we 
lose the $175,000. 

In conclusion we would fasten upon your minds that now, as 
never before in history, the eyes of the world are turned ex- 
pectantly to democratic America — made democratic in accord- 
ance with the Baptist interpretation of the teaching of Jesus. 
Not only is there an open door, but the Macedonian world cry is 
for the goods we Baptist have. It is more than ever Baptist day. 



I 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



15 



Not only are the eyes of the world toward us, but the eyes of 
the Lord are upon us to see if we shall he truei to our trust. We 
would remind you that in this world call for Baptist statesmen 
as leaderSi we have planned in the seventy-five million campaign 
to do more for our Baptist educational institutions than their 
combined property is now worth. To your tents O, Israel. Let 
us leave no stone unturned to get ready for every Baptist to do 
his level best on November 30th. 

And when we have subscribed our $375,000 let us arrange 
for the balance of the $127,000 of this $375,000 to be paid in 
cash, war stamps or signed notes and forwarded to Dr. R. T. 
Vann by December 31st. We will thus make available, at once, 
these funds for our needy Baptist educational institutions and 
add the $175,000 from the New York Board of Education. 



The Committee on Hospitality now assigned homes to the 
delegates, and the Association adjourned, with prayer by 
James Long. 



After song service, the annual sermon was preached by 
D. Cale, from Titus 2 :10. 

R. B. Lineberry presented the report on apportionment, 
the adoption of which was postponed until tomorroAV. 



R. B. LINEBERRY, 
J. H. MATTHEWS, 

Committee. 



Tuesday — Evening Service 



APPORTIONMENT FOR 1920. 



iChurches. 



Total. 
$3,300.00 



Ahoskie 

Aulander 

Ashley's Grove . 

Askewville 

Bethlehem 

Bethany 

Brantley's Grove 

Buckhorn 

Bethel .... 

Capehart's 

Cashie 

Center Grove . . . 
Christian Harbor 

Colerain 

Connaritsa 



3,000.00 
1,500.00 

600.00 
1,500.00 

600.00 

300.00 
2,700.00 
■ 600.00 

600.00 
3,300.00 

600.00. 

600.00 
3,000.00 
1,500.00 



16 



THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



Conway 2,100.00 

Creeksville . 600.00 

Elam • 1,500.00 

Early's Grove 12 0.00 

Galatia '. 1,500.00 

Green's Cross Roadc 600.00 

Harrellsville ,. . . . 1,800.00 ; 

Hebron 1,500.00 I 

Hillside 150.00 

Holly Grove 600. 0'J 

Holly Springs 2 4 0.00 [ 

Hortons 300.00 ' 

Jackson 2,100.00 

Kelford 1,500.00 

Lasker 600.00 

Lawrence Cross Roads . 300.00 [ 

Lewiston 1,500.00 

^^^argarettsville 600.00 i 

Mars Hill 1,800.00 i 

Meherrin 2,100.00 i 

Menola 1,500.00 

Merry Hill 600.00 

Mt. Carmel 1,500.00 

Mt. Tabor 3,300.00 

Murfreesboro 900'.00 

Oak Grove 600.00 

Pine Forest 150^00 

Pleasant Grove 900.00 

Potecaci 1,500:00 ' 

Powellsville 600.00 

Republican 1,800.00 

Rich Square 2,100.00 

Riverside 3 00.00' 

Roanoke 150.00 

Robert's Chapel 2,100.00 

Ross' . . .1 1,800.00 

- Sandy Run . 1,800.00 

Seaboard 2,100.00 

Severn 2,100.00 

Siloam : . . 150.00, | 

St. John 600.00 I ^ 

Union 1,800.00 f 



I 

i 
( 

II 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



17 



Winton . 
Woodland 



2,700.00 
2,100.00, 



J. P. HOI>AMAN, 

C. W. SCARBOROUGH, 

C. C. HOGGARD, 

DR. WAYLAND MITCHELL, 

D. R. BRITTON, 
J. P. GRIFFIN, 



Committee. 



The Association adjourned, with praj^er by L. Johnson. 



Devotional exercises were conducted by James Long*. 

On motion, it was ordered that three dollars be refunded 
to Bethany Church, said amount having been paid to the 
minute fund last year and no minutes received by that 
church. 

The Apportionment Committee's report was taken up and 
discussed further and was adopted. 

The Committee on Time, Place, and Preacher for the next 
session, consisting of J. H. Mathews, J. E. Vann, J. W. Dow- 
ney, and R. B. Lineberry, reported as follows : Place — Mount 
Tabor. Time^ — Tuesday and Wednesday after the fourth 
Sunday in October, 1920. To preach the sermon — E. G. 
Stephens, with W. U. Haight, alternate. 

The following appointments were made : W. R. Haight, a 
member of the Home Mission Board; R. B. Lineberry, a 
member of the Foreign Mission Board; Alexander Miller, a 
member of the State Mission Board ; T. L. Brown, a delegate 
to the Southern Baptist Convention. 

R. B. Lineberry presented the Historian's report, which 
report was adopted. 



Rev. N. H. Shepherd has resigned his field of work at Mars 
Hill, Powellsville and Center Grove. Mars Hill has installed 
electric lights. Rev. J. H. Barnes has resigned at Bethany and 
accepted Capeharts with the rest of his field. Greene's Cross 
Roads is planning to build a new house of worship and Riverside 
Is planning Sunday-school rooms. This field has increased pas- 
tor's salary. Rev. T. E. Brown has been supplying at Hillside 



Wednesday — Morning Session 



HISTORIAN'S REPORT. 



18 



THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



in addition to his other field. Rev. S. B. Barnes resigned Law- 
rence to give two Sundays to Lasker. Earleys on his field has 
built a house of worship. Rev. A. P. Mustian is now pastor at 
Winton and Union. Ahoskie is building a $5,500 pastor's home. 
Rev. F. T. Collins has been called for fuU time at an increased 
salary. This leaves Bethlehem out of this field. Rev. J. W. 
Downey is pastor of Severn, Conway, Potecasi, Creeksville and 
Margarettsville. Rev. J. W. Whitley is pastor at Murfreesboro 
with increased salary. He also serves Hebron. Rev. C. W. 
Scarborough is pastor at Woodland. Rev. J. F. Cale resigned 
at Rich Square and took Pleasant Grove and Menola. Rev. E. G, 
Stephen is pastor of Rich Square. Colerain, Harrellsville and 
Christian Harbor have increased salary. There has also been 
increase of salary at Cashie and Askewville. Rev. H. G. Bryant 
has resigned Meherrin. Rev. Alexander Miller's field has in- 
creased salary. Seaboard has a beautiful new brick house of 
worship dedicated free of debt. Bethel also dedicated free of 
debt a house of worship this year. Elam is also building. 
Bethel Church felt keenly their loss in the death of J. W. Con- 
well and M. L. Daniel. The latter was a faithful worker in the 
organization of this church. Colerain lost by death three very 
old members: Mariah Boswell, aged 87; and Mr. and Mrs. M. D. 
Harrell, aged 76 and 81. Thisi church had also two worthy 
young men to die in service of the country — Ramon Brinkley at 
a camp in Georgia and Paul Harrell, Jr., in France. Christian 
ilarbor lost a worthy young brother in France — Willie WiUiford. 
Bro. J. D. Lowe's death was keenly felt at Harrellsville. He 
was deacon, clerk, sexton and Sunday-school teacher. 



R. B. Lineberry, our delegate to the last session of the 
Southern Baptist Convention, made a very interesting re- 
port of that session. 



R. B. LINEBERRY. 



REPORT ON CHURCH STATISTICS. 



Received. 



By baptism . . 
By letter . . . . 
By restoration 



613 
244 
67 



Total 



924 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION I'J 

liOSS. 

By letter 2 8? 

By exclusion 102 

By death 177 

Total *' 56G 

Cain 358 

Total membership 12,972 

Expenses for Home Purposes. 

Pastors' salaries $28,869.00 

Buildings and repairs 11,700.88 

Poor 510.19 

Incidentals 4,9 03.03 

Sunday-schools 3,758.57, 

Minute fund 165.74 

Total $49,907.41 

Contributions . 

State Missions $ 5,676.16 

Home Missions 4,205.20 

Foreign Missions 5,940.28 

Sunday-school Missions 416.97 

Orphanage . . . 9,826.20 

Christian Education 15,390.87 

Ministers' Relief 421.73 

Other Objects 7,816.65 

Associational Missions 71.39 



Total $49,765.45 



This report was adopted. 

The Report on Missions — ^F.oreign Missions, presented by 
P. M. Fleetwood; Home Missions, by C. G. Powell; State 
Missions, by Alexander Miller — was now considered. 

On the general subject of missions, L. Johnson addressed 
the Association, 

The report on Woman's Work was spoken to by L. John- 
son, R. B. Lineberry, C. W. Scarborough, and the entire 
report on missions was adopted. 

On motion, the Clerk is instructed to withhold the publi- 
cation of the minutes until the reports on State Missions 
and Woman's Work are prepared and sent in to him. 



20 



THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



REPORT OIV FOREIGN mSSIONS. 

Any just appreciation of the Foreign Mission Board's work and 
responsibilities, and any effort to provide adequate resources 
for this work must be based upon a knowledge and just consid- 
eration of the extensive fields which the Board is cultivatin 
the conditions on these fields, the variety of work that is being 
conducted, and the necessities of the work which we have al- 
lowed to accumulate through the years. 

The Foreign Mission Board of the Southern BaptiSit Conven- 
tion is charged with propagating the gospel in Japan, China, 
Africa, Italy, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Chile, etc. Such 
numerous and extensive mission fields put this work out of com- 
parison with anything else we are doing. 

On these fields there are vaster numbers of human beings than 
the human mind can grasp. The population in these lands 
mounts into the hundreds of millions, — ^ome of them white, 
some black, some yellow, but all of them the object of God's 
love. 

The condition of these millions as compared with the people 
whom we know adds emphasis to the appeal of the great field 
and the great numbers. These multitudes, whether in pagan 
or papal lands, are handicapped by ignorance and superstition, 
by physical suffering, and above all by aggravated sin, for which 
they have found no remedy. If there is any pity in the Chris- 
tian heart, it ought to be provoked by the deplorable conditions 
under which millions of our fellow beings on these mission 
fields are spending their lives while we enjoy the blessings of 
the gospel and a Christian civilization which it has produced. 

But we shall not properly appraise Foreign Missions if we 
overlook the fact that it includes the evangelization of the lost, 
the education of the ignorant, the training of the saved, the 
healing' of the sick, the housing of feeble mission churches. In- 
deed, all that we are doing at home through State mission 
boards, home mission boards, education boards, orphanages, san- 
itaria and the rest we are doing through the Foreign Mission 
Board. No adequate provision can be made for a work so ex- 
tensive, f:o varied and comprehensive if we put Foreign Missions 
on a parity with any single Christian enterprise which we are 
conducting at home. 

There is another fact, aiid a great fact it is, which must be 
taken into consideration if we are to meetiour obligations to this 
great work at this time. The war immeasurably enlarged our in- 
ternational Christian duty. The heroic efforts and sacrifices 
which we made to set the world free from the extraordinary re- 
straints of autocracy creates for us a new and larger duty to 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



21 



promote everywhere the internal constraints of the gospel of 
Christ. The unrestrained freedom of unregenerated human na- 
ture inevitably menaces the world. The extraordinary world 
situation which we have created with our guns lays upon us the 
most serious responsibility to send the gospel into all nations. 

The Convention at Atlanta in May recognized the new obliga- 
tions which this extraordinary world situation laid upon South- 
ern Baptists and authorized the Board to undertake reconstruc- 
tion work in Europe, to hasten with the gospel into disturbed 
and endangered Russia, and to set up the banner of Christ in 
Persia, Syria and in Galilee, from whence the blessings or 
Christ's life and death have flowed down through centuries to 
us, and to which we are under peculiar obligations. In the new 
work thus designated for the Foreign Mission Board its task 
and its needs have been wellnigh doubled. Let churches and 
individual givers lay to heart these facts in making future con- 
tributions to this work. 

It is fitting to say that as poorly as we have supported this 
great world enterprise, the blessings of heaven have been upon 
it. Some of the results of the work last year were 5,6 35 con- 
verts baptized, 41 churches organized, two churches assuming 
self-support, 61,588 patients treated, and 129,298 treatments ad- 
minstered. 

The world fields are ripe unto the harvest, but much of the 
bending grain will be lost if we do not quickly thrust in the 
sickle. The world has never seen the universal human mind so 
expectant, so ready to make great decisions, and therefore such 
need for quick and decisive action by those who would turn 
that mind to the right things and lead the world by the highway 
of the cross back to God. Foreign Mission duty was never so im- 
perious a& just now. 

The Foreign Mission Board furnishes for free distribution the 
best tracts and can fill orders for the best books on Foreign Mis- 
sions. We would, therefore, recommend to our people that they 
cultivate an acquaintance with the Literature Department of the 
Board and seek to promote among our church membership a bet- 
ter knowledge of the work. 

While the '75 Million Campaign has been presented to the 
body in another report your committee on Missions would add 
its endorsement of this movement and its admonition to the 
churches of the Association that there be no failure to give this 
campaign the most unqualified, fathful and enthusiastic sup- 
port. The success of the campaign will help everything that we 
are doing and its failure would hurt everything. We have set 
for ourselves a task worthy of a great people and sha.U prove 
ourselves worthy of our inTaeritance if we accomplish it. The 



22 



THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



eyes of our Lord and of the world are upon us and we must 
succeed in this great thing to which we have laid our hands. 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

The Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, 
with headquarters in Atlanta, Ga., with mission work intrusted 
to it, cultivates the field south of the Mason and Dixon line, 
also Mexico, Cuba, and the Panama Canal Zone. 

In the co-operation with States is our best hope of building 
a unified denominational life. 

In the department of Church Extension is the only hope of 
many a struggling church to house itself and meet adequately 
the demands of its own life. 

In Department of Mountain Schools lies one of our finest ex- 
amples of Christian Education. 

The work among foreigners, Indians, and others is truly a 
ministry to the needy, but also a most wise and Christian meas- 
ure of self-defence, for as go the workers and humbler strata of 
a democraccy, so will its full body go if it remains a democracy. 

In the work in Panama and Cuba we have the opportunity to 
lay our hands on the key to the Mediterranean of the future 
and plant the saving gospel in a saved people that shall impress 
the tides of world-life for all times to come. 

The Bible Institute at New Orleans has been launched and 
this Board charged with the duty of seeing — together with co- 
operating agencies — that it succeeds, for in that city gather 
throngs of representative sinners from the ends of the earth. 

Listen to the word "stewardship." The "Go ye" is the call 
of the hour to every open-eyed Christian, and those who have 
experienced the Christianity of Christ, for they know God 
teaches. 

The Tithe is the Lord'^. — Leviticus 27:30. 

Ye tithe: this ye ought to have done. — Matt. 23:2 3. 

Will a man rob God? wherein have we robbed Thee? In tithes 
and offering. — Mai. 3:7-8. 

Bring the whole tithe and prove me, saith Jehovah if I will 
not pour you out a blessing. — Mai. 3:10. 

One thing thou lackest: Go, sell and give and thou shall 
have. — Mark 10:21. 

Give and it shall be given unto you, good measure, pressed 
down, shaken together, running over. — Luke 6:38. 

With what measure you mete, it shall be measured to you 
again. 

In the call for the support of missions, God does not ask for 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



23 



that which belongs to us, but demands the tenth which belongs 
to Him, and it is well for us to read and learn. — Mai. 3:7-8. 

Let our souls be aflame with the opportunity of supporting 
the Home Mission Board, for the Lord and Master is knocking- 
at your door, naked, cold, hungry, sore-foot, shelterless. What 
shall your answer be? 

WOMEN'S WORK. 

For past few months since the call has been stronger than 
ever from all fields, "Come over into Miacedonia and help us," 
the West Chowan Missionary Societies have done greater things 
for the Master. 

Throughout the Association each kind of missionary organiza- 
tion has grown in membership as well as financially. Nine new 
societies were organized, two Sunbeams and one Royal Ambas- 
sador. There was an increase in the subscriptions to Home 
and Foreign Fields and Biblical Recorder. A greater number 
of societies observed the Week of Prayer, reported more regu- 
larly and did more personal service work. The Association sup- 
ports Mies Pearle Johnson, a missionary, in China. Each coun- 
ty in the Association has its county union, which meets quarter- 
ly, holding all-day meetings, and in this way keep' the work con- 
stantly before the societies. Northampton County Union is send- 
ing a girl to the Louisville Training School, and Hertford 
County Union has means on hand for same purpose. The finan- 
cial aim was reached, giving $8,190.17 to all objects. 

The presidents of the missionary societies as a whole have 
deemed it a privilege to become local church directors for the 
75 Million Campaign and have in most churches organized the 
teams and are doing great work and are thankful that the work 
and task is shared by them, believing it is bringing them to a 
more systematic giving, increased membership, more tithers and 
a greater consecration to the mission cause. 

A. MILLER, For Committee. 

The Association adjourned for dinner. Prayer by D. Cale. 
Wednesday — Afternoon Session 

The Association reconvened at 2 o'clock and was led in 
prayer by F. B. Raymond. 

At this point, J. H. Mathews explained the general plan 
for carrying out our part of the 75 Million Dollar Cam- 
paign. 

James Long offered the following resolution, which was 
unanimously adopted: 



24 



THIRTY-SEVENTH A.NNUAL SESSION 



Resolved, That we, the messengers of the West Chowan Asso- 
ciation, do tender our most hearty thanks to the Seaboard Bap- 
tist Church, its pastor, and the community for the cordial and 
lavish hospitality we have enjoyed while in their midst. 

TREASURER'S REPORT. 

Nov. 30, 1918, to balance due West Chowan Association . $ 2.7S 
Nov. 30, 1918, to amt. rec'd from Finance Committee. . . 139.55 



Total $142.33 



March 8, 1919, by amount paid N. W. Britton for services 



March 8, 1919, by amount paid N. W. Britton for postage 4.10 
March 8, 1919, by amount paid Mutual Publishing Com- 



Oct. 30, 1919, Balance due West Chowan Association. . .$ 13.23 

Program Committee — C. W. Scarborough, R. B. Line- 
berry, James Long, F. T. Collins. 

After a very harmonious and successful session, the Asso- 
ciation adjourned, with prayer by L. Johnson. 



Credits. 



as clerk 



$ 35.00 



pany printing minutes 
Total 



90.00 
$129.10 



C. H. JENKINS, Moderator. 



N. W. BRITTON, Clerk. 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 2 5 
Chrijtian Education. 

1918. 

Dec. 16, Received from Capehart $ 5.00 

Dec. 16, Received from Aulander 50.00 

1919. 

Jan. 15, Received from Winton 2 8.0U 

Feb. 22, Received from Conaritsa 22.00 

April 24, Received from Kelford 25.00 

June 3, Received from Greene's Cross Roads 15.00 

August 1, Received from Colerain 59.71 

Oct. 21, Received from Harrellsville 32.00 

Oct. 22, Received from Conaritsa 2 8.00 

Oct. 23, Received from Winton 45.75 

Oct. 2 4, Received from Christian Harbor 34.93 

Oct. 24, Received from Bethlehem 26.00 



Total $371.39 

Credits. 

1918. 

Dec. 24, Paid W. A. McGlohan, Treasurer $ 36.67. 

Dec. 2 4, Paid Walters Durham, Treasurer . .v 18.33 

1919. 

.Jan. 18, Paid W. A. McGlohan, Treasurer 2 8.00 

April 28, Paid W. A. McGlohan, Treasurer 31.34 

April 28, Paid Walters Durham, Treasurer 15.66 

Oct. 28, Paid W. A. McGlohan, Treasurer 17 6.18 

Oct. 2 8, Paid Walters Durham, Treasurer 65.21 



Total $371.39 

Respectfully submitted. 



W. A. THOMAS. 



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CHURCHES AND CONSTITUTIONS. 



Churches 



Location and Date of Constitution. 



Ahoskie 

.inlander 

Ashley's Grove 

Askewville 

Bethlehem 

Bethany 

Brantley's Grove 

Biickhorn 

Bethel 

Capehart's 

Cashie 

Center Grove 

Chowan 

Christian Harbor 

Coleraine 

Connaritsa 

Creeksville 

Conway 

Elam 

Barley's Grove 

Galatia 

Green Cross Roads. 

Harrellsville 

Hebron 

Hillside 

Holly Grove 

Holly Springs 

Horton's 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

Lawrence's 

Lendston 

Margarettsville 

Mars Hills 

Meherrin 

Mount Carmel 

Mount Tabor 

Murfreesboro 

Menola 

Merry Hill 

Oak Grove 

Pine Forest 

Potecasi 

Pleaasnt Grove 

Powellsville 

Republican 

Rich Square 

Roanoke 

Robert's Chapel 

Ross's 

Riverside 

Sandy Run 

Seaboard 

Siloam 

Severn 

St. John's 

Union 

Winton 

Woodland 



Hertford County 1804 

Bertie County 1886 

Northampton County 1910 

Bertie County 191 

Hertford County 183 

Bertie County 1881 

Hertford County 1877 

Hertford County 183 

Northampton County ,_]917 

Bertie County 1824 

Bertie County 1770 

Bertie County 1897 

Hertford County 1895 

Hertford County 1881 

Bertie County 1780 

Bertie County 1789 

Northampton County 11 

Northampton County 190o 

Northampton County . 1844 

Hertford County 1917 

Northampton County . 1859 

Bertie County 1874 

tiertford County 1875 

Northampton County 1856 

Bertie County 1885 

Bertie County 1_1804 

Hertford County 1907 

Hertford County __1915 

Northampton County 1882 

Bertie County 1898 

Northampton County 1900 

Bertie County 1874 

Bertie County 1883 

Northampton County 1880 

Bertie County 1 1854 

Hertford County 1729 

Northampton County 1820 

Hertford County 1839 

Hertford County 1843 

Hertford County 1908 

Pertie County 1910 

Hertford County 1894 

Northampton County 1888 

Northampton County 1808 

Hertford County _J 1837 

Bertie County ^ 1911 

Bertie County 1803 

Northampton County _ 1854 

Northam]^ton County 1885 

Northampton County 1848 

Bertie County 1804 

Bertie County 1913 

Bertie County , 1750 

Northampton County 1889 

Bertie County 1885 

Northampton Countv 1896 

Hertford County 1883 

Hertford County 1885 

Hertford County 1873 

Northampton County 1902 



'/ 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

West Chowan Baptist Association 

HELD WITH 

MT. TABOR BAPTIST CHURCH ^ 

HERTFORD COUNTY 
OCTOBER 26 and 27, 1920 



The next session to be held with KeWord Church, Bertie County, 
beginning on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October, 1921. 
To preach the sermon, E. N. Gardner; R. E. Ingram, alternate. 



RALEIGH 

Mutual Publishing Company, Printers 
1920 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS. 

'd. Cale 

S. B. Barnes 

-T.T. Speight ' 

J. F. cale "^f- 

X, -D T- 1, Roxobel, N. G. 

a. B. Lineberrv i , 

rn T -D Coleraine, N. C. 

T. L. Brown t • ^ 

Tj, , Lewiston, N. C. 

F. B. Raymond ^ 

J. W. Downey a 

w T> n • T,; Severn, N. 0. 

W. R. Haight Windsor N C 

W. H. Hollowell Tr ^T ^' .V 

Tj t:, T Kelford, N. C. 

R. E. Ingram txt- ^ 

^ Winton, N. C. 

Alexander Miller , i 

^ Jackson. N. O. 

Wames Lonir a i . 

F. T. Collins 

B. T.White Ahosfe. N C. 

C. W. Scarborongh rT,'- . 

T. Crutchfleld ^ ^ 

P f^'^r r N. C. 

^""i ®^ ^^'^"^ Woodland N. C. 

f Rich Square, N. C. 

J;- I'- D^'l'^y Powellsville, N. U 

Geo^ ULeggett Windsor N. C. 

f • ..Oomo,N. O. 

J. H. Barnes Merry Hill, N. C. 

J. P. Bennett Murfreesboro, N. C. 

S. F. Bristow „ '. 

T tiT mi.-^, Emporia, Va. 

! •'• ^^'«ey Murfreesboro. N, C. 

OFFICERS. 

jC. H. Jenkins, Moderator Aulander, N V. 

P. M. Fleetwood, Vice-Moderator Jacljson N C 

;-N. W. Britton. Clerk Winton! N.' C. 

W. A. Thomas, Treasurer Cofleld, N C 

fJames Long, Historian Aulander. N. C. 



4 



THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 



CONSTITUTION. 



Name. 

Article 1. This body shall be known as the North Carolina 
West Chowan Baptist Association. 

Membership. 

Art. 2. It shall be composed of messengers elected by the 
churches connected with this body, and all ordained ministers 
who are members or pastors of said churches, together with the 
officers of this Association, and chairmen of all standing com- 
mittees. Each church of one hundded members and under shall 
be entitled to two messengers, and for each additional one hun- 
dred members, an additional messenger: Provided, that no 
church shall have more than four messengers. 

Objects. 

Art. 3. The objects shall be to devise and recommend meas- 
user for increasing the harmony, the intelligence, and the spirit- 
ual power of the churches, and for developing and directingi 
their energies, their resources and their gifts, in advancing] the 
Redeemer's Kingdom in the earth. 

Powers and! Prerogatives. 

Art. 4. The Association shall have no power to infringe upon, 
the sovereignty or rights of the churches. It is neither an ecclesi- 
astical nor legislative council, nor court of appeal. It may advise 
the churches and recommend measures of usefulness for their 
adoption, but can not bind them in any way. Yet, in view of the 
combined wisdom, piety and inteligence of the body, it may 
justly claim for itself, for its objects and for its recommenda- 
tioh the very highest consideration and regard. 

Art. 5. The Association may dissolve connection with any 
church that becomes heterodox in doctrine, or disorderly in 
practice, or that fails to represent itself either by messenger or in 
letter, more than two successive sessions, without suffi,cient rea- 
sons, or that treats with contempt its objects and requirements, 
or upon application of a church for dismission. 

Rights of Churches. 

Art. 6. Each individual church shall hold and exercise all 
the functions of an independent church of Jesus Christ. As con- 
stituent members of this Association, the churches shall have 
right to advise, when desired, inl case of difficulty, and to sug- 
gest plans of usefulness to be adopted. It shal be the undis- 
puted privilege of any church to withdraw its membership from 
this Association whenever it shall so electt. 



PROCEEDINGS. 



October 26, 1920. 

The West Chowan Association met this day in its thirty- 
eighth annual session, with the Mount Tabor Baptist Church, 
Hertford County. 

R. B. Lineberry conducted devotional exercises, after 
which the Association was called to order for business by 
the Moderator, C. H. Jenkins. 

The delegates were enrolled, as follows : 

LliiT OF DELEGATES. 

Ahoskie— C. G. Powell, C. C. Hoggard, W. L. Curtis, 
Aulander — C. W. Mitcliell, W. J. Dunning, Alvah Burden. 
Asheley's Grove — J. K. Vann, L. F. Liverman. 
Askewville— G. C. White, J. G. Mitchell. 
Bethlehem— W. A. Perry, W. A. Thomas. 
Bethany— W. F. Daniel, W. J.Perry, L. F. Castellow. 
Brantley's Grove — D. E. Minton, M. V. Wilson, J. W. Simon. 
Buckhorn — S. P. Winborne, G. C. Picot, J. H. Barnes. 
Bethel — V. I. Bass, Eddie Edwards. 

Capehart's— John T. White, Henry R. Smith, A. J. Carter. 
Cashie— J. H. Mathews, E. L. Gatling, J. H. Dempsey, W. T. Tacl- 
lock. 

Center Grove — J. D. Jenkins, L. J. Godwin. 
- Christian Harbor — I. M. Taylor, J. L. Blythe, Charlie Baker. 

Coleraine — G. T. Pearce, A. A. Pearce, L. O. Wynns, C. B. Mor- 
ris. 

Connaritsa — Cleveland Mitchell, J. G. Hall, Josiah Earley. 
Creeksville — Nezzie Davis, H. B. Mohom, J. D. Lanier, 
Conway — J. F. Martin, J. T. Brittle, Bennie Hedspeth. 
Elam — J. L, Taylor, R. I. Kee, C. H. Hart. 
" Farley's— M. A. Johnson, A. R. Benthall. 
Galatia— W. J. Blythe, E. C. Davis, Kinchen Taylor. J. E.Barnes. 
Greens Cross Roads— David R. Mizell, J. .A. White, G. W. Castel- 
low. . 

Harrellsville — H. O. Boulter, E. B. Holloman. 
Hebron— C. T. Futrell, Paul Beale, A. T. Yick. 
Hillside- 
Holly Grove — W. L. Meyers, Adrian Holloman. 
.Holly Springs— W. D. McGlohn, P. W. Perry. 
Horton's — H. W. Green, A. K. Phelps, Zeb Green. 



8 THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

Jackson — A. C. Gay, Geo. H. Tyler. 

Kelford — Julian Acree, J. E. Overton, E. C. Williams. 

Lasker — Jacob Lassiter, J. H. Davis. 

Lawrence's — J. W. Longdale, T. R. Oder, W. L. Thompson. 

Lewiston — Dr. Wayland Mitchell, R. H. Minton, W. J. Barnes. 

Margarettsville— J. G. Gay, J. G. Stancell, C. M, Stancell.. 

Mars Hill— J. T. Harrell, G. H. Powell, D. W. Miller, C. L. Pearce. 

Meherrin — N. S. Joyner, C. C. Parker, Cola Davis, L. B. Jenkins.--* 

Mount Carmel — A. B. Cowan, T. J. Stephenson, J. C. Stephenson.. > 

Mount Tabor— E. Curie, J. L. Storey, E. Brett, G. M. Blow. ^ 

Murfreesboro — R. Sewell, E. B. Vaughan, C. E. Boyette. , 

Menola — J. T. Chitty, J. L. Snipes, C. A. Vinson, 

Merry Hill — R. E. Harrell, Joe White, Eugene Bowen. 

Oak Grove — H. C. Williams, E. L. Marsh, S. E. Marsh. 

Pine Forest — J. H. Camp, Paul Garner. 

Potecasi — J. R. Baugham, C. T. Cooke, F. C. Jenkins. 

Pleasant Grove — C. A. Dunning, M. L. Tayloe, Walter M, Joyner. 

Powellsville — L. H. Freeman, J. J. Alson. 

Republican — E. G. Cowan, A. V. Cobb, J. K. Butler, Henry Demp- 
sey. 

Rich Square— J. T. Bolton, J. A. Worrell. 
Roanoke— W. J. Hedspeth, W\ J. Slade. 

Robert's Chapel — J. H. Stephenson, J. C. Taylor, W. H. Stephen- 
son. 

Ross's — A. F. Castellow, J.' H. Lawrence, G. C. Castellow, J. W. 
Cowan. 

Riverside — J. E. Holder, S. A. Adams. ' 
Sandy Run— W. H. Bryant, C. 0. Tyler, C. F. Jenkins. 
Seaboard — J. T. Long, H. P. Harris, A. J. Crocker, H. P. Spencer, i 
Siloam— N. T. Leggett, B. S. Leggett. 
Severn — J. N. Maddrey, W. H. Howell, T. O. Joyner. . 
St. John's— J. N. Harrell, C. W. Howard. 
Union— J. H. Hines, J. C. Brett. 
' Winton — M. R. Herring, W. E. Lassiter. 

Woodland — Dr. C. G. Parker, A. Boyette, J. P. Griffin. 

After enrollment of delegates, the following officers were 
elected for the ensuing year: C. H. Jenkins, Moderator; 
P. M. Fleetwood, Vice-Moderator; N. W. Britton, Clerk; 
W. A. Thomas, Treasurer ; James Long, Historian. 

The Moderator recognized and welcomed the ' following 
visitors: Dr. R. T. Vann, J. S. Farmer, F. B. Hamrick, T. C. 
Britton, missionary to China, home on furlough, and S. F. 
Bristow. 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



9 



R. E. Ingram, E. N. Gardner, J. P. Bennett, and L. E. 
Dailey were welcomed as new pastors. 

The first order of business being the Biblical Recorder, 
and J. S. Parmer, the business manager of the Recorder, 
being present, was requested to present the claims of the 
Recorder to the Association and what it offers to aid in more 
efficient service throughout the State, which he did in a 
forceful and satisfactory way. 

The next matter was the report on Christian Social Ser- 
vice. J. F. Cale presented the report on the Thomasville 
Baptist Orphanage, which report, together with Ministers' 
Relief, was discussed by J. F. Cale, F. B. Hamrick J S 
Farmer, and R. T. Vann. The report was adopted. 

SOCIAL SERVICE. 

Christian Social Service for us means Baptist Social Service. Un- 
der this head are grouped two departments of our denominational 
work— Orphanage and Ministers' Relief. 

I. Orphanage. 

Since its beginning in 1885 Orphanage work has been steadily 
growmg upon our people. Today it is appealing to and gripping 
us as never before. Under the blessings of God we are able to pre- 
sent to you this year in some respects the most encouraging report 
we have ever made. 

The past year has been our best year financially. The current 
fund has gone far beyond that of any previous year. The Thank 
offering last fall was the largest ever made. The Orphana-e is 
feeling in a very substantial way the impetus of the 75 Million 
Campaign. 

School work at the Orphanage was never in better shape. The 
work IS on the graded system and embraces ten grades. A busines<^ 
course has been introduced. 

The Orphanage has never made a better showing industrially 
than at present. The children-528 in all-work half of each day 
One hundred and seventy-five acres of the Orphanage farm are in 
cultivation. The boys do a large part of the farm work. The Ken- 
nedy farm last year after paying a $2,000 rental realized a profit of 
$5,000. The sewing-room uses about 40 girls. About 45 girls are 
used m the dining-room and kitchen. From 15 to 18 boys are em- 
ployed for half time in the printing office. The shoe shop does a 
good business, about 600 pairs of shoes being turned out annually 

The religious life of the Orphanage is most encouraging- its 
health record was never better. ' 



10 THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

While we have made a splendid showing for the past year, what 
of the future? Shall it hold for us a larger and brighter outlook? 
To this end we offer the following suggestions : 

1. A monthly collection for the Orphanage from each of our Sun- 
day-schools ; 

2. A club subscription to Charity and Children from each of our 
Sunday-schools ; 

3. The greatest Thank offering ever for the Orphanage on or 
about Thanksgiving from each of our churches. 

II. Ministers' Relief. 

This department of our work was organized 29 years ago. The 
work of this Board is appealing more and more strongly to the 
hearts of our people. The treasurer's report shows the greatest 
year financially in the history of the Board. The Board will par- 
ticipate in the 75 Million Campaign to the amount of $300,000. 

For several years past we have had the beautiful custom of mak- 
ing a Christmas offering to our aged ministers. Since these offer- 
ings count in the 75 Million Campaign we would commend this cus- 
tom to all of our churches and urge them to magnify the Christ- 
mas offering this year. 

John F. Cale. 

R. B Lineberry was appointed as Finance Committee to 
collect the minute fund. 

The Association adjourned for dinner. Benediction by 

R. T. Vann. 

Afternoon— First Day. 

After a short song service, the Association was called to 
order by the Moderator, and was led in prayer by D. Cale. 

The report on Christian Education was read by W. R. 
Haight. R. T. Vann addressed the Association on this sub- 
jectl and J. H. Mathews, P. S. Vann, president of Chowan 
College, and L. E. Dailey also spoke to the report. The 
report was adopted. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION. 
1. Sunday-schools. 

According to last year's report there were 66 Sunday-schools iii 
this Association, with 647 officers and teachers, and 7,480 pupils, oi 
a total enrollment of 8,127. There were 4,552 church members iri 
the Sunday-schools. There were 415 baptisms. The schools raised 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



11 



for local expenses, $2,643.86; for Missions, $2,354.76; for Orphanage, 
$4,692.49; for other objects, $1,167.59. Total, $10,858.70. 

We cannot tell what the records of this year will show, for they 
are not yet complete. How near are we to the 15,000 enrollment, 
and the $15,000 contribution that the new program of enlargement 
calls for? 

We must Lake our Sundny-school work seriously, through the re- 
ligious census, teacher training, class organization, aggressive per- 
sonal effort, and attendance by our church membership for the 
study of God's Word. 

2 Education. 

Our people seem to be really awaking to the educational advan- 
tages presented by our denominational schools and colleges, for they 
are all full, almost to overcrowding, and in some instances students 
have been turned away for lack of room. 

Our own beloved Cliowan College had the largest opening in her 
great history. The imiirovemonts made in the main building this 
summer make the building well nigh ideal in utility and attractive- 
ness ; but it needs another dormitory. 

The needs of the schools and colleges are great. All Dut one of 
our high schools are calling for mo|;e dormitory buildings ; all need 
better equipment; three need auditoriums: two need larger dining- 
rooms and kitchens : three need lighting systems : three need heat- 
ing plants; and most of them need more teachers. Five report no 
debt. The total indebtedness of the others is $57,570.00. 

Meredith requires the immediate erection of a dormitory building ; 
larger dining-room and kitchen : a library building and more teach- 
ers. 

Wake Forest should erect at once a large dormitory building; 
provide additional laboratories, more teachers and larger salaries. 

The total indebtedness of our colleges is reported as $124,411.89. 
^ We can help greatly to relieve the pressing needs of our educa- 
tional institutions by pouring in a steady stream of payments on 
the pledges made in the 75 Million Campaign. 

3. Ministerial Education. 

In the Baptist High Schools of our State last year, we had 70 
ministerial students, a gain of 15 over the previous year. There 
were 87 ministerial students at Wake Forest last year— a gain of 
15 over the preceding year. At the Louisville Seminary there were 
37 North Carolina students last year. 

The demand for an educated, trained, and Spirit-filled ministry 
is greater than ever. Let us pray the great Lord of the harvest 



32 



THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 



to thrust forth yet more laborers into the fields that are white for 
the gathering. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. R. Haight, 
Prof. Barbee, 
E. G. Stephensox, 
John E. Vann, 
J. P. Hollomat^. 

D. Cale, J. H. Mathews, and Edgar Brett were appointed 
a Committee on Place and Preacher for the next session of 
the Association, this committee later reported Kelford 
Church as the place; E. N. Gardner, to preach the sermon, 
with R. E. Ingram, alternate. 

After the assignment of homes, the Association adjourned, 
with prayer by R. E. Ingram. 

At the evening service W. R. Haight preached the asso- 
ciational sermon to a large and appreciative congregation, 
the text being taken from Acts 2 :41. 

Morning^— Second Day. 

Devotional services were conducted by J. H. Barnes, after 
which J. F. Cale, in the absence of both Moderator and Vice- 
Moderator, acted as Moderator until the Moderator arrived. 

On motion, it is ordered that the Clerk's fee for service in 
getting out the minutes be raised to $50 instead of $35, as 
heretofore. 

The next order was the report on Missions — Home, State, 
Foreign, and "Woman's Work. C. W. Scarborough presented 
the report on Home Missions, and F. B. Raymond the report 
on Foreign Missions. 

C. W. Scarborough and E. N. Gardner spoke on Home Mis- 
sions, F. B. Raymond and T. C. Britton spoke on Foreign 
Missions, and J. S. Farmer on Woman's Work. The report 
was adopted. 

HOME MISSIONS. 

America's mission to the world is predominately religious ; the 
larger part of America's true religious mission is with the Baptists, 
and with the Baptists of the South. For 75 years our Home Mis- 
sion Board has borne an honorable part in all that has been ac- 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 13 

complished for humanity, through the labors and contributions or 
Southern Baptists. Soul-saving and convert-culture, salvation and 
service, have been linked in our labors. We have inherited great 
things from our fathers ; they were seers and saints, who laid wise 
and far-reaching plans. Upon their foundation we are building a 
superstructure for the glory of God, and the salvation of humanity. 
The marvelous success of our Board for the 75 years of its history 
covers every page with glory, and will convince every unbiased 
mind that nothing less than Divine power has given thai success. 

Our Home Board Secretary in his report divides the To years into 
three periods, and shows the contributions to and the results of 
our work for each period. The periods are three : the first covers oS 
years, 1845-1903. Contributions for that period were .?:i,520,000. 
Work and workers for that period were as follows: 

Missionaries, 10,586. 

Stations, 38,793. 

Baptisms, 82,742. 

Churches organized, 3,649. 

The second period covers 10 years, 1903-1913. Contributions in 
that period were $3,584,000. Work and workers for this period 
were as follows: 

Missionaries, 10,407. 

Stations, 27,498. 

Baptisms, 187.299. 

Churches organized, 3.068. 

The third period covers 7 years, 1913-1920. Contributions for 
that period were $3,337,000. Work and workers in that period were 
as follows : 

Missionaries. 10,770. 

Stations, 25,094. 

Baptisms, 255,210. 

Churches organized, 1,347. 

Significant figures ! They show that in the last 17 years we have 
given two and one-half times as much as in the preceding 58 years. 
These figures show that the missionaries of the Home Mission Board 
baptized nearly as many converts in the last seven years as they 
have baptized in the 68 years preceding. For the eight years from 
1912 to 1919 the missionaries of the Home Board baptized one con- 
|Vert for every four persons who came into Southern Baptist 
jchurches ; and in 1919 they baptized one in every three received into 

[►ur fellowship. 
For a number of years this Board has baptized from four to six 
imes as many converts as any Home Mission Board in America, or 
he world. There are in the Southern Baptist Convention 25,303 
churches, and of these the Home Board has organized 8.064. Could 
pacts speak louder in praise of the work of any board? 



14 



THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 



Departmental Work. 

There are nine departments of the \York of our Home Mission 
Board. Suffer a brief statement as to each — 

1. Co-Operative Missions. This is the great unifying work of 
our denomination. Where the State Convention is unable, or other 
conditions are such that the State Convention can not aid sufficient- 
ly in the Kingdom-building work, the Home Board co-operates with 
the State Convention in such work as church building and denomi- 
national efficiency at pivotal points. 

2. Enlistment. By invitation of pastors or churches men from 
the Home Board workers lend themselves to the work of bringing 
into active co-operation the untrained and unenlisted members of 
churches throughout our Southern Zion. There is no more impor- 
tant work. 

3. Evangelism. Remember there are 20,000,000 unsaved people 
in the Southern Baptist Convention. This makes the most effective 
appeal to the average man. This department of our work is easily 
the greatest soul-saving agency in the world. From May, 1919, to 
May, 1920, our evangelists, not including their co-operative work, 
baptized 12,203, and there were 2,336 volunteers for the ministry 
and mission work. 

4. Mountain Schools. These schools are in destitute mountain 
districts of our Convention. They are, and have been, great power- 
houses in the Kingdom-building work. There were last year 6,152 
students in these schools and there are 157 ministerial students. 

5. Foreigners, Indians and Negroes. Against the \iovk. of this 
department it is easy for the devil to arouse our mean prejudices. 
Our Board works with the negroes in co-operation with the negro 
convention. Gratifying success has attended the work of our Board 
with these people. Baptisms of foreigners 582, of Indians 350, of 
negroes 1,769. 

6. Church Extension. In this we are far behind some other de- 
nominations, but the prospect is good for the completion of our 
$1,000,000 loan fund. In this department the need is voiced by 
3,000 homeless churches. In some extreme cases we give money to 
help struggling churches build houses : in other cases we lend the 
money on interest. Under this plan the amount of capital we have 
is steadily growing. 

7. PuWicity. Victor Masters is doing a great service in keeping 
before our people our dangers, needs, resources, and successes. This 
has been done by distributing, free of charge, more than 25,000,000 
pages of tracts, and a number of books for mission study classes. 

8. Soldiers and Seamen's Work. Demobilization has decreased 
the work among soldiers, but still 762 soldiers have been baptized 
during the year. The Board is working for seamen at Jacksonville, 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



15 



Fla., and will soon begin similar work at Norfolk and at New Or- 
leans. 

9. Cul)a and Panama. Cuba has had the most successful year 
in the history of our work there. Our 29 churches gave $9,648 to 
benevolence, $2,793 to self-support, and enrolled 3,347 in Sunday- 
school and baptized 107. Our w^ork in Panama is comparatively 
small but very important; and its chief need is at least three 
churches with as many homes for pastors and four good workers. 

It is hoped that this imperfect survey will stimulate our people 
to investigate the claims of this great work; and help them to give 
unstinted support to the work of our Home Mission Board. 

(Signed) C. W. Scaeboeough. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

For the facts and figures herein set forth, free use has been made 
of the report of our Foreign Mission Board to the Southern Baptist 
Convention last May, and of other Baptist literature. Three of 
these facts may be regarded as features of new work, achieved by 
the Board at home, and deserve special mention just here, 

1. The Fraicrnal Address. In May, 1919, the Southern Baptist 
Convention, held in Atlanta, Ga., appointed a committee to prepare 
a fraternal address, in the interest of a closer fellowship and a 
clearer understanding among Baptists of all lands. Such an ad- 
dress was prepared and printed, and during the past year 54,800 
copies of it were distributed by the Foreign Mission Board. "From 
all parts of America, including Canada, and from various countries 
of Europe, encouraging responses were received, showing that every- 
where there is close harmony among the Baptists of the world, and 
that our common faith has created and fostered bonds of brother- 
hood which make possible close and permanent fellowship and co- 
operation. The address is being printed in the various languages of 
the world, in order that all who bear our name may examine the 
truth bonds which make us one, in faith, hope and love. It is be- 
lieved that the circulation of this address will prove to be one of 
the most effective and economical pieces of mission work ever un- 
dertaken by the Southern Baptist Convention: and that it will un- 
doubtedly lead to a larger and fuller fellowship among the Baptists 
of all lands, and to a more intense missionary activity by Baptist 
people everywhere. 

2. A World Baptist AlHanee. Southern Baptists have entered an 
emphatic protest agninst all alliances which entangle us. impede our 
course and hamper our witness-bearing to the truth. We should, 
with equal positiveness, avow our readiness to enter into alliance 
with those who cherish the things which we cherish, and thus seek 
to benefit the world by a faithful propagation of the truth, and a 
harmonious and Christian service. 



16 



THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 



As an advance step toward such an achievement, our Foreign 
Mission Board requested the Corresponding Secretary, Dr. L. F. 
Love, and Dr. George W. Truett, to go to London last July, for the 
purpose of conferring with the Baptist missionary organizations of 
Europe, and other Baptist organizations doing mission work in 
Europe, with a view to drawing our Baptist brotherhood into closer 
relations touching the matter of a world-wide missionary program. 
These two breathren attended such conference, and took an active 
part in its deliberations. In so far as Southern Baptists are iden- 
tified with such program, the Religious Herald of 14th Inst, has this 
to say : "At the meeting of the Foreign Mission Board, Richmond, 
Ya., in the early part of this month, additional mission territory in 
Europe, larger in scope than the limits of the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, and inhabited by a population considerably in excess or 
that of the United States, was accepted as a part of Southern Bap- 
tist responsibility for the evangelization of that continent. The new 
3i]uropean countries which are to be occupied are, Spain, Hungary, 
Roumania, Jugo-Slavia and the Ukraine ; which, with Italy, where 
our present work will be enlarged, give to Southern Baptists practi- 
cally the whole of Southern Europe. The Board also voted to 
strengthen the work now being carried on in the Near East, to be- 
gin the distribution of Bibles in Siberia, and do other mission work 
there. It is believed that the extension of the Southern Baptist 
field in Europe will give to Southern Baptists the largest foreign 
mission work and opportunity belonging to any denomination in the 
world. 

3. Student Conventions. These were held under the auspices of 
our Foreign Mission Board, last spring, in Greenville, S. C. ; Louis- 
ville, Ky., and Fort Worth, Texas. About twenty foreign mission- 
aries, w^ho were in this country on furlough, were used to set forth 
the need of the fields, and a profound impression was made for our 
foreign work. About three thousand students were touched in these 
conventions, and the young people, both men and women, responded 
so heartily to the appeals, that it is thought that not less than five 
hundred will be ready to go to distant lands whenever our churches 
are ready to furnish the necessary money for their support. 

Some Statistics. 

Ill foreign lands we have 542 churches, one-fourth of which arc 
self-supporting, and more than one-half of which worship in bouses 
owned either by themselves, or else by the Foreign Mission Board. 
During 1919 there were 6,834 baptisms: ^he largest number ever 
reported in a single year. The total church membership is now 
57,438. These native churches contributed last year $242,460, which 
amount represents a gift of $4.22 per member. When compared 
with the per capita gifts by Southern Baptists, this is a good show- 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



17 



ing. The report of May, 1919, shows that Southern Baptists gave 
.?6.10 per member. There are 836 Sunday-schools, which have now 
an enrollment of 47,672 scholars. Comparing the number of Sun- 
j day-school scholars with the total number of church members, we 
I have 83 per cent enrolled in Sunday-schools abroad, and 70 per cent 
j enrolled in Sunday-schools in our Southern Baptist Convention ter- 
ritory. There were 554 schools of all grades last year, into which 
U^ere gathered 18,514 students. In these schools a large per cent 
of our converts are made ; and of course, from them must come the 
leaders. In the ten Theological Training Schools there were en- 
rolled 345 students. 

Our fourteen medical missionaries gave 205,098 treatments dur- 
ing the year 1919, and preached the gospel to many a patient; be- 
sides sending the message into many a home. 

Last year there was a gain of 208 in the number of native mis- 
sionaries ; and since the meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention 
last May 67 new workers have been appointed and sent forth from 
this country by the Foreign Mission Board. So that now we have 
979 native and 406 American missionaries in distant lands, 
j Your committee recommends: 

1 1. That our people subscribe for and read Home and Foreign 
Fields. 

2. That our pastors secure and distribute among their church 
Imembers timely tracts relating to our great Foreign Mission enter- 
prise. 

j 3. That earnest prayer be made by pastors and their people, 
that very many of the noble young men and women in our South- 
ern Christian schools and colleges may be called of God to the ripe 
and bountiful harvest fields of other lands. 

(Signed) Frank B. Raymond, For the Committee. 

STATE MISSIONS. 

Our State Mission work is, in some respects, similar to that of 
pur Home Mission w^ork ; that is to say, it is carried on through 
s^arious departments, and is directed by a Board of Missions, com- 
posed of 21 members, who are appointed each year by the Baptist 
State Convention. The Board has seven departments of work, as 
follows : 

1. Evangelization. This is regarded as of primary importance, 
and is emphasized in many ways. The results are gratifying. Dur- 
ng the past year, 170 missionaries were actively engaged ; who 
vere partly supported by State Missions. Last year, the Mission 
;hurches reported 1,478 conversions, and 1,012 baptisms. 

2. Church Building. Our State Mission Board co-operates with 
)ur Home Mission Board, in the erection of church buildings in im- 
)ortant and needy places. Owing to limited funds, its work is nec- 



18 



THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 



essarily handicapped. Last j^ear, not more than |3,100 was used in 
the matter of helping weak eliurches to build houses of worship. 
This is a pitiably small amount. At least $20,000 a year should be 
expended in this department. 

3. Colportage. Tliis is comparatively a new department. It is 
not growing rapidly, as yet; but if it were given the attention and 
money which it deserves, its enlarged usefulnes would be simply a 
question of time. The Board aims to employ men who will labor 
in the capacity of both missionary and colporteur. For the work 
as missionary, a salary will be paid. For the work as colporteur, 
a commission is allowed. All colporteurs are bonded. Their work 
is three-fold: (a) Selling good books, (b) Distributing free litera- 
ture, (c) Enlarging the circulation of the Biblical Recorder, This 
last (c), is considered the most important work of this department, 
for the present. The Board of Missions is endeavoring to aid the 
Recorder in securing 12,000 new subscribers. 

4. Mobile Schools. Undoubtedly, these have come to stay in our 
denominational life. They are intended as training centers in the 
work of kingdom-building. Last year the second series of Mobile 
Schools was greatly hindered by heavy rains over the State. How- 
ever, there were, in all, 48 schools, 304 teachers and 895 students. 
More than 7,000 days of intense, faithful work was done by those 

who are leaders in their churches and Associations. The cost of 
these Schools M-as only $5,219.62. 

5. Work With Negroes. Some years ago a great and good work 
was done in what were then known as the "New Era Institutes." 
The best of the white people and the best of the black people 
touched souls in the spirit of Jesus, and labored together for Him, 
For some reason the work was discontinued. It has now been re- 
newed. Under instructions from our Baptist State Convention, the 
Board of Missions is co-operating with the Lot Gary Baptist Con^ 
vention, in the support of a teacher of the preachers of Shaw Uni- 
versity, and a conductor of Institutes for the negro preachers of tht 
State. Dr. A. W. Pegues has been secured to do this work. He is 
eminently qualified for it, in heart and in training. Our white pas 
tors all over the State are urged to co-operate with Dr. Pegues ir 
his labor of love, wherever he may go. 

6. B. Y. P. U. Baptist churches are its field; practice is its 
method; the development of all is its scope; unselfishness is its 
spirit. From among its members, candidates for the ministry anc 
volunteers for mission work will number not less than 500. In th( 
study course, graduates in the Manual now number more thai 
1,000. In each of our Baptist schools and colleges, B. Y. P. U. socie 
ties number from one to five. There are five Unions in Wake For 
est and Mars Hill, respectively. The B. Y. P. U. Convention whict 
was held in Asheville June 10-12, 1919, excelled all previous Con- 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 19 

ventions in interest and attendance. More than 500 delegates and 
visitors were present. 

7. Sunday-schools. The work of Sunday-school missions means 
more Sunday-schools, more teaching, better training and more con- 
versions. The State Mission Board conducts this work through 
Secretary E. L. Middleton and committee. Associations and church- 
es are visited, new Sunday-schools are organized, training schools 
and institutes are held, thousands of letters are written, and a cam- 
paign of education, through the distribution of free tracts and other 
literature, is conducted. 

Misses White and Stephenson, teachers at Chowan Col- 
lege, favored the Association with special music, which was 
much enjoyed. 

The Association adjourned for dinner, the benediction by 
C. W. Scarborough. 

Afternoon— Second Day. 

After song service, the Association reconvened, and was 
led m prayer by W. R. Haight. 

The Moderator appointed J. F. Cale, James Long, W. R. 
Paight, and R. E. Ingram as Program Committee. 
I The following standing committees were appointed : 
I Missions— R. B. Lineberry, J. H. Mathews, J. F. Cale, 
P. M. Fleetwood, and E. N. Gardner. 

I Education— James Long, P. S. Yann, C. W. Mitchell, A. V. 
pobb, H. W. Early,- and Alexander Miller, 
i Christian Social Service— J. W. Whitlev, C. G Powell 
P. R. Harris, E. L. Gatling, R. E. Ingram, and C. C. Hoggard.' 
I J. H. Mathews, Associational Chairman in the 75 Million 
pampaign, spoke to the Association on the success of the 
^ampaign, showing that the amount asked of this Associa- 
tion was over-subscribed. 

I W. A. Thomas, Treasurer of the Association, made his 
Report, which was adopted. 

TREASURER\<! REPORT. 

Wst Chowan Association. In account with W. A. Thomas Trea-^ 

)ct. 29, ] 919— Balance on hand 13 o-j 

)ct. 29, 1919— Received from Finance Committee .*.'.' 170.60 



20 - 



THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 



Credits. 

Aiu-il 9, 192(> — Mutual Pub. Co., minutes $130.00 

April 9, 1920— N. W. Britton, services clerk -^o-OO 

April 9, 1920— N. W. Britton, postage and telegrams 5.00 

Sept. 7, 1920— Hertford Co. Herald, printing 750 programs.. 7.00 

Total $177.00 

Oct. 27, 1920 — Balance on Hand ^ ^.83 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. A. Thomas, Treasurer. 



The Historian's report was presented by the Historian and 
approved. 

REPORT OF HISTORIAN. 

Pastor F. T. Collins has given up Bethlehem, and Ahoskie has 
gone to full-time at a salary of $2,000. The Ahoskie congregation 
has erected a $7,000 parsonage and Pastor Collins is now living in 
it. Brother Collins supplies the congregation at Early's Station in 
the afternoon. 

Bro. S. F. Bristow became pastor of Lawrence's the first of the 
year at an increased salary over what they had been paying. 

Bro. T. L. Brown, who is pastor of Lewiston and Republican 
churches, reports the work hopeful, with electric lights placed in 
the Republican house of worship during the year. 

Pastor A. P. Mustian has taken Brantley's Grove in addition to 
Winton and Union. Some repairs are under way at Brantley's 
Grove. Mrs. Martha Vann died on January the third. 

Bro. S. P. Barnes has changed his field in part. He is now pas- 
tor of St. Johns, Siloam, Laskar. 

Pastor J. P. Bennett took charge of Meherrin and Hebron the 
first of February. He is to assume pastoral care of Ashley's Grove 
the last of the year. His people are erecting a commodious parson- 
age on a lot half way between Meherrin and Murfreesboro. Bro. 
Richard Outland has passed away during the year. 

Cashie has increased Pastor Haight's salary $300 during the year. 
Merry Hill, of which he is pastor, has gone to twice-a-month preach- 
ing. 

Elam has increased Bro. Alexander Miller's salary $200, Bethel 
$120. A new house of worship, modern in every appointment, was 
dedicated at Elam in July. The house cost over $9,000. 

Pastor R. E. Ingram came to Mount Tabor May the first. Mount 
Tabor pays a salary of $1,800 and parsonage. 

Bro. J. H. Barnes became pastor the first of the years of Rosses, 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



21 



Green's Cross Roads, Capeliarts, Riverside. Green's Cross Roads is 
finishing a new house ^Yitll six Sunday-school rooms. The house is 
to cost about $8,000. Capehart paid the last $1,200 on her house 
and dedicated it tlie middle of July. Riverside raised pastor's sal- 
ary from $300 to $500. The congregation is erecting a new house 
of worship with eleven Sunday-school rooms. The house will cost 
at least $11,000 and will be, perhaps, the best appinted house of 
worship in the Association. The church has the only A-1 Sunday- 
school In Bertie. 

Bro. E. Norfleet Gardner became pastor of Robert's Chapel and 
Buck Horn churches September the 26th. B. Y. P. U. organized at 
Robert's Chapel. The work is hopeful and outlook promising. 

Bro. George D. Leggett was ordained to the gospel ministry July 
the fourth; Pastors R. B. Lineberry, Dancy Cale and S. B. Barnes 
being the presbytery. Brother Leggett is pastor of Bethany Church. 
The church goes from once-a-month to half time next year. They 
have suffered the loss of Bro. Raleigh Perry, Sister Daniel. They 
are also planning a new house in the near future. 

Pastor R. B. Lineberry's salary has been increased at Harrells- 
ville and Christian Harbor. Harrellsville has installed electric 
lights. The church at Harellsville has lost heavily in the death of 
Bro. B. F. Williams, a son of Rev. B. B. Williams, at the age of 
67. He had the offices of Sunday-school superintendent, church 
treasurer, deacon. He was a fine busines man, loyal church mem- 
ber, a true and companionable friend. 

Bro. J. W. Downey is pastor of Conway, Potecasi. Creeksville, Mar- 
garettsville and Severn. All of these churches have Increased pas- 
tor's salary, notably Conway, which added $250 to pastor's salary. 
Conway and Potecasi have put in baptistries. Potecasi has bought 
a new individual communion set. Creeksville has built two Sunday- 
school rooms and covered the house with metal. Margarettsville 
has installed a new organ. Severn has put in a new light plant, 
built a spring house at a cost of $500. Brother Downey's churches 
helped him buy a Ford automobile. 

Janes Long is pastor of Aulander, Connaritsa, Oak Grove and 
Hortons. Connaritsa has made considerable improvements on her 
church plant. Aulander has $35,000 subscribed towards a new 
building and is only waiting for conditions to become normal to be- 
gin building. Connaritsa and Aulander very substantially increased 
pastor's salary. Hortons' has installed an organ. 

Pastor W. H. Holloweil has resigned Sandy Run to take effect 
with the end of the year. Kelford goes to full time with adequate 
salary. Bro. Jim Peel, of Roxobel, died October 15th at the ad- 
vanced age of 82. He was one of the best men and one of the 
strongest financial supports in Sandy Run Church. Bro. J. W. Whit- 
ley's salary at Murfreesboro has been increased one hundred per 



22 



THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 



cent. The church has bought a lot at the College Gate for a new 
house of worship and parsonage. Thej' will erect a new house of 
worship at an early date. 

Bro. L. E. Daily has accepted a call to Mars Hill, Powellsville, 
Center Grove and Bethlehem churches. He has not been on tin. 
field long but is getting this great work well in hand. 

During the year the West Chowan put through her canvass for 
the "Seventy-five Million Campaign." The churches of the Associa- 
tion subscribed $395,706.00. 

The churches in Bertie subscribed $139,934.00. The churches of 
Hertford subscribed $139,345.00. The churches of Northampton 
subscribed $116,425.00. The following churches subscribed more 
than their apportionment — Jackson, Seaboard, Severn, Rich Square, 
Woodland, Potecasi, Bethel, Margarettsville, Pine Forest, Ahoskie, 
Mount Tabor, Union, Menola, Askewville, Murfreesboro, Christian 
Harbor, St. Johns, Brantley's Grove, Holly Springs, Early's Grove, 
Cashies, Colerain, Republican, Roxobel, Kelford, Lewiston, Capo- 
harts Holly Grove, Powellsville, Lawrence's, Riverside, Hillside, 
Oak Grove (35). 

The following churches took their apportionment — Aulander, 
Green's Cross, Hortons, Harrellsville (45). 

The following churches failed to subscribe their apportionment — 
Conway, Robert's Chapel, Ashley's Grove, I^lam, Galatia, Hebron, 
Mt. Carmel, Laskar, Winton, Buckhorn, Meherrin, Bethlehem, Pleas- 
ant Grove, Mars Hill, Rosses, Connaritsa, Bethany, Center Grove, 
Merry Hill, Siloam (19). 

Bro. J. H. Matthews was leader of the campaign and did valiant 
work as leader and helper. Some of the churches report their first 
year's installment paid. Many of them are pressing the matter. 
This is a hard year for the business world, but no doubt our people 
will meet their pledges. Many of the churches sent their pastors 
to the State Convention and to the Southern Baptist Convention. 
It has been about an average year in the ingathering of souls. 

The Trustees of Chowan College have decided to keep the College 
in Murfreesboro and have expended about $20,000 in improvements. 
Prof. P. S. Vann has assumed the presidency and the college is hav- 
ing a prosperous year with about 100 boarding pupils. 

Bro. T. C. Britton, a native of the West Chowan, one of our mis- 
siojiaries to China, was present at the Association and made a 
stirring appeal in behalf of China. 

James Long, Historian. 

The following appointments were made : W, R. Haight, a 
member of the Home Mission Board ; R. B. Lineberry, a 
member of the Foreign Mission Board ; Alexander Miller, a 
member of the State Mission Board ; L. E. Dailey, a delegate 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



2:5 



to the Southern Baptist Convention; J. W. Whitley ,a dele- 
gate to the Baptist State Convention. 

After some discussion, the following resolution was unani- 
mously passed: 

Resolved, That we request and urge the representatives of Hert- 
ford, Northampton, and Bertie Counties to secure the passage of a 
law in the next session of the General Assembly prohibiting travel- 
ing carnivals from exhibiting in these counties. 

The following report was made by the Apportionment 
Committee : 

We beg to report that we do not see that we have any duties 
left since the 75 Million Campaign has been completed. We there- 
fore recommend that the report on the 75 Million Campaign be in- 
corporated in the minutes and that each church be requested to 
give not less than the apportionment asked. 

James Long,. 
E. B. Vaughan, 
J. H. Matthews, 

' R. B. LiNEBERRY, 

Committee. 

The following resolution was passed : 

Resolved, That this Association tender its thanks by a rising vote 
to Mount Tabor Church, community, and pastor for their bountiful 
and cordial hospitality during the session of 1920. 

Having closed the business of a very beneficial and harmo- 
nious session, the Association adjourned, with the benedic- 
tion by T. C. Britton. 

C. H. JENKINS, Moderator. 

N. W. BRITTON, Clerk. 



24 



THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE W. M. U. WEST CHOWAN ASSO- 
CIATION. 

The 2f)tli annual session of the W. M. U. of the West Chowan As- 
sociation was held in Ashley's Grove Baptist Church, July 28, 1920, 
Miss Una White, Superintendent, presiding. 

After the opening hymn, "The Morning Light Is Breaking," Mrs. 
P. M. Futrelle, of Woodland, conducted the devotional exercises. 
She made an earnest plea that each of us keep our lamps burning, 
and ever be on the alert. Miss Martha Sizemore led the Union in 
prayer. 

In the absence of Mrs. G. N. Martin, Miss Brown gave to us a 
very cordial welcome. The response was given by Miss Annie Sue 
Winborne, of Como. 

After singing a song our superintendent, in a very charming man- 
ner, introduced to the Union Miss Eunice McDowell, one of our 
"home folk," but for some time has been out of this Association. 
Mrs. P. S. Vann, of Chowan College, whom we are all glad to have 
in our midst, and Miss Martha Sizemore, who is a student at the 
Training School, supported by the women of the Northampton 
Union. 

In the absence of Mrs. Woodard, Mrs. F. C. Jenkins, of Potecasi, 
read her excellent paper, "Importance of Personal Service," which 
made us all feel that we better understand the work of Personal 
Service and want to li\ e more Christ-like lives. 

We counted ourselves indeed fortunate in having Miss Eunice 
McDowell, Averette College, Danville, Ya., to give us an address, 
"The Need For the Preservation of Religious Ideals in Our School^ 
and Homes." Surely the thought of each woman in our Union will 
be more of our denominational colleges than ever before, and all 
will feel prouder of Chowan College than ever. As a body of Chris- 
tian workers, we should be more loyal to this grand old institution. 

Mrs. Vann gave a few interesting remarks, explaining what our 
societies and we as individuals have gained from the 75 Million 
Campaign. 

Roll call of W. M. Societies, delegates recognized and the min- 
utes of last meeting were read and approved. 

Under the head of old business, the Superintendent gave her re- 
port showing a wonderful progress. 

She gave this question: What is our annual meeting for? Is it 
a day for joy, pleasure and rejoicing? Surely it is, but it is a day 
for work; the nature of it is one that brings a blessing, for Is it 
not a day of work for the Master? Every Christian should live a 
busy life, a life of usefulness, so in our plans today we may plan 
so that this day's work at Ashley's Grove will stand out as a great 



WESl^ CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



25 



memorial to our W. M. U. work, and mny even reach to the end of 
the earth. 

The women did their part in the campaign joyfully and entered 
into it with heart and soul. 

The past year 215 new members were enrolled, 4 new societies or- 
ganized. During the year 13 mission study classes were conducted; 
62 stewardship cards were signed. Numb'er of periodicals sub- 
scribed : Home and Foreign Fields, 854 ; Biblical Recorder, 468 ; 
Royal Service, 188. 

She begged that we continue joyfully and full of faith, every 
one, to serve the world in our day, for we can do all things through 
Christ, who strengthens us. 

The Secretary-Treasurer's report showed a great increase in giv- 
ing. The Union had raised $14,551.55, pledged $119,297.49 to the 75 
! Million. But we're behind on Miss Johnson's salary — $87.77. Show- 
ing a balance in bank, July 28, $81.73 expense fund. 

Then came the reports of county presidents. In the absence of 
Mrs. White, of Bertie, Mrs. R. B. Lineberry made report. They are 
j supporting a Bible woman in China, and have money on hand to 
I send a girl to training school. 

Mrs. C. C. Hoggard gave a splendid report of the work being 
done in Hertford County. A W. M. Society in every church, and 
j almost the entire amount to support a girl at the training school, 
and, best of all, one woman, who is unable to go to the foreign tields, 
; will send her representative, who is Miss Valerea Green. 

Mrs. E. A. Huggins, from Northampton, showing the work for 
! 1919-1920 to be the most successful financial year, the best of pro- 
! grams and largest attendance of all its history. The Union is the 
proud possessor of an adopted daughter. Miss Martha Sizemore. 
, During the past year 11 county meetings were held. Mrs. F. J. 
I Willingham, a missionary, brought a great message recently. Her 
; expenses were paid and an extra purse of $25.00 presented to her. 

The Union consists of 17 missionary societies, which raised $2,- 
1 578.21. 

I All the above reports were adopted. 

j After the appointment of committees the morning session came to 
a close with prayer by Mrs. S. J. Calvert, of Jackson. 

Afternoon Session. 

The afternoon session was called to order by singing a hymn. 
Miss Mina Holoman, of Ahoskie, led the devotional exercises of 
the hour. Her keynote — Fitting Ourselves for Service. 
The Y. W. A. Conference was conducted by Mrs. W. R. Haight, of 
I Windsor. 

' Roll call of Y. W. A.'s. 

In the absence of Y. W. A. superintendent, Mrs. Haight made the 



26 



THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 



report, which was encouraging. Same was accepted. On account 
of sickness, the Y. W. A.'s of Ashley Grove Baptist Church could 
not give their program. 

Miss Martha Sizemore, of Louisville Training Schopl. gave a mes- 
sage from the W. M. IT. Training School. She gave us a splend'd 
description of the building, how sister-like the girls live, and the 
inspiration that is gained ; also the wonderful work that is being 
accomplished, the lessons that are taught. The work draws each 
one nearer to God, it shows us who, when and where. 

Mrs. Lineberry offered a prayer for Miss Pearl Johnson, that she 
may have strength to do her work faithfully among the heathen 
in China. 

Mrs. P. S. Vann presented a "Tree," showing to the women the 
responsibility of the W. M. U. to the work of the young people, it 
should have the mother and daughter spirit. At this time she made 
a plea for Chowan College, and told of some of the work that is to 
be done there. 

Mrs. R. B. Lineberry's paper, "How the Junior Organizations Can 
Reach the Standard of Excellence," was encouraging. In order to 
do this we must keep it before the children until they thoroughly 
know all the points. 

Mrs. Haight gave the report of the junior work. The report was 
adopted. 

Report of Committees. 

The Committee on Time and Place made the following report: 
The committee recommends that we meet with the Society of-v 
Connaritsa Baptist Church for our annual meeting the last Wednes- 
day in July, 1921. 

Mks. C. G. Powell, 
Mrs. Tucie Evans, 
Mrs. W. Mitchell. 

The report was adopted. 

Committee on Nomination made the following report : 
Superintendent — Miss Una White. 
Vice-Superintendent — Mrs. W. R. Haight. 
Secretary-Treasurer — Miss Mary Prichard. 
Junior Superintendent — Mrs. W. R. Haight. 
The report was adopted. 

Committee on Obituaries made the following report: 
During the past year death has claimed nineteen women of the 
West Chowan Association W. M. U. We are grieved to give them 
up. Some of them were among our best and most consecrated 
workers, and they will bo greatly missed. But out of our grief and 
despair a nobler note of gratitude arises for these women who had 
caught the vision of missionary service. 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



27 



Alioskie — Mesdames M. R. Newsome, J. Roy Parker and W. H. 
Miller. 

Bethlehem — Mrs. David Lowe. 

Brantley's Grove — Mrs. Ellen Brantley. 

Cashiei — Mrs. J. B. Stokes and Miss Martha Madre. 

Centre Grove — Mrs. J. S. Harrell and Mrs. C. S. Godwin. 

Holly Springs — Mrs. Foy Piland. 

Horton's — Mrs. Esther Phelp^. 

Mount Tabor — Mrs. C. B. Story. 

Roberts Chapel — Mrs. L. S. Joyner. 

Sandy Run — Mrs. W. J. W^atson. 

Winton — Mrs. Martha A. Vann. 

Ashley's Grove Y. W. A.'s — Miss Fannie Johnson. 



The report was adopted. 

The Committee on Resolutions was requested to make report at 
night service. 

The Union made a motion to request Miss McDowell to have her 
paper published in leaflet form and Union pay for expenses of same. 

We were dismissed with a prayer for guidance through 1920-1921, 
by Mrs. E. A. Huggins. 



At the evening session the congregation stood and joined heartily 
in singing an opening hymn, after which Rev. D. Cale, of Potecasi, 
conducted the devotional exercises. 

The congregation sang ''Love Lifted Me." Then Rev. T. C. Brit- 
ton, of China, delivered a most excellent address. 

The benediction was ponounced by Prof. W. H. Cale, of Lumber- 
ton, then came to a close a very helpful session of the Woman's 
Missionary Union of the West Chowan Association. 



Mrs. a. J. Harrell, 
Mrs. Lonnie Jenkins, 
Mrs. a. C. Williams. 



Evening Session. 



Miss Una White, Superintendent, 

Mrs. G. T. Underwood, Secretary-Treasurer. 



REPORT ON CHURCH STATISTICS. 



Received. 



By baptism . 
By letter .... 
By restoration 



479 
354 
41 



Total 



874 



28 THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

Loss. 

By letter 372 

By exclusion 1J>4 

By death 104 

Total 610 

Gain 264 

Total membership 13.104 

Expenses for Home Purposes. 

Pastors' salaries $85,124.80 

Buildings and repairs 15,405.18 

Poor 2,077.64 

Incidentals 7,608.76 

Sunday-schools 3,371.58 

Minute fund 160.80 



Total $63,748.26 

Con,tribuUGns. 

State and Associational Missions $ 4,647.20 

Home Missions 4,044.28 

Foreign Missions 4,830.32 

Sunday-school Missions 310.00 

Orphanage 11,895.36 

Christian Education 4,248.54 

Ministers' Relief 462.05 

Other Objects 7,200.88 

75 Million (Undesignated) 36,556.92. 



Total $74,195.55 



Windsor, N. C, Oct. 28, 1920. 
For six years, the Union Meeting of the West Chowan Associa- 
tion assisted Bro. N. J. Todd in High School and College in his en- 
deavor to make educational preparation for the Gospel ministry, by 
a monthly contribution of $15.00, for the nine months of each 
school year, for a period of five years; and $25.00 per month for a 
period of one year, closing with the session of 1919-1920 at Wake 
Forest, Brother Todd's second year at college. In view of the fact 
that Brother Todd (though still in college) has become self-sup- 
porting through having a pastorate and summer evangelistic work, 
the Union Meeting has turned its support to two other young breth- 
ren in preparation for the ministry, namely: D. S. Dempsey, of 
Green's Cross Church; and Charles E. Parker, of Kelford Church; 
the former being at Wake Forest College, and the latter at Buie's 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



29 



Creek Academy. The amount contributed is $15.00 per month for 
each. Respectfully submitted, 

WiLLARD R. Haight, Committee. 

REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK. 

At the close of a year of varied experiences, both of sorrow and 
of joy, I feel that our Union has special cause for gratitude and 
rejoicing. In every departmeiit and every phase of our work there 
has been most gratifying development. Our growth in actual fig- 
ures and statistics has been very encouraging, but far more so has 
been the unfailing devotion to every part of our work which has 
been manifested by the women of our Association and State. Just 
a year ago we were in the midst of the 75 Million Campaign. Most 
gladly did we enter into the task of organizing, enlisting, informing 
and leading the women of our State to prayer. The results of this 
\ campaign have been made manifest in many branches of our work. 
Without hesitation we undertook the securing in cash and pledges 
of the $1,100,000 apportioned the State W. M. U. The women did 
i not stop at this, however, but pledged $2,167,330 and at the close of 
. the first year had paid $98,300. The women of this Association 
pledged $119,297.49 and paid $14,551.55 the first year. The 75 Mil- 
lion Campaign helped the women to get a clearer vision of the great 
j missionary activity that lies before us. We recognize as never be- 
) fore the need of a more vital Christianity in our own lives, our 
I churches and our communities. 

I During the past year 452 new societies were organized through- 
I out the State — four of these being in the West Chowan. The en- 
I listment campaign which was carried on during the year also 
I brought many additional members into the societies already organ- 
ized. Likewise did the Stewardship Campaign bring about great 
j results, 407 tithers being reported by Associational Superintendents. 
More mission study classes have been organized and the number of 
subscribers to the Recorder and our mission magazines has more 
than doubled. 

The West Chowan Asociation is supporting a missionary and 
Bible woman in China and each of the three County Unions is sup- 
j porting a girl at our Training School. 

Never before has the value of our great W. M. U. program of 
I prayer, study, training and giving been so clearly shown as during 
I the past year. Woman's Work has, I am sure, reached a stage of 
I development which demands careful and intensive cultivation. May 
our aim ever be the building up of Christian character in creating 
and strengthening Christ-like principles for faithfulness in conduct, 
I giving and service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary P. Winborne, For Commdttee. 

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! 




MINUTES 

OF THE 

THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

West Chowan Baptist Association 

HELD WITH 

KELFORD BAPTIST CHURCH 

BERTIE COUNTY 
OCTOBER 25 and 26. 1921 



The next session to be held with Elam Church, Northampton County, 
beginning on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October, 1922. 
To preach the sermon, J. W. Whitley; J. F. Cale, alternate. 



RALEIGH 
Bynum Printing Company 
1921 



I 



PROCEEDINGS 



October 25, 1921. 

The West Chowan Association met this clay in its thirty- 
ninth annual session with tlie Kelford Baptist Church, Ber- 
tie County. - 

A. P. Mustian conducted devotional exercises, after which 
the Association was called to order for business by the 
Moderator, C. H. Jenkins, who asked R. B. Lineberry to 
let as Clerk pro teni. in the absence of the Clerk. 

Delegates ^vere enrolled as follows: 

LIST OF DELEGATES. 

I Ahoskie — W. L. Curtis, D. P. Boyett, S. E. Vaughn, J. A. 
Williams. 

Aulander — W. J. Dunning, A. J. White, E. E. Ward, Chas. H. 
renkins. 

Ashley's Grove — C. R. Revell, W. H. Vann, J. K. Vann. 
Askewville — W. G. White, Jr., D. T. Newbern. 
Bethlehem — W. A. Perry, W. A. Thomas. 
Bethany — J. O. Perry, W. F. Daniel, H. L. Parker. 
Brantley's Grove — Al. Godwin, H. A. Dilday, J. R. Willoughby. 
Buckhorn — R. O. Whitley, T. E. Vann, W. T. Taylor. 
Bethel — J. E. Edwards, M. N. Cook, J. E. Daniel. 
Capehart's — W. L. Baker, G. P. Perry, W. G. White. 
Cashie — W. L. Lyon, W. T. Tadlock, J. H. Dempsey, Herbert 
V. Early. 

Center Grove — C. S. Godwin, J. D. Jenkins, Floyd Holleman. 
Christian Harbor — I. M. Taylor, F. P. Britt, J. L. Blythe. 
Colerain — C. B. Morris, G. T. Pierce, Vander Baker, Polk 
i'elton. 

Connaritsa — J. G. Hall, J. S. Jenkins, Josiah Early. 
Creeksville — W. S. Davis, R. B. Maddrey, C. W. Bridgers. 
Conway — R. T. White, T. R. Davis, J. E. Taylor. 
Elam — C. H. Hart, R. T. Kee, C. L. Stephenson. 
Earleys — L. R. Liverman, J. D. Early. 

Galatia — Lee Davis, D. R. Davis, W. E. Davis, Sam Hedgespeth. 

Greene's X Roads — W. T. Asbell, A. D. Cale, W. J. Mizell. 

Harrellsville — M. W. Newsome, Hunter Sharpe. 

Hebron — J. E. Griffin, H. T. Vann, E. H. Griffin. 

Holly Grove — J. T. Williams, J. J. Tayloe. 

Holly Springs— E. W. Britton, R. Hill, C. L. Scott. 



8 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 



Horton's — H. W. Greene, Walter Powell, A. K. Phelps. 
Jackson — R. W. Fleetwood, B. F. Davis. 
Kelford — J. E. Tyler, Geo. T. Parker, J. E. Clark. 
Lasker — C. S. Lassiter, J. V. Holleman, J. H. Davis. 
Lawrence — T. R. Oder, Conaughton Cobb, G. E. Williams. 
Lewiston — Dr. W. Mitchell, R. L. Lodge, J. E. Britton, W. J 
Barnes. 

Margarettsville — J. G. Stancell, J. E. Piland, J. D. Overby. 
Mars Hill — Andrew Miller, J. M. Plielps, L. P. Freeman. 
Meherrin — J. C. Chitty, J. K. Parker, W. J. Brown. 
Mount Tabor — John A. Parker, M. D. Catling, Z. D. Futrell. 
Mount Carmel — C. G. Matthews, R. C. Worrell, T. J. Stephen- 
son. 

Murfreesboro — R. Seawell, P. S. Vann, Miss Eunice McDowell 

Menola — H. G. Snipes, J. M. Eley, A. J. Vinson. 

Merry Hill — R. E. Harrell, Eugene Bowen, Joe White. 

Oak Grove — S. L. Marsh, H. C. Holleman, J. E. Saunders. 

Pine Forest — L. A. Jordan, R. L. Smith. 

Potecasi — J. R. Baugham, A. J. Harrell, S. N. Parker. 

Pleasant Grove — M. L. Tayloe, James X. Baugham, W. L 
Rawls. ! 

Powellsville — W. L. Early, J. B. Wiggins, L. H. Freeman, | 

Republican — L. T. Ward, R. S. Bazemore, J. A. Speight, S. B 
Parker. 

Rich Square — J. T. Bolton, H. D. Holleman, J. H. Worrell. 
Roanoke — D. J. Warren, L. M. Cooke. 

Roberts' Chapel — J. H. Stephenson, W. H. Stephenson, O. JJ 
Ham. 

Ross's — Joe Mitchell, W. S. Hoggard, A. F. Castellow, W. T 
Evans. 

Riverside — W. M. Williams, C. C. Hughes. 

Sandy Run — C. J. Byrd, D. G. Tynes, W. R. Smith, A. T. Liver 
man. 

Seaboard — H. R. Harris, J. R. Crocker, B. S. Stancill. 

Siloam — N. T. Leggett, C. B. Speller. 

Severn — R. E. Maddrey, W. E. Gloven, Charlie Long. 

St. John's — R. L. Edwards, C. B. Vaughan. 

Union — J. A. Copeland, R. A. Holleman, J. R. Miller. 

Winton — M. R. Herring, N. W. Britton, W. H. Lassiter. 

Woodland — C. J. Vaughan, N. B. Best, E. L. Vick. 

The folloAviiig' officers were nominated and elected: C. ni 
Jenkins, Moderator; Panl Fleetwood, Vice-Moderator; R. B' 
Lineberry, Clerk; Harry Stephenson, Assistant Clerk; W. A 
Thomas, Treasurer; J. F. Cale, Historian. 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 9 

The following' visitors were recognized and welcomed by 
the Moderator: M. L. Kesler, A. C. Hamby, J. T. Crisp, 
T. S. Crutchfield and C. W. Scarborough. 

On motion, Brotlier Scarborough was made a life mem- 
ber of this Association and Paul Fleetwood was asked to 
notify tlie Black Water Association of Virginia of what 
esteem we hold C. W. Scar4?orough in this State. 

V. E. Duncan Avas recognized as a new pastor. 

Upon notice tliat Hillside Church has disbanded, the name 
was ordered to be dropped from our roll. 

A letter was read from X. W. Britton, who was absent 
on account of sickness, and asked to retire as Clerk after 
twenty-nine years in this office. The Clerk was requested 
to write him the appreciation of this Association of his 
faithful service. 

J. S. Farmer was Avelcomed as a visitor and presented 
the claims of the Biblical Recorder. 

Rev. E. N. Grardner preached the associational sermon — 
his text being John 14:6, "I am the way." 

After announcements by Pastor Hollowell, adjourned for 
dinner. Benediction by C. W. Scarborough. 

Song and praise service — J. W. Downey reading Scripture 
and L. E. Dailey leading prayer. 

The next order of lousiness was Social Service. 

J. W. Whitley read Orphanage part of the report, Dr. 
C. G. Powell read report on Ministerial Relief, and J. W. 
Whitley read report prepared by R. E. Ingram on Hos- 
pital Work. 

REPORT OF SOCIAL SERVICE. 
Part 1. The Orphanage. 

According to the annual report, our Orphanage has had a good 
year when all things are considered. There has been no epidemic 
and no deaths. The general health has been good for which we 
are profoundly grateful. 

Since the day Moses looked up into the face of Pharaoh's 
daughter and wept thus opening her heart, the helpless children 
of the world have made their own appeal to the consciences of 
men. No man who has Christ for an elder brother can turn a 
deaf ear to the fatherless and motherless little ones. 



10 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 



Of recent date, the Orphanage suffered a great loss by fire in 
the burning of the Simmons Nursery. The building must be re- 
placed. It is not the purpose of the General Manager to make a 
special appeal but to try to re-erect it out of the current fund. 
However, special gifts for this purpose will be greatly appre- 
ciated. 

We call attention to the new venture of our Orphanage — the 
helping of fatherless children at home. It is proving to be a fine 
idea. The work is done in connection with the local Baptist 
Church. The church appoints a committee to look after the mat- 
ter. In most cases the church helps to bear the expense. This 
keeps the home in contact and permits the children to grow up 
in its atmosphere — an atmosphere saturated with a mother's love 
and a mother's care. So far the cost has been about one-half as 
much as it is at Thomasville. The idea is to make the home self- 
sustaining as soon as possible. 

The Charity and Children has never been better. Every news 
lover is fond of the editorials of Bro. Arch Johnson. He is not 
only a splendid editor but he makes the paper pay a profit. It 
paid the Orphanage a profit of $1,000.00 last year. 

There are three suggestions we wish to urge upon your atten- 
tion : 

1. Let every preacher and Sunday School superintendent take 
individual copies of Charity and Children. Each Sunday School 
should take enough copies to provide one for each home repre- 
sented in the school. 

2. Let each pastor and Sunday School superintendent begin 
now to lay their plans for a great thank offering for the Orphan- 
age at or near Thanksgiving. We will thus enable Brother 
Kesler to rebuild the Simmons Nursery and have some money 
to start through the cold winter months. 

3. Let each pastor and Sunday School superintendent see to it 
that each Sunday School set apart one Sunday in each month as 
Orphanage Day, on which the offering of the school will go to 
Thomasville. This has been, is, and let us hope and pray, will 
ever be the back-bone of the support of the Orphanage. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JULIUS W. WHITLEY, Chairman. 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF. 

Your committee on Ministerial Relief begs to submit the fol- 
lowing: 

We believe that the minister, who has come to his day of re- 
tirement, or who, for any reason, has become disabled, is in every 
way worthy of our sympathy, prayer, and financial support. The 
same thing is true of their widows and orphan children. These 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



11 



men and women were faithful to God and His cauze, in the midst 
of the greatest sacrifices in laying the foundation for the work 
of Christ in this State, and surely they should receive our hearty 
support in their declining years. Other Christian organizations 
are far ahead of us in this department of work and in the dis- 
charge of this Christian obligation. Even railroads and some 
other business and worldly institutions care for their old and 
faithful employees. We should not only strive to emulate other 
Christian and worldly institutions, but we should furnish these 
old heroes of our faith the support they so richly deserve. 

The Convention Board, located in Dallas, known as The Relief 
and Annuity Board, has taken over the work of the States. The 
aim of this Board, is to give aid and comfort to the disabled 
ministers, as well as to those who have grown old in the service, 
and have come to their day of need and retirement, and to their 
widows and orphan children such aid as their exigencies demand, 
and as their financial condition will allow. 

The Board has now a beneficiary list of between seven and 
eight hundred. Others are being added from month to month. 
The stipends of the beneficiaries who have been transferred to us 
from the States have, in the most part, been increased from 40 
to 6 per cent and in some instances as much as 100 per cent. 
While we have made great strides since the organization of the 
new Convention Board in giving aid and comfort to the disabled 
and retired ministers, we are just beginning to do what we should 
do. Our aim should be to persuade our people to say to the 
ministers in active service today: "Give yourself whole-heartedly 
"to work, spend yourself freely; be not afraid; we do not pay you 
just the salaries that we should, but this we do, at least, solemnly 
promise, we will stand back of you; if you fall in the work, we 
will care for you; if you die we will not permit your family to 
suffer; if you grow old in it, we will comfort your declining 
years." Just that and nothing short of it should be the attitude 
of our great denomination to its ministry, and every one of our 
young preachers should feel that the denomination has so spoken 
to him, and that he can accept its word at par. If we could say 
that so as to carry conviction to the men of the hard fields, and 
the small salary, we should put new life in them,- we should 
greatly increase their efficiency, and the denomination would be 
really the beneficiary. 

C. G. POWELL, For Committee. 



12 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 



HOSPITAL WORK. 

The Southern Baptist Convention has, during the last few- 
years, undertaken the long neglected command of Christ, namely 
to heal the sick. 

The hospital work has now passed the experimental stage, and 
w^e now have a large staff of physicians and nurses who are ad- 
ministering to thousands in need of medical aid. In this we have 
a living opportunity of Christian love and humility; not only the 
healing of physical ills but also of spiritual ills. It is only fitting 
that we, as Southern Baptists, should address ourselves to the 
task. 

Increase During the Last Convention Year. 

Three new hospitals, first, the one at Clovis, N. M.; the Jose- 
phine Hospital, Hope, Ark., and the Baptist Hospital at Little 
Rock, Ark. 

The total value of our hospital property has increased from 
$3,314,720 to $6,240,815.25 during the last convention year. 
Also, four new schools for training nurses, with 249 nurses in 
training. During the last year six of our hospitals have qualified 
as standard, and at the present ten in all have qualified out of 
the seventeen now in operation. The, work of standardizing the 
hospitals is being pressed and the work is growing in demand 
and scope. The community service is doing much to popularize 
our hospitals. No hospital can exist without nurses. We now 
have 666 in training, with a total of 127 graduated last year. 
Training a nurse is the equivalent of a four-year college course. 

We own and control at El Paso, Texas, a hospital for tuber- 
cular patients under the control of the Home Board. There are 
several new hospitals proposed in five Southern States: the hos- 
pital for this State to be located at Winston-Salem, the ground 
for which will be broken this fall. The hospital for Virginia to 
be located at Lynchburg. Lots for both plants have been secured. 

The present bed capacity of our now operating hospitals is 214. 
When the five new hospitals are completed we will have a bed 
capacity of 3,044, with a total investment of $10,000,000. 

We most heartily recommend the work and pray God's richest 
blessings to rest on those directing its activities. 

R. E. INGRAM. 

On motion to adopt, M. L. Kesler spoke to the Orphanage 
report and C. G. Powell spoke to the report on Ministerial 
Relief. Report adopted. 

At this point we were favored with special music — duet 
by Mesdames Haight and Gatling of Windsor. 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



13 



Report on Christian Education was called for. P. S. 
Yann, for the committee, offered the following report as to 
Chowan College : 

REPORT ON EDUCATION 

Chowan College has passed its seventy-third year of service 
for the Chowan section, the State, and the nation. The in- 
crease of college students over last year's enrollment is ten per 
cent. The attractiveness of the interior of the buildings has 
added greatly to the pleasure of the student-body and to all the 
friends of the college who have viewed it. 

The overhead tank is furnishing an abundant supply of water, 
from a well 19 7 feet deep. The grounds about the buildings 
and farm have been cleaned up, and the appearance is better 
than it has been, possibly, in years. The line of lights along 
the main walk add greatly to the looks of the campus, as well 
as furnish convenience and safety on dark nights. 

The standard of the college was raised last year, and is raised 
still higher this year, the aim being to meet both the demands 
of the State and of the denomination. One year of the Pre- 
paratory Department has been dropped, so that this year we 
took no students under the ninth grade; and it is the intention 
to drop that grade next year, giving only two years of prepara- 
tory work. The teachers in the college department do not teach 
the students in the preparatory department. The college and 
the academy are separate and apart when it comes to the teach- 
ing; otherwise, they all fare alike. The Science Department 
has been greatly improved. This department now occupies three 
rooms instead of one — one room for Chemistry, one for Biology, 
and a room for the other branches of this department. ' The 
Science Department is fully meeting the requirements of the 
State and denomination. 

The religious atmosphere of the college is wholesome, and a 
finer student-body cannot be found. The students are loyal and 
true and happy in their work, and the faculty is faithful to every 
duty. 

We greatly need an auditorium, with a gymnasium under- 
neath. The present auditorium should be converted into class- 
rooms, and the classrooms and old society halls on the third and 
fourth. floors in the new building should be converted into dormi- 
tories, thus giving us more room for students. 

Had it not been for the very unfortunate discussions about 
changing the standard of the college last spring and summer, 
and for the strenuous times in money matters through which 
we have passed, we would now have more students than we 
could accommodate with the present equipment. 



14 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 



We rejoice in the prosperity of Meredith College at Raleigh, 
and we hope that every move made by the trustees and admin- 
istration may be for her best interest. 

We urge our membership to patronize Wake Forest College. 
The course given there is as thorough and the work done is as 
substantial as any school in the State for young men. It is our 
own institution, and we earnestly urge all of our young men 
to attend this institution. To parents desiring the highest type 
of Christian training and influence along with scholarship, we 
urge them to patronize the following preparatory schools in 
Eastern North Carolina: Buies Creek, Delway, and Wingate. 
Our other denominational high schools are doing excellent work, 
and the training tells in the life of the boy. 

It is not only our privilege but our duty to patronize and help 
maintain our Christian institutions, which are keeping alive the 
departments of our church work and having great weight and 
influence over the democracy. , 
Respectfully submitted, 

A. V. COBB. 

H. W. EARLEY. 

PRESTON S. VANN. 

ALEXANDER MILLER. 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

My part in this report of religious education is to call atten- 
tion to our denominational schools within our own State. We 
have six academies and one college controlled by our Home Mis- 
sion Board, with Rev. A. E. Brown, D.D., West Asheville, N. C, 
who is superintendent. Brother Brown will gladly send a cata- 
logue of the nearest school to you. We also have Meredith 
College in Raleigh for women. Wake Forest College in Wake 
Forest for men. These colleges rank second to none in the 
South. Within the bounds of our Association there is Chowan 
College for women, situated at Murfreesboro. We call this our 
home school. It should be dear to the hearts of every mother 
and father in Eastern North Carolina. 

The educational system that has been builded along denomi- 
national lines is a power in the ranks of our churches. 

On one occasion I heard Dr. S. C. Mitchell, of Richmond 
College, say that the definition of education is "seeing a -thing, 
then to know how to tell it." I believe the faith that long ago 
was delivered unto the saints will be found in the hearts of the 
faculty of these educational centers to the extent that when 
our boys and girls return from these schools, taking their places 
in the world's activities, we shall generally know where to find 
them. This is why I conscientiously recommend these schools 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



15 



to the prayerful consideration of parents who contemplate giving 
their children a classic education under Christian influence. 

ALEXANDER MILLER. 

On motion to adopt, P. S. Vann spoke of the work of the 
college. J. H. Matthews, for the Board of Trustees, read 
the following : 

To the West Chowan Association: 

Under appointment and direction of the Board of Trustees of 
Chowan College, we fraternally place before the Association the 
following facts and resolutions, and ask the action of the West 
Chowan Association thereon. 

At a meeting of the Board of Trustees of Chowan College, in 
annual session, held on the 23rd day of May, 1921, the following 
preambles, recitals and resolutions were passed and action had: 

"Whereas, The Chairman of the Board of Trustees has placed 
before the Board certain letters written by Dr. R. T. Vann, Sec- 
retary of the Baptist State Board of Education, to President P. S. 
IVann and to the Chairman, stating that he had been instructed 
by the Executive Committee of the Board of Education not to for- 
ward any other funds from his office to Treasurer McGlohon for 
Chowan College until the question of Chowan's meeting certain 
conditions had been settled, viz: 

"1. That the curriculum of Chowan shall be changed and the 
institution made a Junior College, 

''2, That the people of Murfreesboro shall comply with their 
agreement to pay off the outstanding indebtedness of the College. 

"And whereas, Such action on the part of the Executive Com- 
nittee of the State Board of Education is a surprise to our Board, 
md viewed by us as appearing to be coercive in spirit, and our 
Board regretting such action on the part of said Executive Com- 
iiittee: 

"And whereas. It is the purpose and aim of this Board of 
Trustees to conduct Chowan College in full harmony with its best 
nterests and that of our other Baptist institutions, and hoping 
secure the co-operation of the State Board of Education in this 
mdeavor : 

"Be it resolved: 

^'1. That the Executive Committee of the State Board of Edu- 
lation be, and is hereby requested to withdraw its action in giving 
uch instructions, so that this Board of Trustees may feel free 
o act upon the questions involved on their merits, and in such 
vay as they may believe to be in the best interest of Chowan 
College and the Baptist cause. 



16 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 



"2. That J, H. Matthews, J. E. Vann and P. S. Vann be, and 
they are hereby appointed a committee to represent the Board of 
Trustees, and are authorized to meet with the Executive Commit- 
tee of the State Board of Education and present these resolutions 
asking a withdrawal of such action so taken by that Committee; 
and that they are further authorized to visit Raleigh and else- 
where and make full investigation of the advisability of changing 
the curriculum of Chowan College and making it a Junior Col- 
lege, and report result of their investigation with their recom- 
mendation to a future meeting of this Board to be held subject 
to the call of the Chairman. 

"3. That we continue the present curriculum of the college 
with such additions and improvements as the President and Fac- 
ulty may make, until the further action of this Board." 

The Committee named proceeded to carry out the instructions 
contained in their appointment, and met the Executive Committee 
of the Baptist State Board of Education, with the Baptist State 
Board of Education in session, in Raleigh, N. C, on the 7th day 
of July, 19 21, when it was finally decided by the Board of Edu- 
cation, that the action of the Executive Committee be rescinded 
and- that the Secretary of the Board, Dr. R. T. Vann, be directed 
to continue to send to Chowan College its part of the 75 Million 
Dollar fund on the basis of the apportionment of $300,000.00 
made to the College, until the meeting of the Baptist State Con- 
vention in November, 1921, and that the matter be referred to 
the Convention for final action. 

And this Committee made report thereof to the meeting ol 
the Board of Trustees of Chowan College at a meeting held on 
the 20th day of July, 1921, and at the same time made report tc 
said Board of Trustees of its investigation and recommendation 
concerning the advisability of changing the curriculum of Chowan 
College and making it a Junior College; and it was then by tht 
Board of Trustees of Chowan College unanimously adopted: 

"1. That the apportionment of three hundred thousand dollars 
heretofore made in distribution of the 75 Million Dollar fund tc 
Chowan College should be continued in full without condition oi 
limitation. 

"2. That the curriculum of Chowan College should not b( 
changed and the institution made a Junior College, but that iU 
curriculum and courses of study and faculty should be improved 
broadened and enlarged as rapidly as conditions and means wouU 
permit. 

"3. That J. H. Matthews, J. E. Vann and P. S. Vann be anc 
they are hereby appointed a committee to represent the Board o 
Trustees of Chowan College to lay this whole matter before th( 
West Chowan Association at its meeting to be held in Kelford 
N. C, on Tuesday, the 25th day of October, 1921, and also t( 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



17 



represent the Board of Trustees in presenting the matter to the 
feaptist State Convention to be held in Rocky Mount, N. C, at 
■its 19 21 session, and that they urge such action on the part of 
both bodies as will stabilize the affairs of Chowan College and 
permit it unhampered by adverse criticism to do its appointed 
Vork in the spirit of its Godly founders." 

We, therefore, ask leave to bring before the Association this 
vitally important matter, and ask that you make special order 
for its consideration, and take such action as you may consider 
proper and in the best interest of the Baptist cause. 

Fraternally submitted, 

J. H. MATTHEWS, 
PRESTON S. VANN. 

Committee. 

A. P. Mustian offered the following' resolution, wliieli was 
unanimously adopted : 

Whereas, Constant discussion of the question of the standard 
of Chowan College has greatly hampered and impeded its work 
■and reduced its patronage, . 

D And whereas, Chowan College is now doing the greatest work 
»in its long and useful history; Resolved: 

1. That the West Chowan Association hereby approves, en- 
'dorses and commends the conduct of Chowan College by the trus- 
tees and president and faculty of the College, and that we com- 

imend it to the public as fully equipped to prepare women for 
k life's work in any station. 

2. That the curriculum of Chowan College shall not be changed 
and the institution made a Junior College. We favor an enlarge- 
ment and broadening of both curriculum and faculty to the end 
that Chowan College will rank with the highest in useful woman- 
hood produced and in Christian spirit inculcated. 

3. That the apportionment of the three hundred thousand dol- 
lars out of the 7 5 Million Dollar fund should be continued to 
Chowan College, and we urgently ask and request the Baptist 
State Convention to continue this apportionment heretofore made 
to Chowan College, without condition or limitation. 

4. That we deeply deplore the renewed agitation of this subject 
and hope and earnestly request that the Baptist State Convention 
will end it so that Chowan College may increase in its usefulness 
and power for good. 

5. That J. H. Matthews, J. W. Whitley and W. R. Haight be 
and they are hereby appointed a commitee from this Association 
to lay these resolutions before the Baptist State Convention at 
Rocky Mount, N. C, on the 15th day of November, 19 21, and to 
urge their adoption. 



IS 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 



Miss Eunice McDowell gave us some interesting history 
of education in the State as related to Chowan College, and 
offered the following from the Chowan College Alumnae, 
which was adopted : 

The committee appointed by the Alumnae Association of 
Chowan College at their annual meeting, October 11, 19 21, to 
present the resolution passed at that meeting to the Chowan and 
West Chowan Associations, beg leave to submit the following: 

1. That, whereas the Board of Trustees were authorized by 
the Baptist Educational Board to make a Junior College of 
Chowan College; and whereas, at the request of the Alumnae 
of the College, the Board met at Ahoskie on July 20, 1921, and 
voted to let it remain a Senior College, we beg that the Associa- 
tion will sustain the action of both the Board and the Alumnae, 
on the following grounds: That there were more students from 
the Chowan and West Chowan Associations at Chowan College 
during ihe sessions of 1920 and 1921 than any other two asso- 
ciations in the State had at any other Christian College. To 
make of Chowan College a Junior College would be to transfer 
the prestige of the associations as leaders in all that pertains to 
the uplift of the Baptist cause in this State, to another section. 

2. We also ask that the Association will utter its protest 
against our Baptist schools entering the Southern Association 
of Schools and Colleges. If not yet prepared to take such a step, 
that it will ask the Convention at Rocky Mount to rescind its 
action at the Asheville Convention, and let the subject be dis- 
cussed in open session at the Convention, so that all may at least 
understand for what they are voting. 

(Signed) 

MRS. O. P. SNIPES, 
MRS. L. W. NORMAN, 
MRS. HOMER V. PARKER, 

Committee, 

Report on Education was adopted — P. S. Yann to prepare 
rest of report for minutes. 

Rev. A. C. Hamby, of the State Board of Missions, was 
given the time of tlie night session. 

Jesse Blalock appointed Finance Committee. 

Committee on Place and Preacher for Next Session — A. 
Miller, D, Cale, Dr, W. Mitchell, C, C. Hoggard, 

Assignment of homes Avas read, and adjourned with bene- 
diction by W. R, Haiglit, 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



19 



At tlie evening session, after a devotional service directed 
by Pastor Hollowell, Rev. A. C. Hamby gave us a forceful 
address on State Mission Work. 

Morning Session of Second Day 

Devotional services conducted by V. E. Duncan, who read 
a lesson from Revelation. 

On motion, J. F. Cale, Historian, is asked to write of the 
death of Rev. T. T. Speight and C. W. Mitchell and have 
same published in Minutes. 

Reports on Missions were read as follows: Introductory 
part by R. B. Lineberry ; State Missions, prepared by J. H. 
Matthews, was read by Clerk ; Home Missions read by J. F. 
Cale; Foreign Missions read by E. N. Gardner; Woman's 
Work report prepared by Paul Fleetwood and read by the 
Clerk. These reports follow: 

MISSIONS 

In our 75-Million Campaign we are approaching two desirable 
ends: merging all of our benevolence into one fund we come 
into the more perfect unity with God as we think the more of 
giving to the Lord; and second, by the united effort in the cam- 
paign we the more nearly unite all our membership in the grace 
of giving. 

The following report is submitted on the subject of missions 
in all its phases: "Go ye into all the world," in the great com- 
mission, included Jerusalem, Judea, Samaria, and to the ends 
of the earth. We have, therefore, a thus saith the Lord for all 
our missionary undertaking. Jesus also gave instructions as to 
where and how we get the power to accomplish this task assigned 
us of winning the world through missionary endeavor. We 
prayed for an open door through which we might enter with the 
Gospel, and the doors, almost as miraculously as the Philippian 
jail of old, sprang open. We asked for a worthy task in a 
75-Million-dollar program, and God let us answer our own peti- 
tion with a subscription of $92,500,000. Seemingly, lest we 
should pay this so easily as to miss the blessing attending a 
loving sacrifice, God allowed financial depression so that the 
faithful of Gideon's men might have God's power manifest in 
their conquest and victory. 

Your committee recommends that we pray more earnestly for 
the full willingness to comply with our own promise, and strive 
more zealously for the hearty and joyful payment of our vows 

I 

I 



20 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 



unto the Lord. Thus may the Lord bestow His power upon U3, 
save the world through us, and make us blessed and a blessing — ^ 
here in the dear old West Chowan, in every corner of North 
Carolina, throughout our Southland, and to the uttermost part 
of the earth. 

R. B. LINEBERRY, 

For Committee. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 

Another year has brought us more pointedly face to face with 
the vexed problems that hinder our growth, and to the solution 
of which nothing will be so efficient as the religion of the Lord 
Jesus Christ. We greatly fear that the standards of manhood 
and womanhood of high Christian character are still yielding 
to the assaults of evil. Our mighty nation, rising in the din of 
battle and wreck of nationalities and kingdoms to the supremest 
heights of Christian idealism, has in times of peace retired from 
its lofty position of power and influence, and is allowing the 
world to drift to evil ways and with less restraint. 

The citizenship of North Carolina cannot hope to escape these 
evil influences, and our manhood and womanhood become 
weakened. These problems being upon us, we should be aroused 
to grapple with them and to overcome the forces of evil and 
renew right spirits in our people and cause them to follow in 
the footsteps of the Master. 

We congratulate our State Mission Board in bringing from the 
home of a progressive Baptist citizenship in Texas, back to 
North Carolina, the Rev. Charles E. Maddry, Corresponding 
Secretary of our Baptist State Convention. Eloquent, forceful, 
tactful, devoted, consecrated, equipped, he has within a short 
time organized for a great work in his native State. He is 
classifying the work into, strong organizations. 

The State Mission Board of the North Carolina Baptist Con- 
vention is composed of twenty-one men at large selected by the 
Convention, and one for each of the sixty-six District Associa- 
tions. That gives us a very comprehensive body, and places the 
Board in direct touch with even the remotest parts of our State. 
Under this Board are near 200 pastors receiving compensation, 
in whole or in part, from the Board. The amounts contributed 
monthly to such missionary workers range from $5 per month, 
the lowest, to $150 per month, the highest. The pay roll is over 
five thousand dollars a month, near seventy thousand dollars a 
year. The more important points to which such contributions 
are made are Wake Forest, Chapel Hill, Mars Hill, Boone, 
Chowan College, Clyde, Sylva, Cullowhee, and some other school 
centers. It is a very wise policy of the State Board to lend 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



21 



assistance in having strong pastors at each educational center 
in our State. In no other way can such well-trained young men 
and women be furnished for our denominational work. It must 
not be inferred that the smaller places are being neglected. The 
remotest mountain coVe and out-of-the-way churches have been 
able to receive the gospel. We commend the Board of Missions 
in these particulars. 

In its classification of the work of State Missions the Board 
is organized into the following departments: 

Missionary — -Pastoral Assistance. 

Sunday Schools. 

Baptist Young People's Union. 

Evangelism. 

Enlistment and Conservation (Country Church Department). 

Book Department. 
~ Home and Foreign Missions. 

The Board has mapped out an enlarged program for the 
future. Among the things the Board contemplates for the near 
future are: 

A student secretary for colleges and schools. 

A field man for Sunday School work in the eastern part of 
the State. 

The securing of ten enlistment men. 

A corps of eight or ten evangelists and singers. 

One hundred thousand tithers within the next year. 

These are all worthy objects and of prime importance. They 
indicate a practical work on the part of the Board, which will 
inevitably bring powerful results. 

The Board also has in contemplation the biggest program for 
rural Sunday Schools North Carolina has ever known, and the 
raising of a worthy church building fund for the better equip- 
ment of this work in the State. 

Amid all these fine efforts and splendid accomplishments 
there comes a note of disappointment. Secretary Maddry re- 
ports that our State's quota for the year is one million two 
hundred and twenty-eight thousand dollars. That appears to 
be a splendid sum, yet not commensurate with our ability or 
our numbers. But only about one-half of this amount has been 
paid. The reports in last week's Recorder were slightly over 
five hundred and fifty-four thousand dollars. The estimate is 
that there has been remitted direct to the Thomasville Orphan- 
age some over $140,000. We must raise $500,000 by October 
31st if we meet our quota. 

In the light of these figures our duty is plain. It is an indi- 
vidual, not a collective duty. The last dollar pledged should 
be paid by the pledgee, not by others. Near half a million 
dollars tell an awful deficit and speak in deep disparagement 
of those who proclaim the voluntary principle. 



22 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 



If our work is to expand at home and abroad, not only must 
we pledge larger sums but must meet them with promptness. 
When our Baptist hosts pay pledges for spiritual life as fully 
and as promptly as they pay for physical life, then will God'^ 
Kingdom hasten to come on earth as revealed in the inspired 
word. J. H. MATTHEWS, 

For Committee. 

HOME MISSIONS 

The greatest and most successful agency of the Southern 
Baptist Convention is the Home Mission Board of Atlanta, Ga. 
The Lord of the harvest has so wonderfully and graciously 
blessed the Home Board and its work year by year as that the 
Board has been able to submit to the Convention each succeeding 
year the best report in its history. 

The past year in this particular has been no exception. While 
the Board has been materially embarrassed by the financial 
depression through which the country has passed, yet from a 
spiritual point of view God has added His blessings to the work 
as never before. The report of the Board to the Convention in 
19 21 showed a total of 77,377 additions to the membership of 
local Baptist churches of the South through the agencies of the 
Board during the preceding year. Another deeply significant 
spiritual result has been the increased number of our young 
people offering themselves for definite Christian service. The 
Board employed last year 1,6 5 6 missionaries and reported 25 8 
new churches, 524 church buildings erected or improved, and 
8 35 Sunday Schools organized. 

For the sake of convenience and the highest efficiency the 
Home Board has its work divided into departments. The suc- 
cess of our work under these several departments has been 
notably gratifying. 

1. Co-operative Missions. — This co-operative work is carried 
on with all the States except South Carolina and Georgia, the 
Home Board co-operating with State Boards in evangelizing 
destitute sections. Through this department of its work the 
Home Board last year aided 1,3 84 missionaries, who preached 
at 7,983 churches and stations, baptized 25,532 converts, re- 
ceived into local churches 50,307 members, organized 252 
churches, built or improved 49 6 houses of worship; all at a 
total cost of $239,930.41. 

2. Enlistment. — In this department of our work we are trying 
to carry out that most neglected part of the great commission, 
"Teaching them to observe all things, whatsoever I have com- 
manded you." Convert culture and the development of our 
forces and -resources condition our growth at home and abroad. 
Last year our enlistment program was enlarged more than 100 
per cent. 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



23 



3. Evangelism. — Our Home Mission Board is the greatest 
single evangelistic agency in the world. From all sections of 
the South increasing demands for service are being made upon 
this department of our work. Last year the Board employed 
41 evangelists and reported 15,867 baptisms, 22,869 additions 
to our churches and 4,087 volunteers for definite Christian 
service. 

4. Mountain Schools. — The Home Board gives aid to 3 7 
schools located in the mountains of our Southland. These 
schools employed last year 229 teachers and enrolled 6,183 
pupils, 173 of whom were ministerial students. 

5. Work Among Foreigners, Indians and Xegroes. — Among 
foreigners in our midst the Home Board has at work a total 
force of 81 — 3 3 missionary pastors, 31 teachers and 17 other 
workers. These last year organized one church, built one 
church house, and baptized 285 converts. 

The Board reports among the Indians 11 workers, 2 6 churches, 
and 231 baptisms. 

From its organization the Board has had work among the 
negroes. Since inter-racial troubles will find their best solu- 
tion in the Gospel of Jesus Christ we should take deeper reli- 
gious interest in and lend stronger financial assistance to our 
negro brethren. 

6. Cuba and Panama. — Dr. B. D. Gray writes, "Far and away 
the best work of any year in our experience has just closed in 
Cuba." We are beginning to reap where we have been sowing, 
and the future is bright for our cause in that wonderful island 
republic just across the gulf stream. 

In the Canal Zone our work is suffering for want of men 
and money. 

7. Soldiers and Seamen. — The Home Board is making diligent 
effort to successfully minister to the spiritual needs of the young 
defenders of our country who constitute our army. The Board 
reported in this department of work last year 17 workers, 2,147 
professions of faith, and 65 8 baptisms. 

8. Publicity Department. — The Board has pressed the matter 
of publicity with unflagging zeal. Both the denom'national and 
secular press have been used with gratifying results. 

9. Church Extension. — The Board sought for years to solve 
the problem of church building through gifts. After spending 
$1,144,977.39 on this problem we still have 5,200 churches 
badly in need of help. The Convention is now fully persuaded 
that a Loan Fund large enough to furnish loans at smaller 
interest and for longer time is the only solution of the church 
building problem. 

The eyes of the world today are turned toward America. 
Millions of the earth are standing on tiptoe asking for the best 



24 



THIRTY-NINTtt ANNUAL SESSION 



we have. At home and abroad we face the greatest opportunity 
in our history; upon us in consequence rests the gravest responsi- 
bility ever. We must hold the South true and loyal to our 
Lord, for "As goes the South so goes America, and as goes 
America, so goes the world." 

J. F. CALE, for Committee. 

FOREIGN MISSION REPORT 

AVest Chowan Association, Kelford, North Carolina, 
October 26, 1921 

There is no movement more indicative of the spirit of Christ 
in the believer than that which finds its expression in the Foreign 
Mission work of Christian bodies. In this is fulfilled both the 
prophecy and the command of our Lord, "Ye shall be witnesses 
unto me . . . unto the uttermost part of the world." That 
small work inaugurated in Jerusalem -and Palestine was never- 
theless great, because it was empowered by the Holy Spirit of 
God, and nineteen centuries later has swept over the world 
with such effect that 500,000,000 people now bow at the name 
of Jesus of Nazareth. 

Happily does your committee report the progress of the work 
of the Foreign Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion during the past year. New records were made in almost 
every aspect of the work: fresh hope has been kindled in the 
hearts of the soldiers on the far-flung battle line: disciples ip.-- 
the homeland approach their task with an increased confidence 
in God's willingness and desire to give unto us the heathen for 
an inheritance. In gifts for the regular work of the Board for 
the year ending May 4, 19 21, Southern Baptists contributed 
$2,501,124.22. During this period the needs of the unfed and 
starving of Europe were brought to the notice of the people, 
resulting in a general response on the part of the churches 
and the sending of $125,000 through the channels of the Foreign 
Mission Board. At the same time news of the Chinese famine, 
involving perhaps fifty millions, met^ with a generous response, 
and our Board sent $140,000 for the relief of the famine suf- 
ferers. There is reason for thanksgiving to believe that with 
this aid many were enabled to survive the winter in Europe and 
in Asia. Including these and gifts from other sources not 
counted on Campaign pledges, the total receipts passing through 
the Foreign Mission Board amounted to $2,816,635.66. To this 
amount should be also added more than $100,000 worth of 
clothing distributed in parts of Europe which are embraced in 
the new territory accepted by Southern Baptists as their share 
in world evangelization. Nor was this distribution of money or 
clothing sectarian. Jews and Mohammedans, Roman Catholics, 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



25 



Greek Catholics and evangelical Christians shared with Baptists 
wherever there was need. 

There were also sent out during the twelve months of the 
Convention year seventy-two missionaries to strengthen the 
forces on the fields, bringing the total number of those employed 
by the Foreign Mission Board to 417. (These figures do not 
include the new workers who sailed from the Pacific Coast in 
August, nor any appointed since the meeting of the Southern 
Baptist Convention in May.) From the schools and assemblies 
of young people have come cheering reports of interest and 
consecration on the part of many who are planning their lives 
for service on the foreign field. It is earnestly hoped and ex- 
pected that these will complete their training in the schools of 
this country and then offer themselves for service abroad. 

The Educational Department reports a large growth in the 
number of Mission Study Classes during the year, the number 
being 3,151, with 39,547 members, an increase of 908 classes 
and 12,230 members. More than 28,000 Mission Study books 
were sold during the year, and over 10,000,000 pages of tracts 
were distributed. The schools and churches and different socie- 
ties in the South have been kept in touch with; and information, 
which must always precede intelligent action, has been given 
for the asking. 

Already marked changes are being noted on the different 
fields. At the launching of the 7 5-Million Campaign the need 
of enlargement and expansion was felt so keenly in places like 
Rome, Rio de Janeiro, Fukuoka, Shanghai and Canton that 
retrenchment or retiring altogether from the work seemed in- 
evitable. The intensive cultivation of mission fields has been 
recognized as our first obligation; and much has been done in 
raising educational standards, improving medical facilities and 
making possible greater evangelistic opportunities on the occu- 
pied territory. From the funds received it has been possible to 
provide much needed equipment, and to build or add material 
additions to no less than 15 boys' schools, 17 girls' schools, 3 7 
mission residences, 5 hospitals and dispensaries, 4 light and 
power plants for mission compounds, 2 6 church buildings, 4 
colleges, 7 theological seminaries and Bible schools, and 4 pub- 
lishing houses. Truly these are splendid achievements! The 
Southern Baptist Convention now holds itself responsible for 
mission work in eighteen countries of the world, having re- 
cently assumed as its share vast stretches of territory in Southern 
Europe, Spain, Jugo-Slavia, Hungary and Rumania, the Ukraine, 
and that part of Southern Russia lying immediately to the east 
of the Ukraine, also having agreed to undertake work in Pales- 
tine, Syria and Siberia. As a denomination we have under- 
taken the gigantic task of giving the Gospel of Christ to people 



26 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 



of all races, numbering approximately 900,000,000 souls, or 
more than one-half the population of the world. 

We are cheered, too, by the growth manifested by the Baptist 
Christians on the fields. Last year there were 6,998 baptisms, 
the greatest number baptized in twelve months into the mem- 
bership of our foreign churches. The total membership of the 
611 churches on the fields is 59,438. It is interesting to note 
that many of these are self-governing, that is, directed by native 
pastors and officers, with a baptized, democratic constituency 
independent of the constant supervision of the missionary. One 
hundred and eighty-seven of them, or nearly one-third, are like- 
wise self-supporting. Our 9 07 mission Sunday Schools have a 
total of 41,727 pupils. Nine hundred and seventy-eight native 
workers are employed. In 632 schools we had enrolled last 
session 2 2,8 6 6 students, 28 4 of whom were studying to prepare 
themselves for the ministry. The Board also employs twenty-one 
medical missionaries and eight trained nurses, who last year 
administered 154,070 treatments. Native Christians raised dur- 
ing the last Convention year the magnificent sum of $295,694. 
This was an average of $5 for every native convert, representing 
among Argentine Christians per capita gifts of $10.19, figures 
that may put some of our Southern Baptists to shame. 

Great have been the accomplishments of the year: gigantic 
is the task yet to be done on the mission fields: many are the 
obligations resting upon us as a denomination. 

1. We must first have confidence in the Board that represents 
us. This Board has always used "conscience and economy" in 
the distribution of the sums entrusted to it. We may expect it, 
in the face of two-thirds of the Avorld lying in the grip of 
heatlienism, not to waste a dollar entrusted to its expenditure. 

2. There rests upon every Baptist, man or woman, boy or 
girl, the obligation of informing himself in regard to the con- 
ditions and needs existing in other lands, searching the different 
denominational periodicals for such information, and enlisting 
in Mission Study Classes with the purpose of becoming a more 
intelligent world-Christian. 

3. With stronger insistence the Foreign Mission Board is 
calling upon people of means to make provision in their wills 
for this work. What finer bequest can be made than one which 
provides for the carrying on of the Gospel work after one's 
death? Others are referred to the Annuity Bonds of the Board, 
which provide for a safe and remunerative investment of one's 
property or any part that he may be willing to dispose of in this 
cause, while he reserves for himself a suitable income. 

4. As men and women of integrity we are obliged to meet our 
obligations to the Campaign fund. During the year there has 
appeared in most of our churches a falling off in the contribu- 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



27 



tions raised. It behooves each church of the West Chowan 
Association to push vigorously the collection of these pledges 
until the full amount of its pledge is met. 

5. Finally, there is need of intercession before Almighty God 
to send into our fields more men and women. The Foreign Mis- 
sion Board has catalogued the needs of 489 missionaries to be 
sent out during the five-year period. God help us as pastors 
and as Christian workers to interpret His call to the young, that 
the harvest field may not lack for laborers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. NORFLEET GARDNER. 

WOMAN'S WORK 

I am sure that every one has heard the old couplet, "A man 
w^orks from sun to sun, but a woman's work is never done." 
And if you try to imagine the amount and different kinds of 
church work done even by the Baptist women of North Caro- 
lina since the year 1815 you will get some idea of the size of 
the subject they have given me, and you will realize, too, that 
it just had to be trimmed and narrowed down a little. 

I don't think it will be out of place to remind you of that 
small beginning of woman's work in North Carolina, when a 
few women met in the town of Fayetteville and organized the 
first Woman's Missionary Society one hundred and six years 
ago. that sixty-two years passed before the State itself was 
organized, or that the gifts for that year of 1877 amounted to 
$342.16. I am confident that this is no new story to you, but 
things slip our memory occasionally, and I recount it to you 
that you may the better appreciate how the women of our good 
Old North State have triumphed gloriously when I say that the 
figures of the gifts of 1920 begin again with the magic "three" 
but it doesn't hold quite the same decimal place. Listen, their 
gifts totaled $314,004 and they number their societies by the 
thousand ( 1,6 46 ). 

I wonder if you have ever looked at their quarterly report 
blanks. Do you really know for what they spend all of these 
dollars? You will say, certainly I do; aren't they missionary 
societies? and that means Foreign, Home, and State Missions. 
Yes, it does mean all of that, but vastly more. When you say 
they gave $86,725.85 to Foreign Missions last year, you forget 
the figures almost before I finish reading them, but if you could 
have heard (as I did) the delegates talking after their annual 
meeting in Rocky Mount about their Kathleen Mallory Hospital 
in China that is North Carolina's own, about seeing Alda Gray- 
son, the Carolinian that is to be superintendent of that hospital, 
and how high the enthusiasm ran when she asked for equipment, 
and how proud Winston-Salem hurried to give the operating 
table, that being the most expensive furnishing for which she 



28 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 



had asked — I say, when you know, read and hear about vital 
things like these, Foreign Missions seem more real, China seems 
more near, and some way the dollars are given more cheerfully. 

Again, listening to a frail small woman (chairman of the 
Personal Service Department of one of our city churches) tell 
of a visit she paid to a sick woman one cold day last winter and 
found her shivering between two filthy sheets, the last bit of fuel 
long since gone, and how it was her pleasure to supply coal and 
more bed clothing that the poor old woman, even though sick, 
might be a little more comfortable; or that another woman had 
visited the city jail and found that on Saturday of that week 
a young girl was to be released, and how this Christian woman 
talked to her of the compassion of an unknown Saviour, and 
gave the girl a complete outfit that she might be decently clothed 
to come to church next Sunday. 

It is things like these that give real meaning to .the words- 
Personal Service, and men know so little about what, in my 
judgment, is the most important part of woman's work for 
"their little old homely deeds are barefooted and they do not 
make a noise when they cross the threshold of your house." 
We know though, if we stop to think, out here in the country, 
at least, the women are continually "running across the fields 
in blue-checked gingham aprons, and with flour upon their 
hands," to answer the faintest cry for help. No one knows 
better than I how little I have touched the broad subject given 
to me, how I failed even to mention that in their platform we 
read such sentences as these: "We declare ourselves for patriot- 
ism and national prohibition, maintaining Sabbath observances, 
lifting high the moral standards of womanhood, better indus- 
trial conditions as regards women and children, public health, 
education and purity of life." These are just a very few of the 
burdens they are assuming. Nor have I told you of the work 
in my own county of Northampton, of which I have just cause 
to be proud, for they can boast of an active society in every 
church save one, have a live, interesting County Union and a 
scholarship at the Louisville Training School. I ask you to for- 
give this neglect. 

I could go on and on recounting the successes and labors of 
our women. God has signally blessed their work. 

I predict that they will never weary in well-doing but that the 
bright rays of Eternity's dawning will find them still at work. 

P. M. FLEETWOOD, 

For Committee. 

On motion to adopt, there was discussion by R. B. Line- 
berry of first part of report. In connection with State 
Missions, A. Miller oi¥ered the following" resolution : 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



29 



RESOJLUTION 

Whereas there is only one church in our Association asking- 
aid from our State Mission Board for current expenses; and 

Whereas this Association has always been one of the largest 
givers to the State Convention; and 

Whereas the building of a new Baptist Church at Murfrees- 
boro is of more than local interest, being a building that will 
be a blessing to every girl who attends Chowan College: Be it 

Resolved, That we, the West Chowan Association, ask the 
State Mission Board to aid Murfreesboro Baptist Church to the 
amount of $10,000. 

ALEXANDER MILLER. 

Discussed by J. W. Whitley, P. S. Yann, J. H. Barnes, 
A. Miller, H. Gr. Bryant, J. F. Cale, and adopted by rising- 
vote. 

E. N. Gardner spoke on Foreign Missions and T. S. 
Crutchfield on Woman's Work, and the whole report was 
adopted. 

Music by Misses Stephenson, White and Lane of Chowan 
College. 

The following committee on nominations was appointed — 
W. R. Haight, F. B. Raymond, Harry Stephenson and J. W. 
Whitley. 

Committee on Time and Place recommend Elam as place ; 
Tuesday and Wednesday after the fourth Sunday in Oc- 
tober, 1922. J. W. Whitley to preach and J. F. Cale alter- 
nate. Adopted. 

The following committee was appointed on order of busi- 
ness— J. W. Whitley, R. B. Lineberry, A. V. Cobb, W. H. 
Hollowell. 

On motion, the Clerk's salary was ordered to remain 
at $50. 

Adjourned for dinner. Benediction by R. D. Stephenson. 

Afternoon — Second Day 

Report of Nominating Committee read and adopted as 
follows: Representative Home Missions, E. N. Gardner; 
Foreign Missions, R. B. Lineberry; State Missions, H. G. 
Bryant; Delegate to Southern Baptist Convention; A. P. 
Mustian; Delegate to State Convention, W. H. Hollowell. 



30 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 



Finance Committee reported $176 collected for Minutes. 

Subject of Education was called, and Jesse Blalock spoke 
on Sunday Schools, L. E. Dailey on B. Y. P. U. and V. E. 
Duncan on both these subjects. 

The following standing committees were named by the 
Moderator : 

Missions — V. E. Duncan, H. G. Brj^ant, Alexander Miller, 
"W. H. Stephenson, J. W. Downey, J. H. Matthews. 

Christian Social Service — E. N. Grardner, J. T. Bolton, 
W. H. Hollowell, Jesse Blalock, Dr. W. Mitchell, S. B. 
Barnes. 

Christian Education : John F. Cale, F. B. Raymond, W. D. 
Barbee, P. S. Yann, H. AY. Early, L. E. Dailey. 
L. E. Dailey read the following resolution: 

Whereas the public bathing on the Sabbath day has become 
a nuisance and has lowered the morals of many of our people: 

Therefore, we, the members of the West Chowan Association 
in session at Kelford, N. C, October 26, 1921, vote our disap- 
proval of the same, and we petition our representatives to draw 
a bill and present at the special session which convenes in 
December to prohibit this nuisance on the Sabbath day within 
the bounds of our Association, embracing Bertie, Northampton 
and Hertford counties, with any other police regulations neces- 
sary to protect decent society. 

Submitted by 

L. E. DAILEY. 
J. H, BARNES. 
W. MITCHELL. 

After discussion by L. E. Dailey and J. H. Barnes, adopted 
by rising vote. 

Resolution offered by J. "W. Downey : 

Resolved, That this Association tender its thanks by a rising 
vote to Kelford Baptist Church, community, and pastor for their 
beautiful and cordial hospitality during the session of 19 21. 

J. W. DOWNEY. 

Adopted by rising vote. 
Resolution by E. N. Gardner: 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



31 



Whereas the work of the Clerk of the West Chowan Associa- 
tion may be greatly aided if the letters of the different churches 
are sent to the Clerk several days before the convening of the 
Association; and 

Whereas the Association feels the desirability of a digest of 
these reports being submitted to it: Be it, therefore, Resolved: 

1. That the churches of this Association be earnestly requested 
to close their associational books on the thirtieth day of Sep- 
tember; and 

2. That their letters be forwarded to the Clerk of the Associa- 
tion at least ten days before the convening of the body. 

E. N. GARDNER. 
Amended to ask the Clerk to secure a blackboard for the 
digest, the Association to pay for the same. 
Adopted. 

On motion, L. E. Dailey was asked to reapportion the 
amounts for ministerial students so as to take care of 
Charlie Parker at Buies Creek. 

A vote of thanks was given the ladies of Chowan College 
for their special music. 

Adjourned. 

C. H. JENKINS, Moderator. 
R. B. LTNEBERRY, Clerk. 

ANNUAL MEETING OF THE W. M. tl., AVEST CHOAVAN 
ASSOCIATION 

The 27th annual session of the W. M. U. of the West Chowan 
Association met with Connaritsa Baptist Church, July 2 7, 19 21, 
Miss Una White, Superintendent, presiding. 

After the opening hymn, "Let the Lower Lights Be Burning," 
Mrs. Herbert Jenkins, of Aulander, conducted the devotional 
exercises, reading as our Scripture lesson the 13th chapter of 
First Corinthians. She made an earnest plea that each of us 
learn to love Christ more and be ever willing workers for the 
advancement and upbuilding of His kingdom on earth. The 
Union was then led in prayer by Mrs. Jenkins, after which the 
congregation stood and sang "More Love To Thee." 

Mrs. Charlie Morriss gave the Union a very cordial welcome. 
In the absence of Mrs. Mary Liverman, the response was given 
by our Superintendent, Miss White. 

We were glad to have with us ten representatives from the 
Sandy Run R. A. Band, who contributed their bit in making our 
meeting a success by singing "If Jesus Goes With Me." We 
hope it will encourage the delegates here from other churches 
to go home and organize the R. A's in their church. 



32 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 



After this the Superintendent, in a very charming manner, 
introduced to the Union Mrs. W. N. Jones, of Raleigh, President 
of the State W. M. U.; Mrs. F. G. Battle, Vice-President of the 
Elizabeth City Division; Miss Pearl Harriss of Weldon; Miss 
Ursa Vinson of Ahoskie, who will enter the Training School this 
fall, supported by the Hertford County Union. The Union wishes 
for her much success in her Avork. A letter was read by the 
secretary from Miss Pearl Johnson, a missionary to foreign 
fields, supported by the West Chowan W. M. U. 

Roll call of W. M. Societies, delegates from thirty-four churches 
recognized. 

Under the head of business, the Superintendent gave her re- 
port, showing a wonderful progress. She especially asked that 
we strive to meet our greatest task, namely, enlistment and 
keep up with Campaign pledge. 

The past year 218 new members were enrolled, making a 
total now enrolled of 1,982. Two societies have been revived. 
This year, as never before, the societies have realized the impor- 
tance of taking the different missionary magazines. Campaigns 
have been put on in the different societies for them. As a result, 
the following number of magazines are taken: Home and Foreign 
Field, 254; Biblical Recorder, 455; Royal Service, 186. She 
also reported a greater manifestation of interest in Mission 
Study classes, due to the untiring efforts of our Mission Study 
Superintendent, Miss Bessie Tayloe. 

Prayer being the vital part of our work, 21 societies observed 
the Week of Prayer for World-Wide Missions; 2 3 for Home Mis- 
sions; 22 for State Missions. 

The following societies attained all the points on the Standard 
of Excellence: Ahoskie, Aulander, Coleraine, Lewiston and 
Severn. The other societies reported as doing fine work. 

The financial report showed a great increase in giving, yet the 
Union has not reached her proportionate part of the 75 Million. 
For the 75 Million the Union has raised $14,943.93; pledged 
$119,297.49. 

For Miss Johnson's salary the Union has raised $973.29. She 
has been paid $921.19, leaving a balance in bank, July 27, 1921, 
of $52.10. Amount paid in for Associational Expense Fund, 
$148.02. Amount paid out, $69.95, showing a balance in bank 
July 27, 1921, of $78.07. 

Then came the report of Y. W. A. Superintendent, Mrs. A. L. 
Lassiter of Potecasi. New Y. W. A's organized, 1; number of 
organizations in Association, 12. Total amount contributed to 
all objects, $987.20. 

Mrs. W. R. Haight of Windsor, Junior Superintendent, sub- 
mitted the following report: Sunbeam Bands, 36; number of 
members, 822; R. A*s, 10; number of members, 90; G. A's, 10; 
number of members, 101. Fourteen bands were reported on 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



33 



the roll of honor; 4 reported as Al Bands, viz; Ahoskie Sun- 
heams, Buckhorn Sunbeams, Severn Sunbeams, Lewiston G. A's. 

Amount given by Sunbeams, $1,271.30; R. A's, $306.71; 
G. A's, $286.86. Total amount given by Junior Bands, $1,864.87. 

Next was the report of the Mission Study Superintendent, Miss 
Bessie Tayloe, of Ahoskie. She reported a growing interest in 
Mission Study Classes. She urged that this Association strive 
to lead in Mission Study Classes, and said we must strive to 
stimulate a missionary spirit in the society and do more Per- 
sonal Service since we were saved to serve. 

Then came the report of County Presidents. Mrs. W. G. 
White reported splendid work by the Bertie Union, a greater 
increase in attendance, better programs and more interest in 
Mission Study Classes. Miss Pierce, of Coleraine, will enter the 
Training School this fall, supported by the Bertie Union. 

Mrs. C. C. Hoggard gave an interesting report of the work 
done by the Hertford County Union. This county also has a 
girl, Miss Vinson, of Ahoskie, who will enter the Training School 
this fall, supported by the County Union. 

Mrs. E. A. Huggins, from Northampton, reported a most suc- 
cessful year's work. More interest in Mission Study and more 
literature taken. They also expect to continue their scholarship 
to the Training School. 

All the above reports were adopted. 

"North Carolina's Part of Our W. M. U. Training School," 
Louisville, Kentucky, was very forcibly and interestingly dis- 
cussed by Mrs. R. L. Bolton, of Rich Square. 

The girls who expect to enter the Training School this fall, 
supported by the County Unions, were now recognized. Only 
one was present. Miss Vinson of Ahoskie. She came forward 
and expressed her heartfelt thanks to the Hertford Union for 
the scholarship, and asked the prayers of the West Chowan 
W. M. U. 

We were delighted to have Miss Claude Stephenson, head of 
the Voice Department of Chowan College, to sing for us. 

Owing to the lateness of the hour, Mrs. Jones asked that her 
address be left over for the afternoon. 

A very impressive Memorial Service was conducted by Mrs. 
C. C. Tyler, of Roxobel. After singing "Nearer My God to Thee," 
a list of the following faithful and useful women whom God in 
His infinite wisdom and mercy has seen fit to call from among 
us was read, namely: Ahoskie, Mrs. W. H. Miller and Mrs. R. R. 
Copeland. Aulander, Mrs. Will Morriss. Hebron, Mrs. Susie 
Beale. Holly Grove, Mrs. J. H. Bowen, Miss Armitta Mitchell. 
Hortons, Mrs. Julia E. Powell. Mars Hill, Mrs. K. B. Davidson. 
Mount Carmel, Mrs. J. G. Joyner. Republican, Mrs. L. T. Ward. 
Seaboard, Miss Fannie Foster. Sandy Sun, Mrs. P. C. Jenkins. 



34 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 



Rich Square, Mrs. C. Linwood Odom and Mrs. Joshua Copeland. 
After a prayer by Mrs. Tyler, "Asleep in Jesus" was sung soft 
and low. The Union again bowed in prayer, Mrs. John Peele 
leading. 

A committee on literature was appointed as follows: Mrs. G. 
E. Daniel, Mrs. R. L. Bolton and Mrs. O. P. Snipes. This com- 
mittee was asked to solicit subscriptions to the different maga- 
zines during the noon hour. 

After announcements and appointment of different committees, 
the morning session came to a close. 

Afternoon Session 

The afternoon session was called to order by Mrs. W. R. 
Haight, Vice-Superintendent. Miss Josephine Futrell conducted 
the devotional exercises, reading the 13th chapter of First Corin- 
thians. We were led in prayer by Mrs. Haight. 

Report of Secretary was read and approved. 

We counted ourselves indeed fortunate in having with us Miss 
Pearl Harriss, of Weldon, formerly a daughter of the West 
Chowan, who gave us a very interesting and impressive paper 
on the "Importance of Paying Our Campaign Pledges." 

We were indeed glad to have with us Mrs. W. N. Jones, Presi- 
dent of the State W. M. U., who then addressed the Union. She 
stressed the importance of the societies having Mission Study 
Classes and asked that every society in the Association strive 
to be an A-1 society by reaching every point on the Standard 
of Excellence. 

"Training :\Iore Important Than Contribution" was very en- 
thusiastically and vividly shown by Mrs. C. C. Hoggard, of 
Ahoskie. 

Mrs. E. A. Huggins led the Union in special prayer for rain, 
praying God to send showers of blessings that the crops may be 
refreshed. 

We were again delighted to have a solo from Miss Claude 
Stephenson. 

We were indeed glad to have with us Mr. P. S. Vann, President 
of Chowan College, who gave us a short talk, telling us of the 
splendid work Chowan College is now doing, mentally and 
spiritually. 

After this we listened to a very splendid talk by Mrs. F. G. 
Battle, of New Bern, Vice-President of the Elizabeth City Divi- 
sion, telling us the importance of making our missionary pro- 
grams interesting and instructive, saying knowledge is the key 
to interest, and let's press forward that we may not be found 
wanting. 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



35 



Report of Committees 

The Committee on Time and Place made the following report: 
The committee recommends that the Union meet with the 
Society of Ahoskie Baptist Church for our next annual meeting, 
Wednesday after the fourth Sunday in July, 19 22. 

MRS. H. U. GRIFFITH. 
MRS. E. B. VAUGHAN. 
MRS. W. G. WHITE. 

The report was adopted. 

The Committee on Nomination made the following report: 
Superintendent — Miss Una White. 
Vice-Superintendent — Mrs. Arthur Miller. 
Secretary-Treasurer — Miss Mary Pritchard. 
Junior Superintendent — Mrs. W. R. Haight. 
Mission Study Superintendent — Miss Bessie Tayloe. 
Y. W. A. Superintendent — Mrs. A. L. Lassiter. 
The report was adopted. 

Following resolutions were read and adopted by the Union: 

Resolved by the Alumnae of Chowan College, That hereafter 
the Associational Meeting give thirty minutes time on the pro- 
gram to the college. 

After this we were very highly entertained by the G. A. 
workers of Cashie Baptist Church, who gave us a pageant — 
"When the Standard Convinced." 

After this we were delighted by a quartette, "Jesus Lover of 
My Soul." given by the representatives of Center Grove Church. 

We were dismissed with a prayer for God's guidance through 
1921-1922 by Mrs. Herbert Jenkins. 

Evenin?4 Session 

^Meeting was presided over by Rev. F. B. Raymond. 
Devotional exercises were conducted by Rev. T. L. Brown, of 
Lewiston. 

After this a very forcible and inspiring missionary sermon 
was preached by Rev. Charles Anderson, of Scotland Neck. 

The Committee on Resolutions read the following; 

In loving gratitude to our Heavenly Father for the privilege 
of assembling together in this annual W. M. U. meeting at 
Connaritsa Baptist Church, be it Resolved: 

1. That the inspiration received at this meeting inspires us 
to higher and nobler efforts in our missionary societies. 

2. That we extend to the Junior Organizations our gratitude 
for their part on our program. 

3. That we express to the visiting speakers our appreciation 
of their presence and the wonderful messages they brought to us. 



86 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 



4. That we extend to the pastor and members of Connaritsa 
Church, and all the good people of this community, our sincere 
thanks for their gracious hospitality. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. W. C. ASKEW. 
MRS. G. C. MITCHELL. 
MRS. JOHN E. PEELE. 
The meeting then closed with prayer. 

UNA WHITE, Superintendent. 
MARY PRITCHARD, Secretary. 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

West Chowan Association in Account with 



W. A. Thomas, Treasurer 

Oct. 2 7, 19 20. Balance on hand $ S.S3 

Oct. 2 8, 1920. Received from Finance Committee 1^)3.66 

Total $ 20 2.49 

Credits 

Jan. 20, 1921. Mutual Pub. Co., Minutes $ 155.00 

Jan. 20, 1921. N. W. Britton. services Clerk 45.00 

Jan. 20. 1921. N. W. Britton, postage 2. 48 

Total $ 202.48 

Oct. 2 6, 19 21. Balance on hand .01 

Respectfully submitted, 



W. A. THOMAS, Treasurer. 

REPORT ON CHURCH STATISTICS 
Received 



By baptism 694 

By letter 262 

By restoration 56 



Total 1,012 

Loss 

By letter 3 07 

By exclusion 105 

By death * 104 



Total 516 

Gain 496 

Membership 13,685 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION 



37 



Expenses for Home Purposes 

Pastors' salary $ 34,043.96 

Building and repairs 8,732.71 

Incidentals 5,155.31 

Sunday School expenses 4,741.84 

Poor 2,600.06 

Minute Fund , 190.58 

Other objects 6,694.59 



Total $ 62,159.05 

Contributions 

State Missions $ 1,986.94 

Home Missions 1,842.19 

Foreign Missions 2,162.11 

Orphanage 10,892.29 

Christian Education 1,522.5 4 

Ministers' Relief 295.83 

75-Million 28,416.54 



Total benevolence % 47,118.44 

Grand total 109,279.49 

Otlior Interestins> Mattel's 

Number churches 5 8 

Number churches with S. S 5 7 

Number churches with W. M. S 5 6 

Number W. M. U. societies 130 

Number branch S. S 10 

Churches Leading Membership: 

Ross' 652 

Ahoskie 536 

Coleraine 529 

Churches Leading Baptisms: 

Buckhorn 5 8 

Coleraine 44 

Lewiston 35 

Churches Leading Total Finances: 

Murfreesboro $ 7,834.94 

Ahoskie 6,420.13 

Union 6,263.69 

Churches Leading Benevolence: 

Ahoskie 1 $ 3,677.32 

Coleraine 2,844.65 

Cashie 2,293.88 



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President and Post-Office 


F. L. Howard, Ahoskie 

Craig Revell, ConAvay 


H. G. Evans, Merry Hill 

Floyd Holleman, Ahoskie 

R. C. Mason, Harrellsville 

Mrs E. E. Holleman, Askewville 

Mrs. W. H. Hollowell, Kelford 

Miss Audrey Hoggard, Uewiston 

R N. Freeman, Coleraine 

Miss Hattie Boone, Murfreesboro 

J. B. Gatling, Ahoskie 

Fred Joyner, Murfreesboro 


L^etne waiter jenKins, MurireesDoro . . . . 

C. C. Hunter, Rich Square 

J. C. Edwards, Pendleton 

S. B. Adams, Merry Hill 

Miss Madge Gilikin, Roxobel 

Gordon Maddrey, Seaboard 

Mahlon Deloatch, Severn 

Total 


Name of 
Organization 


3 Union.' 
3 Union . 
s Union . 
3 Union . 


3 Union. 
3 Union. 
3 Union. 
3 Union. 
3 Union . 
3 Union . 
s Union, 
s Union . 
s Union, 
s Union , 
s Union . 
s Union . 

s Union, 
s Union . 
s Union . 
s Union, 
s Union, 
s Union, 
s Union, 
s Union , 
s Union, 


Baptist Young- People'; 
Baptist Young People'; 
Baptist Young People': 
Baptist Young People'! 
Baptist Young People'; 
Baptist Young People'; 
Baptist Young People'; 
Baptist Young People'; 
Baptist Young People'; 
Baptist Young- People'; 
Baptist Young People'; 
Baptist Young People': 
Baptist Y'oung People'; 
Baptist Young People': 
Baptist Young People': 
Baptist Young People': 

Junior B. Y. P. U 

Baptist Young People': 
Baptist Young People'; 
Baptist Young People' 
Baptist Young People', 
Baptist Young People' 
Baptist Young People' 
Baptist Young People' 
Baptist Young People' 
Baptist Y'oung People' 


CHURCH 


Ahoskie 

Aulander 

Ashley's Grove . . . 
Bethany 


Capehart's 

Center Grove 

Colerain 

Conway 

Harrellsville. . • • . 

Holly Grove 

Kelford , 

Mars Hill 

Meherrin 

Murfreesboro. ... 


MurireesDoro 

Powellsville • • 

Rich Square 

Roberts' Chapel. . 

Riverside 

Sandy Run 

Seaboard 

Woodland 



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CHURCHES AND CONSTITUTIONS 



Location and Date of Constitution 



Ahoskie 

Aulander 

Ashley's Grove 

Askewville 

Bethlehem 

Bethany 

Brantley's Grove. . . 

Buckhorn 

Capeharfs 

Cashie 

Center Grove 

Chowan 

Christian Harbor. . 

Coleraine 

Connaritsa 

Creeksville 

Conway 

Barley's 

Elam 

Galatia • • 

Green's Cross Roacls 

Harrellsville 

Hebron 

Hillside 

Holly Grove 

Holly Springs 

Horton's 

Jackson 

Kelford 

Lasker 

La\A-rence's 

Lewiston 

;Margaretts\-ille . . . . 

Mars Hill 

^Meherriu 

Mount Carmel 

:\Iount Tabor 

INIurfreesboro 

Menola 

Merry Hill 

Oak Grove 

Pine Forest 

Potecasi 

Pleasant Grove. . . . 

Powellsville 

Republican 

Rich Square 

Roanoke 

Roberts' Chapel. . . . 

Ross' 

Riverside. 

Sandy Run 

Seaboard 

Siloam 

Severn 

St. John's 

Union 

Winton . 

Woodland 



Hertford County 1804 

Bertie County 1886 

Northampton County....." 1910 

Bertie County 1913 

Hertford County 1835 

Bertie County 1881 

Hertford County 1877 

Hertford County 1835 

Bertie County 1824 

Bertie County 1770 

Bertie County 1897 

Hertford County 1895 

Hertford County 1881 

Bertie County 1780 

Bertie County 1789 

Northampton County 1892 

Northampton County ....1905 

Hertford County 1917 

Northampton County 1844 

Northampton County , 1859 

Bertie County 1874 

Hertford County 1875 

Northampton County 1856 

Bertie County 1885 

Bertiie County 1804 

Hertford County 1907 

Hertford County 1915 

Northampton County 1882 

Bertie County 1898 

Northampton County 1900 

Bertie County 1874 

Bertie County 1883 

Northampton Count}^. . . .' 1880 

Bertie County 1854 

Hertford County 1729 

Northampton County 1820 

Hertford County 1839 

Hertford County 1843 

Hertford County 1908 

Bertie County 1910 

Hertford County 1894 

Northampton County 1883 

Northampton County 1808 

Hertford County 1837 

Bertie County 1911 

Bertie County 1803 

Northampton County 1854 

Northampton County 1885 

Northampton County 1848 

Bertie County 1804 

1913 



Bertie County 1750 

Northampton County 1889 

Bertie County 1885 

Northampton County 1896 

Hertford County 1883 

Hertford County 1885 

Hertford County 1873 

Northampton County 1902 



/ 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

FORTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

IHest Cliowan Baptist Association 

HELD WITH 

Elam Baptist Church, Northampton County, 
OCTOBER 24 and 25, 1922. 



The next session to be held with Murfreesboro Church, Hertford 
County, beginning on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October, 
1923. 

To preach the sermon, J. P. Essex. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 
Nash Brothers, Printers and Binders 
1922 



MINUTES 

i.: OF THE 

FORTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

IHest Cliowai] Baptist /Issociation 

HELD WITH 

Elam Baptist Church, Northampton County, 

OCTOBER 24 and 25. 1922. 



The next session to be held with Murfreesboro Church, Hertford 
County, beginning on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October, 
1923. 

To preach the sermon, J. P. Essex. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 
Nash Brothers, Printers and Binders 
1922 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS. 



Resident Pastors. 

D Cale Potecasi, N. C. 

B. B. Barnes.^ Colerain, N. C. 

John F. Cale Roxobel, N. C. 

R. B. Lineberry Colerain, N. C. 

J. W. Downey Severn, N. C. 

W. R, Halght Windsor, N. C. 

W. H. HoUowell Kelford, N". C. 

L. E. Dailey Colerain, N. C. 

J. H. Barnes Merry Hill, N. C. 

Geo. D. Leggett Windsor, N C. 

E. N. Gardner Pendleton, N. C. 

J. W. Whitley Murfreesboro, N. C. 

S. F. Bristow Colerain, N. C. 

H. G. Bryant Murfreesboro, N. C. 

v. E. Duncan Winton, N. C. 

Jesse Blalock Rich Square, N. C. 

J P. Essex Tackson, N. C, 

R. R. Lanier Seaboard, N. C. 

E. J. Isenhower Ahoskie, N. C. 

A. E. C. Pittman Windsor, N. C. 

J.Fred Stimpson Winton, N. C. 

Non-Resident Pastor. 

T. S. Crutchfield Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

Ordained M inisters» Not Pastors. 

R. T. White Conway, N. C. 

F. B. Raymond Como N. C. 

OFFICERS. jj 

Dr. C. G. Powell, Moderator Ahoskie, N. C.lj 

W\ D. Barbee. Vice-Moderator Seaboard, N. C. 

R. B. Lineberry, Clerk Colerain, N. C. 

W. A. Thomas, Treasurer Cofield. N. C. 

Jno. F. Cale, Historian Roxobel, N.. C. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Dr. C. G. Powell, W. D. Barbee, R. B. Lineberry, H. G. Bryant 
J. T. Bolton, J. H , Matthews, N. W. Britton, P. M. Fleetwood, J. J, 
Taylor, Mrs. E. B. Vaughan, Miss Una White, Mrs. Herberf 
Jenkins, 



WEST CHOWAN AS'S'OCIATION. 



S 



ssociation meets, with Obituaries, incidents, and other facts of the 
year that should be preserved, and make report to the next Asso- 
ciation. 

Art'. 16. On: the first day of the session there shall be appointed 
a committee of finance, committee on time, place, and preacher and 
a committee of one from each county to nominate representatives 
of Boards and to nominate an Executive Committee of twelve mem- 
bers to be composed of the Moderator, Vice-Moderator, Clerk and 
at least one woman from each of the counties. 

Art. 17. This Constitution may be altered at any annual session 
of the body by a vote of two-thirds of the members present 

Resolutions. 

Resolved (1) That no church shall be entitled to representation 
m this body unless in perfect accord with the Constitution thereof, 
that fact to be ascertained by a committee of five on credentials, 
appointed at each session of the body immediately after organiza- 
tion; (2) the report of this committee shall be the property of the 
Association just as any other report. (Adopted 1898.) 

Resolved (3) That henceforth this Association withdraw fellow- 
ship from any church that allows itsi members to engage in the 
manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors as a beverage. (1891.) 

Resolved (4) That it is the sense of this Association that selling 
intoxicating liquors through a dispensary is a violation of the spirit 
and letter of the resolution of our Constitution. (1905.) 



RULES OF ORDER. 

1. The Association shall convene annually at the time and place 
of its own adjournment. 

2. During each annual session it shall meet and adjourn from 
day to day at the hours fixed upon by the body. 

3. All meetings of the Association shall be opened and closed 
with religious exercises. 

4. A majority of the members present shall be a quorum for the 
transaction of business. 

5. No member shall absent himself temporarily without leave 
of the Moderator, nor finally without leave of thq bod^y. 

6. No member shall speak more than twice on the same subject 
without permission of the body. 

7. No memV.er s"'Tall be allowed to talk, stand up, read or move 
about the house during business, except to gain or impart informa- 
tion under consideration, 

8 No committee shall be in session during the hour of business 
without permission from the body. 

S. All questions of order not herein provided shall be decided 
by Meli's Parliamentary Practice 



FORTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 



ORDER OF BUSINESS. 
First Day. 

10:00 A. M. — Devotional Service, R. R. L.amer. 

JO: 30 A. M. — P]nroll Delegates, Organize, Welcome Visitors, Call 

•hvircfhes not reporting last year. 
11:00 A. M. — Receive new churches. 
11:10 A. M. — Biblical Recorder. 
11:30 A. M. — Sermon, J. P. Essex. 
12:30 P. M.— Recess. 

1:45 P. M. — Praise Service, A. E„ C. Pittman. 

2:00 P. M. — Report on Missions, State, Home, Foreign and Wo- 
man's Work. 

3:20 P. M. — Miscellaneous. 

3:30 P. M. — Assignment Delegates. 

7:00 P. M. — Praise Service, J. F. Stimpson... 

7:30 P. M. — To be arranged for at Association. 



Second Day. 



9 


30 


A. 


M.- 


— Devotional Siervice, D. Cale. 





45 


A. 


M.- 


—Report on Education. 


10:05 


A. 


M- 


—Discussion Sunday Schools. 


10 


25 


A. 


M.- 


-Discussion B. Y. P. U. 


10 


45 


A. 


M.- 


—Discussion Chowan College. 


11 


15 


A. 


M.- 


—Other Colleges and Schools. 


11 


35 


A. 


M.- 


—Ministerial Education. 


11 


55 


A. 


M.- 


—Report Social Service. 


12 


15 


P. 


M.- 


—Discussion Orphanage. 


12 


45 


P. 


M.- 


—Recess. 


1 


45 


P. 


M.- 


—Discussion Ministerial Relief. 


2 


00 


P. 


M.- 


—Hospitals. 


2 


15 


P. 


M.- 


—Historian's Report. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Missions — B, J. Isenhower, Jesse Blalock, Miss Una White. 
Education — J. W. Whitley, V. E. Duncan, Miss Eunice McDowell. 
Social S'ervice— L. E. Dailey, S. F. Bristow, W. H. Hollowell. 



PROCEEDmOS. 



October 24, 1922. 

The West Ghowaii Association met at 10 o'clock A. M. tx> 
day in its fortieth annual session witli the Elani Baptist 
chnrch, Xorthani])t()n Connty. 

Uevotional exercises conducted by H. G. Bryant, after 
which the Association was. called to order by the Moderator, 
C. H. fJ en kins. Delegates were enrolled as follows: 

LIST OF DELEGATE'S. 

Ahoskie— C. G. Powell, *W. L, Curtis, *C. C. Hoggard, *S. B. 
Vaughan. 

Ashley's Grove — L. T. Parker, *Craigg Revell, *C. R. Revell. 

Askewville— *J. J. White, *J. W. White. 

Aulander— *W. J. Dunning, *J. A. Burden, -G. C. Mitchell. 

Bethany — *H. L. Parker, *R. L. Byrum, =^.1. W. Keeter. 

Bethel— *E. L Bass, *W. R. Massey. 

Bethlehem— W. A. Thomas, W.. E. Perry. 

Brantley's Grove — A. O. Kiff, *J. W. Overton, Jr.^ *P. D. Parker. 
Buckhorne — 9. P. Winborne, Mrs. S. P. Winborne, R. O. Whitley, 
*Hugh Lee. 

Capehart's— *H. R. Smith, *P. F. Cobb, *S. J. Ward. 
Cashie— J. H. Matthews, E. L. Catling, *W. L. Powell, *Herbert 
W. Early. 

Center Grove— C. S. Godwin, J. R. Williford, J. D. Jenkins. 
Christian Harbor— *W. A. Burch^ *S'. Hare, *.J. L. Blythe.. 
Colerain— ^E. White, Rev. S. F. Bristow, Paul Pratt, *C. R. Brinbley 
Connaritsa— *John P. Marris, *John P. Slade, *R. L. Cowand. 
Conway— *R., V. Nelson, *T. B. Davis, *J. F. Martin. 
Creeksville — .T. T. Lanier, Nezzie Davis, J. A. Lanier. 
Earley's— *J. Bi. Earley, *G. B. Lassiter. 
Elam— T. J. Taylor, W. T. Cordle, Jack Coker. 
Galatia — *F. P, Barnes, *R. J. Briston, L. E. Liverman, Burden 
Barnes. 

Greene's X Roads — G. W. Castellow, *D. W. Castellow, *Luther 
L. Asbell. 

Harrellsvllle — *M. W. Newsome, *S. E. Harrell. 

Hebron— *H. T. Vann, *E. H Joyner. 

Holly Grove — J. H. Harmon, D. T. Harmon. 

Holly Springs— P. W. Perry, J. H. Evans, *R. W. Peele. 

Horton's — H. W., Greene, *L. E. Rawls, *Walter Powell. 

Jackson — W. L. Stephenson, L. J. Holloman. 

Kelford— *W. C. Evans, C. L. L. Cobb, Ponsie Newsome. 

Lasker — ^J. H. Holloman^ J. A. Liverman. 



s 



FORTIETH ANNUAL. SESSION 



Ijawrence — *W. L. Thompson, *Coiinaughton Cobb, *T. R. Oder. 
Lewiston — Dr. W. Mitchell, R. H. Minton, *W. Modlin. 
Margarettsville— J. G, Stancill, *J. G. Piland. 
Mars Hill— Solomon Miller, E. J. Miller, G. H. Powell, *Andrew 
Miller. 

Meherrin — G. L. Vann, Dallas Warren, B. F. Carter. 
' Menola— *J. L. Snipes, *J. T. Chetty, *C. W, Parker. 
Merry Hill— *M. C. Minton, *Miles White, *R. E. Harrell. 
Mount Carmel — C. G. Matthews, T. J. Stephenson, *A. B. Cowan. 
Mount Tabor — j. A. Parker, H. O. Boulter, T. T. Parker. 
Murfreesboro — E. B. Vaughan, C. E, Boyette, Elma Parker. 
Oak Grove — Letter after Association. 
Pine Forest— W. H. Camp, J. E. Moody. 

Pleasant Grove — *C. A. Dunning^ *E. B. Parker, *W. E. Leggett. 
Potecasi— J.. R. Baugham, =*^W. H. Beale, C. W. Blow. 
Powellsville — H. O. Raynor, J. W. Holloman. 

Republican— A. V. Cobb, *G. C. Butler, *J. K. Biutler, *J, G. Ward. 
Rich Square— J. T. Bolton, J. R, Elliott, W. F. Hunter. 
Riverside— *N. J. Miller, *H. H. Williams. 
Roanoke— J. H. Braswell, *C. J. Futrell. 

Robert's Chapel — *D. M. Woodard, J. H. Stephenson, Charlie 
Nelson. 

Ross's— *W. W. Mitchell, G. C. Castellow, J. W. Cowans, *Owen 
White. 

Sandy Run— *J. M. Jacobs, *B. F. Burkett, *J. A, Watson, *W. T. 
Smith. 

Seaboard — J. P. Spencer, J. T. Long, Paul Pruden. 

Severn — J. J. White, J. L.. Joyner, *W. H. Howell, 

Siloam — T. R. Speller, *Jerry Butler. 

St. John— *J. H. Futrell. Hugh Cook. 

Union— * J. A. Copeland, *Cola Horton, *J. L. Darden. 

Winton— W. H. Lassiter, N. W. Britton, *M. F. Herring. 

Woodland— C. G. Parker, *G. M. Holloman, *J. C. Vaughan. 

Marked thus (*) not answering roll call. 

Moderator C TT. Jenkins in the organization asked that 
some one else l)e selected as Moderator. The following offi- 
eer8 wore elected: Dr. (\ G. Powell, IModerator; W. I). Bar- 
bee, Vice-M'oderator ; R. ]>. I.incberrv^ Clerk; AY. A. Thomas, 
Treasnrer; Jno. F. Calc. Historian. 

Th(i folloAving n(>w pastors were recogiiized : E. rJ. Tsen- 
hnwcr. J. P. Essex, lu Iv. f anicr, A. E. (\ Pittman. 

Vi^itinii' hrethiH n wcrr rcccMinized as folloAvs: T)rs. 0. E. 
]yad<lrv, M. L. Kesler m-d Pcvs. (\ E. Edwards, W. Pv. Beach, 
J. W. Powland. AV. P. Beach s])r=ke in behalf of the Biblical 



WEST CHOWAN ASS'OClATlON. 



Kecorder. Annual sermon by Rev. Julius W. Whitley ; text 
Jno. 12:32. 

The Pastor made announcement aa to dinner. 

Benediction by L. E. Dai ley. 



TUESDAY — Afternoon Session. 

Devotional service conducted by W. H. Hollowell. W. D. 
Barbee ap])ointed as finance committee. 

Committer on Time and Place of next meeting: H. G. 
Bryant, d. G. Stancill, J. H. Matthews. 

Order of l)usiness was changed to allow Dr. Kesler to speak 
at 3 P. . 

Introductory read by V. E. Duncan as follows: 
MISISlONiS. 

There is one God, one Gospel, and one world. Since the world 
was created, has been preserved, and is sustained by God, since the 
Gospel is from God for the world, therefore it is adapted to the 
peoples of the whole world. So God's people have just one Mission; 
that is to carry God's Gospel to all the world. Wherever we are 
at work in giving the people the Gospel it is God's work. It is one 
Mission every where hut for the sake of convenience we divide this 
Mission into Missions, Foreign Missions, Home Missions, State 
Missions, These are the departments of one work: not different 
works, not even are they different appeals to our people for one 
work. We distructively dismember the mission principle when we 
divide the subject of Missions into three separate appeals, a fatal 
vivisection still advocated by many of our people, and practiced by 
a few in the designations of gifts. The distinction in the three is 
geographical. 

Diiferent stages in the process of mission work are marked by 
these distinctions. Foreign Missions starts the work. State Missions 
finishes it. Foreign Missions is the Gospel working outward. State 
Missions is the Gospel working inward. Home Missions Is working 
intermediate. 

Foreign Missions plants the Gospel in all countries — it did so 
even in our own, — but no country will ever be won to Christ until 
it has developed Home and State Missions of its own. These two, 
must, one day, do work even in China; the day will come when 
Chinese Christians will spend more money and men in state and 
home missions in China than all Christendom will ever spend for 
I'oreign Missions in China. For the sake of Foreign Missions; 
Southern Baptist and others support State and Home Missions, 



10 



FORTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 



in heathen lands we carry on Foreign Missions for the sake of get- 
ting Sitate and Home Missions started among the heathen. 

The above considerations resulted in the great 75 Million Cam- 
paign, tlie first effort of S'outhern Baptists worthy of comparison 
in strength and the world challenge that we have had. In consid- 
eration of the fact, undeniable, that the Gospel of God is for all 
peoples, that all are capable of comprehending it, that all are 
within the scope of its power, and that with the coming of its 
message there is weighty respensibility, we find ourselves in a sit- 
uation that demands consecration of the unusual type, a conse- 
cration that will write a different history than that last year we 
gave to self-indulgence more than forty-three dollars per capita 
and to all church purposes a few cents more than $10.00 per capita. 
Comparing last year with other years in all points, we did well 
but when we compare what we gave for the non-essentials with 
what we gave to all church purposes, we are found wanting. May 
the history of the coming year be more worthy of our ability. 

V. E. DUNCAN, 

For Committee. 

State Alis^-icii reptn-t was roarl l)v J. IT. Matthews as fol- 
io -a's : 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

We are now nearing the close of the third year of our Baptist 
75 Million Campaign. The results flowing from thai stupendoiis 
effort — -spiritual, social and financial — are marvellous. For three 
>ear9 we have had the greater part of our Baptist hosts in motion. 
Those without have ^:-een the activity within, have heard purposes 
declared, have heard hopes expressed and doctrines expounded. 
Conviction has followed inquiry and discussion stirred seekers after 
tnith. Since the 75 Million Campaign was put on, more than 
G(',000 persons have been baptised into the fellowship of the Bap- 
tist churches in North Carolina. The greater part of these were 
not of the original pledgers in the Campaign. The statement has 
been made that forty per cent of the Baptists of North Care l.'na 
had no part in our great campaign, the greatest thing ever ui: Jer- 
taken by the Baptist people in all the history of Christianity. In 
our approaching Reinforcement Campaign now organizing^ those 
who took no part originally and those v/ho have come in since, 
will be given an opportunity to pledge for the two remaining years 
Not a single loyal Baptist in the great State of North Carolina will 
be left out. 

Our motto should be — "Every Baptist asked and every Baptist 
giving." 

The campaign in North Carolina has been a glorious success in 
every particular. There has been a marvelous increase in attend- 



WEST CHOWAN ArfS'OCIATION. 



11 



ance in Sunday School and preaching services. There have been 
more Baptist Young People's Unions organized within six months 
than in any one year of our history. The Woman's Missionary 
Union is grov^^ing and enlarging and rapidly becoming one of the 
most active forces in our denominational work. 

Our Corresponding Siecretary has recently issued a report on 
what the Compaign has wrought in North Carolina, in which he 
gives a summary of the S'tate Mission results, and from which I 
quote — "The whole state mission program has been organized into 
departments and the details of organization are being worked out 
as fast as possible. We might sum up the work of the various 
departments in brief as follows: 

The Department of Missionary-Pastoral Assistance: — There are 
about 210 missionary-pastors in the employ of the State Mission 
Board. These men serve 350 churches and mission stations. We 
pay these men varying amounts, all the way from $.5 per month to 
S175 per month. The pay-roll is about $5,500 per month for the 
missionaries alone. We are assisting in the payment of the salary 
of almost every man at a college or school center. We believe it 
is vitally important to have a strong preacher and pastor hard by 
every school, whether it be a state school or a Baptist school; a 
farm life school in the country, or the great university. In the 
counties of Hyde and Dare there is only one Baptist pastor in each 
and the State Mission Board pays the salary of one and half the 
salary of the other. These counties could not have Baptist preach- 
ing were it not for the help of the State Mission Board 

Department of Sunday Schools: We now have a secretary, two 
field secretaries and an elementary worker. We are making great 
progress in Sunday school organization and teacher training. We 
have 2,225 Baptist Sunday schools in North Carolina, while we 
have a little less than 2,300 Baptist churches. 

Baptist Young People's Union: The work is growing in a mar- 
velous way. We now have over 800 Unions in the state and they 
are being organized very rapidly and in great numbers. We are 
training a generation of young church members in the B. Y. P. U.'s 
who will transform the churches in ten years. No department of 
our statel work has made greater progress than the Baptist Young 
People's Union. 

Enlistment and Country Church: There are nearly 2,300 churches 
in North Carolina. About 1,800 are countn^ churches. Many of 
these country churches have preaching only once each month and 
often the pastor has to go a long distance to reach his church or 
churches. We have a Superintendent of Enlistment with about 
five men under him. These men are giving themselves wholly to 
the problem of enlisting and developing the country churches. 
Much is being done toward the formation of fields and tlTe In- 
c^rease of the salary of the pastors. The biggest problem confront- 
ing North Carolina Baptists is this country cfhurch problem. We 



12 



FORTIETH ANNUAL SE3SSION 



are putting on the biggest country church program North Carolina 
}3aptists have ever known. 

Church Building: We are trying to provide adequate church and 
Sunday school equipment at every school center and in every 
county seat as well as in all growing towns. The house at the 
university is well on the way to completion and the Sunday school 
unit of the Pullen church at the A. & E. College is nearing com- 
pletion. We have assisted in building houses at a number of 
strategic centers this year. We need sorely a large building fund 
for the assistance of weak and struggling churches. We could 
easily spend with profit a quarter of a million dollars; for church 
buildings at state mission points this year, and then hardly touch 
the need. 

Evangelism: We have organized a Department of Evangelism 
with a superintendent and three men under him. We have strong 
men who are in great demand and they had a wonderful year of 
of ingathering. This department is destined to fill a need long 
acute in our mission work. The department will almost be self- 
sustaining tlie first year., 

Book Department: We organized a book department a little more 
than a year ago. The siales' have increased) steadily every month 
and we are now able to furnish any and everything needed by a 
Baptist church in its work. We hope to build up a great book 
business thab will enable us to sow North Carolina down with Bap- 
tist literature and tracts. All we make on the book department 
goes back into the work of state missions." 

I make no apology for this lengthy extract from this excellent re- 
port. It is authentic and shows the Baptists in action in our great 
State. IBvery agency of life is at work, we are touching the life 
of the people more c:losely and broadly than ever, churches and 
Sunday schools are multiplying, with rapidity and the citizenship 
of the State is being greatly strengthened thereby. In orphanage, 
hospitals and other agencies of relief, we are supplying very press- 
ing needs. The acceptance of the superintendence of our Hos- 
pital at Winston-Salem by Rev. G. T. Lumpkin stamps success over 
the door of that undertaking. 

In the midst of the great advance, we have a clarion call to enter 
the Reinforcement Campaign. The work of winding up the five year 
campaign is to be accelerated and encouraged by this special effort 
beginning November first. In the 75 Million Campaign this Asso- 
ciation was asked for $375,000. They pledged $402,120.8y.. They 
have paid on this pledge up to September 13, 1922, $162,467.08. There 
is a balance due at the close of the Conventional year, November 
30th, of $78,805.16. This is the amount to be raised by the churches 
of this Association in the Reinforcement Campaign next month. 
It is a stupendous task, but we can do it and we must do it. 

Brethren, we know exactly what is before us, we know individ- 
ually our prospective contributors, the task is plain. Let it not be 



WEST CHOWAN ASiSOCIATION. 



13 



said that th^ West Chowan Association, containing within its bor- 
ders churches older than the Republic, where earliest of all lands 
our Baptists of ancient days planted, watered and grew, has failed 
her sister Associations in this work of the Master. 

J. H. MATTHEWS, 
For the Committee. 

Report on Home Missions read by J. W. Downey as fol- 
lows : 

HOME MISfSION REPORT. 

West Chowan Association held at Elam Baptist Church, N. C, 
October 24', 1922- 

Evangelism, enlightenment and enlistment form the keynote of 
the work of the Home Mission Board. 

The harvest was never whiter nor the laborers more tireless 
nor their rewards more abundant. 

The Department reports set forth a mighty work accomplished 
despite the untoward conditions that have beset the Board. 

I. Departmental Work. — There are nine departments of the work 
of our Home Mission Board. Suffer a brief statement as to each. 

1. Co-operative Missions. — This is the great unifying work of our 
denomination. The oldest and largest feature of this co-operative 
work has been what we call "Co-operative Missiions". Indeed, at 
the beginningi of the work and for years this constituted the chief 
part of the Board's activities. 

Where the State Convention is unable to sufficiently aid in king- 
dom-building work, the Home Board co-operates with the State 
Convention in siuch work as church building and as denominational 
efficiency may demand. 

2. Enlistmient. — A little more than one dozen years ago the Home 
Board established the Department of Enlistment. The necessity 
for this department grew out of the universal cry from the leaders 
of our denomination for more efficient co-operation on the part of 
the large ma&s of inactive Baptists in( the South.. 

Eleven thousand of our Southern Baptist churches, out of a total 
oi twenty-six thousand are giving nothing to co-operative work. 
Notwithstanding the high pressure of the 75 Million Campaign. 
We must also face the fact that the majority of the members of 
our active churches are inactive in the co-operative work of the 
churches. There are great possibilities and responsibilities along 
the lines of enlistment. 

3. Evangelism. — The year just closing has been, beset with many 
difficulties — the financial conditions, the disturbances in adjust- 
ment of business affairs toward normal conditions and other 
factors. 

The motto: '*Every One Win One," proposed at the Convention 



FORTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 



in Chattanooga for the new year, struck a popular chord. Evi- 
dences are abundant to the effect that hundreds and thousands of 
our people have become individual soul-winners. This no doubt 
has had much to do with the fine success that has attended revival 
services throughout our territory. Evangelism, statistics. professed 
conversion 30,070, additions by Baptism 15,583, additions by letter 
and otherwise 6,506. Total additions 22,089. This and more was 
accomplished by 44 workers in the field. 

4. Mountain Schools. — These schools are located in the desti- 
tute mountain districts, and a power for good. A field for great 
opportunity. Dr. A. E. Brown, who is and has been a faithful Sup' 
erintendent for several years gives the following statistics: 

Number of schools, 36 ; number of students, 6,057 ; number of min- 
isterial students, 227; number of conversions. 509; value of property, 
$1,767,000. 

The people living in these isolated places are our Baptist people, 
and need not only trained teachers for our schools but trained 
nurses and community workers. 

5. Foreigners, Indians and Negroes. — Th? more than 4,000,000 
foreigners in the territory of the Southern Baptist Convention, 
create a problem at once ac^jte and sorious even witiiout further 
accessions by immigration. We are doing some work among the 
foreigners in each State where they live. We need very much a 
plant for school work in San Antonia among the Mexicans. We 
have at El Paso, Texas, a large and interesting school for Mexi- 
cans; but use the Baptist church building for thisi purpose. 

Statistics of work among the Foreigners: Churches and stations, 
101; Baptisms, 917; Churches organized^ 15; church houses built, 
5; Sunday Schools organized, 33.. 

Indians. — There are 161,941 Indians within the territory of the 
S'outhern Baptist Convention; besides many more of mixed blood. 

Number of workers among them, 10; churches and stations, 23; 
baptisms, 219; Siunday schools organized, 4. 

Negroes. — Our activities in behalf of the negro are carried on 
as follows: We have a co-operative work with the Home Mission 
Pioard of the National Baptist Convention (Negro) in which there 
are eighteen missionary workers employed jointly by their Home 
Mission Board and our board. These are doing good work and 
this plan is to be commended from the fact that it encourages the 
negro in self help and fosters his independence. 

Work among them is as follows: Number of workers, 34; Bap- 
tisms, 11,826; churches constituted, 92. 

6. Cuba and Panama. — We believe the time is ripe for a more 
aggressive campaign along all lines, especially Evangelism. The 
years of seed sowing have laid a foundation and made this possible. 
There are teeming masses all about, who are not reached by our 



WEST CHOWAN ASS'OCIATION. 



15 



fixed preaching places. We are hoping to have an evangelistic force 
that can be more or less tree from other duties. 

Some work done. Number of ordained workers native and for- 
eign, 34; baptized during the year, 412; other professions not bap- 
tized, 775; total church membership, 2,157. 

Conditions and opportunities are bright for good progress in the 
future. 

Panama. — Our work in Panama is small but very important. Work 
being done. Number of workers, 3. Churches and stations, 13; 
baptisms, 67 ; total additions, 181. 

We need more workers and church houses and homes for the 
workers. 

7. Soldiers and Seamen. — Soldier Work. — Our work among the 
soldiers has been confined this year to the states of Maryland, 
Oklahoma, Texas, and Kentucky, the major portion of which has 
been in Texas. During the year the Board has undertaken work 
at the tubercular hospital at Oteen, N. C, where there are some 
1200 soldiers afflicted with tuberculosis. Our missionary is Rev. 
J. A. McKaughan. This appeals mightily to our people because of 
the dread disease and the sentiment connected with our soldier boys 
who are afflicted with this plague. 

Statistics, Army and Camp Service: Number of Workers, 14; 
professions of faith, 938; baptisms, 309. 

Seamens' Institute, Jacksonville, Fla. — The past year has been 
the greatest in the history of the work at the Institute since it 
was organized in 1915 and incorporated by the Baptist Home Board 
September 1, 1919. S'ince that time the Institute has made a great 
record and has expanded in everydepartment. 

Last year there were conducted 177 religious services at which 
1,692 seamen made a decision to live Christian lives and 680 en- 
rolled as members of the Bible class, which has a total enrollment 
of 2,018 seamen, representing every State in the Union, and forty- 
eight different nationalities, this being the largest class of Sea- 
men in the world. 

8. Department of Church Extension. — So long as our gracious 
women are by the instinct of mother tenderness, so long as our 
stalwart men pulse to the appeal of need and suffering, the cry of 
the homeless churches will find a quick response. 

The accomplishment of the past, in that 1,573 churches have 
been enabled to build because of aid received from this Depart- 
ment, is the barest outline of what has been done. 

The basis of accomplishment for the future is shown by the 
statement of our Loan Fund assets in the sum of $1,083,107.24; 
collected and operative, and $575,216.17 in pledges which will be- 
come operative as collected. This total is $1,658,323.41. 

9. Publicity Department. — At the annual meeting of the Board 
last June Dr. B, C. Henning was elected Superintendent of the 



FORTIETH ANNUAL. SESSION 



Department of Foreigners, Indians, and Negroes, which previously, 
in addition to his other duties the Corresponding Secretary had 
directed. 

The Publicity Department was put permanently under the direc- 
tion of the Secretary, and he is doing a great work in keeping be- 
fore our people our dangers, needs, resources and successes, by 
publication of articles in denominational weeklies, distribution of 
tracts, leaflets and charts. "Home and Foreign Field" has been 
well supplied with Home Mission material from month to month 
and the magazine has never had a greater variety of information 
and stimulating treatment of Home Missions. ^ 

A summary of the Results of the Home Mission Board in the 
past three years. 

During the three years of the Campaign periodj this agency has 
employed on its own account and through its co-operative work 
an average of 1,495 missionaries, and reports for that period 134,832 
baptisms; 218,371 additions to the churches; 2,276 Sunday Schools 
and 759 churches organized; 1,409 houses of worship built or re- 
paired, and 9,523 volunteers for special Christian service. 

In addition to its work along evangelistic and enlistment lines, 
the Home Board reports the completion of its $1,000,000 Church 
Building Loan Fund, launching of an encouraging work among the 
Jews; establishment at Jacksonville, Fla., of the Seamen's Institute, 
■\'ast improvement in 38 mountain mission schools with more than 
6,000 pupils, establishment at El Paso of a modern tuberculosis 
sanatorium, and strengthening of its work in Panama and Cuba, 
and among the foreigners, Indians and Negroes. 

Let our souls be aflame with the opportunity of supporting the 
Home Mission Board, for the Lord and Master is knocking at your 
door, naked, cold, hungry, sore-foot, shelterless. What shall your 
answer be? Respectfully submitted, 

J. W. DOWNEY. 

Foreiixii Mission vo]-)ort wiis \va(] hy IT. G. Bryant as fol- 
lows; : 

FOREIGN MISSION REPORT. 

To the West Chowan Association, Elam Church, October 24, 1922. 

At the last session of 'the Southern Baptist Convention in Jack- 
sonville, Florida, in May of this year, the Foreign Mission Board 
closed seventy-seven years of continuous work. This being the 
second year on the fourth quarter of a century of united effort upon 
the part of Southern Baptists to givet the gospel of Christ to the 
lost nations of the earth. As we watch with prayerful interest the 
denomination move toward the close of the first one hundred years 
service of this Board, we can but feel grateful in our hearts for the 
splendid growth of our work along all lines. The work of more 



WEST CHOWAN ASS-OCIATION. 



11 



than three quarters of a century of common burden-bearing, Con- 
secrated prayer and earnest effort by Southern Baptist has aston- 
ished the world and taught us many lessons. The road has not all 
been smooth. We have had many dark days and frequent halts in 
our work. As it was with the Apostle Paul, even so it has been 
\>ith the Foreign Mission Board, enemies have opposed and false 
bjethren have misrepresented the work. But in spite of all this 
the work has been glorious for our God has been leading us on. 
Through all the years the Board has never betrayed the confidence 
of the denomination, or the denomination lost confidence in the 
Board. 

In writing this fortieth annual report of the Foreign Mission 
Board to the West Chowan Association, it occurs to your committee, 
that two things should claim our attention: First, what has been 
done and second, what are the present needs of the Foreign Mis- 
sion Board. 

The 7.")-Million Campaign has greatly strengthened our work in 
all departments. Up to May 1, 1922, the Foreign Mission Board has 
received a total of $6,509,689.21 from the 75-Million Campaign. The 
convention year ending May the 1st, 1922 show total receipts from 
all sources for Foreign Missions of $1,814,598.32. These figures are 
considerably lower than last year, which was our high water mark 
in gifts to Foreign Missions. With the one exception, our falling 
off in gifts, the past year has been the best year in the history of 
the Board. The Board beside its regular work took an active part 
in Xear East and Jewish Relief work. Through the administration 
of the Board, $9-5,492.19 was given to this work. 

The faithfulness of the missionaries during the year has been all 
that we could hope for. The growth of the missionary institutions, 
the work which they have accomplished, the large number of con- 
verts they have baptized, the development of the native Christians, 
the increased friendliness of the native population for the mission- 
aries and their work has surpassed that of any year in the history 
of the Board. There are today more open doors to our missionaries 
than ever before. Last year the number of churches of our foreign 
fields were increased to 622, 7,891 new converts were baptized, the 
church membership increased to 64',251. The contributions to our 
mission work by native Christians amounted to $465,235. From 
.Tune, 1921, to December of th esame year seventy new missionaries 
v,'ere sent to the various fields. Others have been added that 
number since the convention in May of this year. 

Another accomplishment of the year that will be far reaching 
is the achievement of Religious Liberty in Europe. This is largely 
due to the untiring efforts of Dr. .1. H. Rushbrook. Baptist Com- 
missioner for Europe, in having repealed the famous Roumanian 
Ordinance Xo. 15,831. Under this Act many of our Roumanian 
Brethren have suffered many unjust and barbarous cruelties. 



18 FORTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 

During the year we have taken up work in Russia. On entering 
this new field the Board appropriated $7,000 to have the Bible print- 
ed and distributed in the Russian language. Along with the work 
in Russia w^e have taken up work in Spain, Jugo-S'lavia, Hungary, 
Roumania^ Ukraine, Palestine and, Syria, along with all this new 
work we have greatly enlarged our work on all the old fields. 

Our Educational Department under the special care of Miss Mary 
Hunter has had a very successful year. The report show^s a total of 
4,368 study classes, with an enrollment if 55,390 members. More 
■supplement material has been ordered for these classes than ever 
before. 

A careful and prayerful study of the report made by the Foreign 
'Mission Board to the Southern Baptist Convention, in Jacksonville, 
t'lorida, in May of this year, you will be impressed with the many 
mitstanding needs of this Board, Southern Baptists are no longer 
a i^eople confined to a few^ nooks and; corners of the earth, in their 
missionary enterprises. At last we have entered upon a worth 
"program for our Lord. We are in China the largest nation of the 
world. We have so positioned ourselves with China, that we can 
do a better work there than any other people. We are in Japan, 
where we have greatly strengthened and enlarged our work dur- 
ing the last two years. We are in Mexico and Siouth America one 
of the strong-holds of Roman-Catholicism. We have long been in 
Italy and Africa. This gives to Southern Baptists, mission fields 
containing 900,000,000 souls. And every one of these fields are 
white unto harvest. Some of them are so white they cannot wait. 
Our opportunities will be lost and many of them lost forever if 
we fail at this time. 

This great expansion of territory will bring about a crisis in our 
Foreign Mission work, if it is not matched with a corresponding 
amount of resources. It is true that these new fields will call for 
larger contributions in money and missionaries. But many of these 
fields will soon be helping more than they are noW; being helped. 
If we mean to engage Baptists everywhere in a worthy Baptist pro- 
gram for the conquest of this world we must not let this opportunity 
pass. Southern Baptists have not yet touched the first 100,000,000 
people in China. And yet we have done more than any other board. 
Think of our great unfinished task in China alone. More than 
200,000,000 now untouched by our Board. We have one mission on 
the many islands of Japan and one station on another. This means 
that in Japan we have only touched the hem of the garment. Of 
the twenty-five Republics of S'outh America, we are doing mission 
w^ork in only five of them and here on the fringe for the most part. 
In Africa we have scarcely made a beginning, when we think of 
the millions there who have never heard of Jesus and His love. 

Another outstanding need of the Foreign Mission Board, which 
must be taken into account is the money to meet the expense of 



WEST CHOWAN ASS'OCIATION. 



19 



Liir increased program. Three things make the work of the Board 
more expensive, first the extension of our work on the old fields 
i'ljd entering new fields, to which reference has been made in this 
report. A second thing! that increases the expense of our mission 
work on the foreign field is an increase in the old rate of exchange, 
Once a few American dollars would buy a pocket full of native cur- 
rency, but that day has past. The third reason^ the standards of 
living in China are rising as they have in America. As China learns 
more of western civilization and customs, we may expect their liv- 
ing expenses to! increase in proportion. 

Again the constantly increasing number of young men and women 
who are volunteering for the foreign fields threatens our work with 
a crisis, if money to match these lives is not provided. There are 
now in our colleges and seminaries 969 volunteers for Foreign Mis- 
sion work, with another large number in our high schools. With 
$6,000,000,000 of the Lord's money in the hands of S'outhern Bap- 
tist and this increasing at the rate of $200,000,000 each year, can 
Southern Baptists say they are not able to use the products of our 
schools for the Lord's work on the foreign fields? Another great 
need of the board is to be able to use the natives who are graduat- 
ing from Mission Schools. It would be almost tragic to our work, 
to have to tell these graduates that we cannot use them. The 
Board cannot use them without the means to support them. Will 
Southern Baptists tie the hands of the Board at this point? 

Still another need of the Board is money with which to better 
equip and enlarge our Mission Schools. The Foreign Mission Board 
has 694 schools, with 26,507 students. With this we have only made 
a small beginning in our educational work on the fields. It is the 
height of folly for us to plan for a great world program, enlist men 
and women for the fight and advance into the enemy's country 
without equipping them with the needed resources. 

The writer in his report of the Foreign Mission Board to the last 
session of the Southern Baptist Convention mentioned three ways 
by which this need may be met. First by our pastors giving a 
larger place to pulpit instruction and admonition. Second, an equit- 
able appraisement of Foreign Missions will secure for this enter- 
prise a larger place in the program of our meetings. And third, 
an equitable appraisement of Foreign Missions, to come to the main 
point, will secure for this enterprise a larger share of our benevo- 
lences. These three suggestions your committee would recommend 
to the West Chowau Association for the next year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. G. BRYANT. 



20 



FORTIETH ANNUAL. SESSION 



Ileport on Woiiiaii's M'ork read by W. H. Stephenson as 
follows: 

REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK. 

It is nothing new, the idea of a Woman's, Missionary S'ociety. 
There was one back yonder on the hills of Galilee long ago. "And 
many women were there beholding afar off, which followed Jesus 
from Galilee, ministering unto him: Among which was Mary Mag- 
dalene, and Mary the mother of James and Joses, and the mother 
of Zebedee's children," Matt. 27:55-56. The work which it did will 
tell through all eternity. Some may look down upon such work 
as small and insignificant and think that clubs and high sounding 
social organizations mean more,, but the work in the world which 
tells most for humanity is the work which is done in the name of 
Jesus Christ. 

Woman's Work in the past centuries did not receive the atteu- 
tiontion that it does now. There were no organized efforts as now, 
nor were they given the encouragement to lead out into as full a 
Missionary endeavor as they might have done. Our State records 
show there were Woman's Missionary Societies in North Carolina 
in the early part of the 19th century, but there was no organized 
work until 1877 when a Woman's Central Committee of Missions 
was formed with Mrs. J, M. Heck, President, and Mrs. J, C. Scar- 
borough, Corresponding Secretary. Similar societies were reported 
that year. Their total contributions to Missions amounted to 
$342.16. The organization of this committee was reported to the 
Baptist State Convention in Durham, but strange as it may seem 
today there was decided opposition to Woman's Work for Missions 
by some of the ministers present. The lack of sympathy and sup- 
port caused the committee to disband and there is no record of 
v/ork done by Societies; until ]886 when the present Central Com- 
mittee was organized . That first year of organized work was large- 
ly correspondence with pastors of the S'tate endeavoring to arouse 
interest. From the beginning the contributions were divided be- 
tween Foreign, Home and State Missions which amounted to 
$1,000.95 for the first year. The work of the State continued to 
grow until the year 1915 when the totaK contributions from women 
am.ounted to $42,54^.86. Since then there has been a steady growth 
in contributions, they amounted to the sum of $314,000.00 in 1921. 

To-day our ministers feel the need of and encourage the women's 
organized work in our churches. 

Beginning 36 years ago as an Auxiliary to the iSouthern Baptist 
Convention the organization of women has passed from the day of 
small things to the place of great service and power in the work 
of the kingdom. The raising of money is not the only good thing 
they are accomplishing. The educational value of their work is 
beyond estimate. The study of missions and regular systematic 



WEST CHOWAN ASiSOCIATION. 



21 



giving has led to a love of missions and a sustained missionary 
effort which expresses itself in the training of the young and in 
their increased giving. In the Convention year of 1921-1922 there 
have been a gain in organizations of the Southern Baptist Conven- 



tion in — 

Woman's Missionary Societies 986 

Young Woman's Societies 440 

Girls' Auxiliary Societies 529 

Royal Ambassadors 325 

Sunbeam Societies 1193 



Total new organizations 3473 



Total new and old organizations 20,878. 

Total contributions from all sources $3,238,072.92. 

Of the 20,878 Societies 5931 reported 31,036 workers doing per- 
sonal service. This personal service includes Rescue Work, S'ew- 
ing for the poor, Americanization, Prison work, Distribution of 
Bibles, Garments distributed, Baskets and Traysi distributed, Nurs- 
ing the sick, and many other ways of helpfulness. 

But what are the women and children doing in the West Chowan 
Association? The last annual report of the Woman's Missionary 
Union last July says, "Notwithstanding these testing times the 
spirit of loyalty and co-operation among our women has been beau- 
tiful and our work continues on the upward trend. The financial 
report shows an increase in giving. The amount contributed to all 
objects was $15,802.94." 

"For the Johnson Fund the Union has raised $806.18." 

Amount paid in for Associational Expense Fund $134.20. 

The following number of magazines are taken: 

Home and Foreign Field 225 

Royal Service 223 

Biblical Recorder 523 

There were reported seven new Y. W. A.'s, making a total of 19 
in the Association. Total amount contributed by these to all ob- 
je<ng $791.96." 

"Number of Junior Societies — 68 with a membership of 1126, num- 
ber of churches with .Junior Societies — 42, number without 17. Sun- 
bt^am bands 42; Royal Ambassador Chapters 14, G. A. Societies 12. 

Total amount given by Junior bands $1825.58." 

The following Junior Societies attained all points on the Standard 
of Excellence; Sunbeams, Ahoskie; G. A.'s, Liewiston and Severn; 
W. M. Societies attaining all points on the Standard of Excellence 
were Mnrfreesboro, Powellsville and Lewiston." 

"The Bertie County Union are supporting two Bible women In 
China, and expect to continue their scholarship to the Training 
School." 



22 



FORTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 



Hertford County Union reports that churches are organized as 
never before for more efficient service., More Mission Study classes 
thani in any previous year. Mrs. Valeria Green Rankin being sup- 
ported in China by a woman of Hertford County." 

Northampton County Union reported a . most successful year's 
-workl done. Njotable progress made in Personal Service and Mis- 
sion Study." 

Our women have adopted as their watcliword — II Cor. 9:8 — "God 
is able." The chief aims are: individual and united prayer, enlist- 
ment and soul winning, regular Bible and Mission Study, organized 
and personal service, systematic and proportionate giving. They 
declare themselvesi on the side of those forces which make right- 
eousness throughout the world, standing loyally for our Mission 
fimdamenitals), patriotism and/ jniational proh^ibition, maintaining 
Sabbath observances, keep the home inviolate, lifting high the moral 
standards of womanhood and young life in home and society, urging 
a general re-establishment of the family altar and assisting in mak- 
ing America Christian, better industrial conditions as regards wo- 
men and children, public health, education and plenty of life. 

Surely they are accomplishing much good and their work stands 
for the upbuilding of Christ's Kingdom. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. HARRY STEPHENSON. 

On motion to adopt remarks were made by V. E. Dnncan 
and the time was extended '>() minutes for Dr. C. E. Maddrv 
to speak. Report adopted. Dr. M. 1^. Kesler spoke on the 
Thoniasville Orphanage. 

The folowing committee was appointed on Order of Busi- 
ness : E. J . Tsenhower, J. H . Barnes, B. B. Lanier and B. B. 
Lineberry. 

The following i-esolution offered by Jesse Blahx'k wa^ 
adopted : 

Resolved, That the Chairmen of the committees on Report of 
Education, report of Missions and report on Social Service he in- 
structed to limit their reports so that all reports under one general 
head will not cover more than twenty minutes. Amended that Chair- 
man of Committee prepare report. 

The following conmiittee was appointed to suggest amend- 
ments to the constitution and to nominate an executive com- 
mittee: J. W. Whitkry, J. ^y. Downey, L. E. Dailey. 

The Order of Business was change<l, giving J. IT. Matthews 
for the night service the hour of Orphanage and Ministerial 



WEST CHOWAN A'SS'OCIATION. 



28 



Eelief to-iiiorrow. Memos were assigned and adjourned with 
])rayer. 

Sermon at night by Rev. E. J. Isenhower. 



WKDXESDAY— AIoifxiNG Sessiox. 
Devotional service by S. 1>. Barnes. 

John F. Cale read re])ort on General Education and Snn- 
day Schools. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION. 
1. General Statement. 

Both government and religiion are interested in Education. Sep- 
aration of Church and State is a matter of divine as well as con- 
stitutional wisdom. Therefore, it is not the function of the State 
to teach religion; neither is it the prerogative of the church to oc- 
cupy herself with government. 

The State must educate in the interest of government. Religion 
without training is practically barren. The competency of a people 
to govern themselves depends upon a culture commensurate with 
the duties of citizenship. An ignorant people cannot function dem- 
ocratically. The State should work more definitely toward the elim- 
ination of illiteracy., Foreign immigration, the backwardness of 
the negro and the large number of native white illiterates make 
the elevation of our people as a whole through education an impera- 
tive necessity. 

The church must educate in the interest of religion. Training 
without religion is dangerous. As Baptists we believe that Chris- 
tian Education is elementary and fundamental. Our fathers reali- 
ized the need for trained religious leaders in their day, and sought 
ic supply it. A realization of such need in our day is begetting a 
new consciousness that leads to new and renewed denominational 
emphasis. 

2. Sunday Schools. 

The Sunday-school in divine economy occupies a place entirely 
unique. It stands between the family and the pulpit, forming a 
linking process between the two, supplementing the work of each. 

Baptist Sunday-school work was never jji a more prosperous con- 
dition than now. This department of our work is giving. General 
conditions are the most encouraging ever. The three years of the 
75-Million Campaign have been a period of great growth and de- 
velopment. The past year has shown the most marvelous growth 
Gt all. 

We are working along lines of general policies agreed upon by 
the last State Convention. These general policies involve: 



24 



FORTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 



(1) Enlistment.. We are meeting with success in our efforts to 
reach the unenlisted. Our records show a net gain in membership 
for the year of 234,000 in the South and 26,700 in North Carolina. 
The task, however, of enrolling the unenlisted is a great one. More 
than 500,000 are yet unreached by any school. 

(2) Organization and Equipment. We are working for adequate 
organization and equipment in every school. It would be impossible 
to tabulate all the improvements. Many of these, however, are 
evidenced in the remodeling of old houses and in the building of 
new ones with a view of properly housing and cari^g for our Sun- 
day-school work; also in class organization and in grading and stand- 
ardizing our schools. We have more standard schools than ever 
before. Only six of these, however, are in our Association. 

(3) Teaching the Bible to Save and Train in Service, This, after 
all, is the real task of the Sunday-school. But to accomplish such a 
task our teachers must be trained. The last S'tate Convention au- 
thorized a campaign in country and village churches for the pur- 
pose of training workers. Prom June 5 to Sept. 5 fifteen special 
workers co-operated with our regular workers in putting on this 
campaign. We tabulate some results: 



Number Institutes held 271 

Number Churches represented. 496 

Number Pupils enrolled 10,144' 

Number Eixaminations taken 2,030 

Number Visitors attending 8,22.5 



Number Enrolled in Correspondence Course 1,654 

The Sunday-school offers not only a great evangelistic opportun- 
ity, but an opportunity equally as great in Christian service. We 
should enter this double door of opportunity with larger programs 
and more aggressive policies. JOHN F. CALE, 

For Committee. 

Report oil I>. Y. P. I", road hy P. S. Vaiin as follows: 
REPORT ON BAPTIST YOUNG PEOPLE'S UNION. 

This year marks a distinct era in B. Y. P. U. work of the South- 
ern Baptist Convention. No one previous year has seen so many 
significant changes in this department. North Carolina is among the 
five leading states in this movement. The West Chowan Associa- 
tion stands fifth in number of B. Y. P. U.'s, and stands third in num- 
ber of young people enlisted in B Y. P. U work. 

This year the B. Y. P. U. has been divided into three departments 
instead of two. An Intermediate Department has been introduced. 
This department has not yet found its way into our association, so 
we need to put forth an extra effort to get the intermediate work 
organized. 



WEST CHOWAN ASS'OCIATION. 



25 



The literature for the B. Y. P. U. is very carefully prepared. There 
is no reading matter for young people which is so systematically 
arranged. The Study Course, as mapped out by our B. Y. P. U. lead- 
ers, trains the young people for greater use in the Master's King- 
dom. 

The purpose of the B. Y. P. U. is to enlist every young Christian 
in some phase of Christian service. Through the graded system 
of the B. Y. P. U. work, the motto of the Union ''AH Baptist Young 
People Utilized" is becoming a reality. 

Our one desire now is to get a B. Y. P. U. in every church in our 
Association. This can best be brought about through our Associa- 
tional B. Y. P. U. 

Every other branch of our religious work — S. S.. W. M. U., Mission 
Boards, etc., are looking to the B. Y. P. U. for trained workers 

PRiESTOX S'. VAXX. 

Cliowaii ( 'olh 20 i"('])ort i-ead bv W. I). liai'lieo: 
REPORT OF CHOW AX COLLEGE. 

Education is the basic principle upon which civilization is founded. 
Without it no civilization can attain a high standard of existence. 
Nations, like individuals, gi'oping in the shadow of ignorance^ can- 
not attain greatness nor even command respect. And yet the right 
type of training is essential to the proper development of a nation, 
a state or an individual. A nation or a civilization educated in the 
wrong way becomes a menace to mankind and will eventually give 
all who come under its influence, ideals that will be detrimental to 
them and finally ends in destruction. Xations and individuals could 
be cited to illustrate this thought. So we must realize that it is a 
fearfully serious thing to educate a child. You are developing in 
him power, for some good or bad, and it is my peculiar notion at 
present that we should lay more stress and emphasis upon the type 
of education rather than education itself. The masses are now 
being trained but we should see to it that the children receive the 
proper influences. 

We realize the plastic nature of the mind of the youth — it is a 
piece of blank white paper upon which must be written a record. 
An impression upon this individual is easily made. What the men 
of tomorrow will be is determined by what sort of a report is re- 
corded upon this record blank. Oh! that the teaching force of 
North Carolina Could seriously realize this important truth. The 
teachers and educational forces of the state hold the future of the 
ut&te and we can go forward no further than we raise the standard 
and efficiency of our institutions of learning. Then the questiofi 
naturally arises, what type of education is essential for the higher 
and more important development in the human mind and the answer 
eomes ringing back with increased momentum and force, the edu- 



126 



FORTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 



tion patterned after that which was instituted by Christ himself 
and he himself was the teacher. Our schools should be as nearly 
as possible like the temple of old. They should not be allowed to 
become the places of merchandise and the atmosphere should be 
permeated with the spirit of the Christ hijnself. The teachers, like 
the one great teacher, should be endowed with knowledge, love and 
sympathy and the burning desire to be of the greatest service to 
i:;ankind. They should always be about doing good. Now^ as best 
I can understand, Chowan College has in the past, been that type of 
college. The history of her illustrious alumnae reveals to us, who 
have known little of her influence, the tremendous good that she has 
l^een to this section of the state. One has only to look around to see 
living examples of the profound impression this great college has 
made upon the mind of eastern North Carolina. Par and wide its 
influence has been felt. The principles taught by the faculties of 
this institution have i^assed far beyond the confines of this state and 
nation and methinks 1 can hear a voice from some far off foreign 
field in tones of love, telling me of the wonderful achievements that 
God has wrought there with Chowan alumnae as his human instru- 
ment. 

The splendid Christian atmosphere there is unsurpassed anywhere 
possibly and it is that one thing upon which all enduring structures 
are built. Christian teachers, loyal and true, working in a locality 
with such a sentiment as described above, have wonderful oppor- 
ti-nities to impress upon the minds of those young girls teachings 
and principles that will endure and cause Heaven and earth to he 
drav^^n closer together. 

Chowan College is taking on new life. She is being better equip- 
ped, her buildings and rooms are being made more comfortable. 
From a physical point of view she is really taking on the appearance 
cf a real college. Her faculty is more consecrated and serious than 
ever before. The spirit of earnestness is pervading the campus, but 
T am here to say that with all these fine attributes, Chowan cannot 
function as is becoming her illustrious achievements unless she has 
the full sympathy, love and interest of her thousand daughters and 
numberless friends. Her daughters will be true — no one can deny 
that — then it falls to the lot of her many friends to rally to her 
support. Give her of your means, your prayers and your hearty 
cooperation. In behalf of President Vann, the teachers, the alum- 
nae, I call upon you today to talk Chowan, think Chowan and pray 
and work for Chowan and let her past he only an incentive to 
higher and nobler work. Let us hope and strive to make of Chowan 
a Christian college in name and in truth and In scholarship and in- 
fluence second to none in North Carolina. With Christ as example 
vnd his principles underlying our thought we can attain the goal. 

W. D. BARBIEE. 



W^EST CHOWAN ASS'OCIATION. 



27 



Tvep<jrt on ather eollegeri and scluxrls read by fJobn F. ('ale: 
REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION. 

In addition to Chowan College, in our own Association, we haA^e 
in our Baptist school system in the State sixteen other schools. 

Fourteen of the sixteen are high schools. Nine of the fourteen 
Dre mountain schools controlled by our Home Mission Board, These 
fifteen high schools represent a property valuation of $788,500, with 
$26,800 endowment, making a total valuation of $815,300. These 
schools enrolled last year more than 3,000 pupils. 

Two of ouii seventeen other schools are colleges — Wake Forest 
for young men and Meredith for young women. These schools 
represent a property valuation of $714,000, with $1,068,000 endow- 
ment, making a total valuation of $1,782,000. 

The fall session at Wake Forest opened pleasantly and hopefully. 
The enrollment to date is 506. Counting the S'ummer School stu- 
dents the total enrollment for the year will be considerably in ad- 
vance of that of any previous year. Dr. J. R. Sampey has been en- 
gaged to hold a special revival meeting in the College, beginning 
Sunday, October 29. 

Meredith has had the greatest opening ever. The total enroll- 
ment in the College proper is 417. The enrollment in the elemen- 
tary music department is 131, making a grand total of 548. The 
Faculty including officers and teachers, now number 48. Fifteen 
of the students are planning to give their lives to foreign mission 
work. Last December Meredith College was admitted to full mem- 
bership in the Southern Association of Colleges.. The Trustees have 
voted to move the College to larger quarters as soon as arrange- 
ments can be made for it. The 130 acres of land selected as the 
new site will give ample grounds for the development of our building 
program through all the years to come. 

There are four things we must do for our schools: (1) Patronize 
them; (2) Equip them; (3) Endow them; (4) Hold them to denomi- 
rational alignment. JOHN F. CALE, 

For Committee. 

L. E. Dailey read report, on Ministerial Edneation : 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL EDUCATION. 

There never was an age when preachers needed to be educated 
more than now. If the task a man has to do should determine his 
equipment the preacher should have an education equal to any 
man, for no heavier task was ever placed upon man to carry than 
that placed upon preachers. They are the leaders in the fight 
against sin. They are the Standard bearers for the Cross of Christ. 
The devil is a determined and mighty foe. He is still going up and 
down the earth seeking whom he may devour. To contend against 



FORTIETH ANNUAL SE5SSION 



him on every hand for the purpose of including the world to enthrone 
Jesus Christ as King is a task whichl taxes the ability of preachers 
to the utmost . In order to reach the highest point of efficiency in 
this task preachers must have their powers of heart and mind de- 
veloped to their fullest extent. 

As wd study the history of Christianity we find that God has put 
men to the forefront in his kingdom who were best qualified for the 
task, Moses, Isaiah, Daniel and Paul were wonderful giants in both 
mind and heart. Each one of these men had opportunities for intel- 
lectual development equal to any of their contemporaries. Hence, 
all must conclude that a trained ministry meets with the approval 
of God. 

Our complex life is taxing the ability of ministers as never before. 
New and multiplied duties are being placed upon them by our church 
es and the communities in which they live. In order for them to 
solve these various and varied problems they must receive the 
greatest possible preparation. The great mass of humanity is be- 
coming more and more educated.. The equipment of the preacher 
should never be ibelow that of his congregation, but always above 
if possible. For unless the shepherd has a bountiful supply of food 
bis hungry sheep will look up and not be fed. 

The great campaign of Southern Baptists recognized the need of 
an educated ministry. A great effort was made to call out the called 
and impress upon them the necessity of making adequate prepara- 
tion. They responded by the thousands. We now have 2,400 young 
ministers in high schools, colleges and seminaries. Seventy-five of 
these are at Wake Forest College and North Carolina has 50 youn^ 
ministers at our Seminary at Louisville, getting ready to fill their 
places in the great Kingdom of God. 

We must never forget the plea of the Master to pray that the 
Lord of the harvest send forth laborers in his field for the harvest 
i» white. When they respond we should see to it that not even one 
lacks an opportunity to prepare for tbe task which calls for our best. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. E., DAILY, 
For the Committee. 

On motion to adopt remarks were made by J. F. Cale, Misft. 
Eunice McDowell, P. S. Vann and J. A. McMillan. Eeport 
adopted. 

Walter Daniels, of Wilson, was recognized as a visitor of 
the Roanoke Association 

Tntrodnotoi-y report read by E. N. Gardner as follows: 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN SOCIAL SMlVIOfBI. 

It has been well said that "the ideal of the Kingdom of God in a 
perfect life in a perfect society". That the relation of this ideal bm 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



29 



liot yet been attained is sufficient reason for a discussion of certain 
problems connected with our Lord's Kingdom on earth. The Church 
of Christ stands as His favored, appointed institution for bringing 
the world into an attainment of these objectives; and since the close 
of the world war more so than ever before does the signal call of 
Jehovah ring forth for the Church to aid mightily in the building 
of a social order that will represent the principles for which the 
Master labored and died. 

1. The teachings of Christianity are binding* in personal and do- 
mestic conduct. Churches receive into their memberships people 
yfho have never grasped the significance of a rebirth in their per- 
sonal conduct, and who may demonstrate the attitude of beasts 
at home. The rights of the child to be trained for greatest effi- 
ciency, for its protection against child-labor, and the best education 
that can be provided^ are! factors for which the Church is called to 
stand. The single standard for men and women must continue to 
he proclaimed from the pulpits of our country. 

2. Likewise in social relations there is an insistence that the 
Church speak out. It should stand for the equal rights of men and 
women; the administration of justice to representatives of other 
races, and particularly in the Southland for friendship towards and 
cooperation with the Negro ; and the infusion of Christian principles 
in the industrial activity of the country. The granting of a living 
minimum wage to all employees, the security of employment and 
provision for wholesome working conditions, should be set forth 
along with the inviolability of contract, the obligation upon an 
individual to give the best service for the wage received, and the 
conception of industry not as selfish competition, but as social ser- 
vice rendered humanity, thus emphasizing the teaching of our Lord 
that "All things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, 
do ye even so to them, for this is the law and the prophets." 
(Matt. 7:12.) 

3. As in personal and social relations, so in governmental there 
is need for the voice of the Church to proclaim with a note of as- 
surance the need for the application of the teachings of Christianity. 
The policies of state and national governments should be separated 
from ecclesiastical judisdiction, but should at the same time seek 
to form a glorious, permanent history through the following of 
Christian principles. It is also the duty of the Church to be instru- 
mental in creating an international mind and conscience, which 
shall determine differences by means other than war, which shall 
protect the rights of the smaller nations, which shall proclaim the 
democratic principle of representation of all countries in some 
league of nations or association of states. 

Such is the business of the Church in an unredeemed social order. 
VoY the interpreting of Christian principles, showing men how to 
create a moral fabric in society, it should earnestly put forth its 



30 



FORTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 



efforts. More details of this program will be set forth in the re- 
ports which follow. 

E. N. GARDNER, 
Chairman Committee on Christian Social Service. 

Orphanage report read by W. II. Hollowell : 
REPORT ON ORPHANGE. 

There is no cord in the human heart more acc'essable among our 
people as a whole than that which responds to the cry of an orphan 
child. It was the cry of an innocent babe that melted the heart of 
a heathen Princess. 

I am happy to believe that not since our Lord glorified childhood 
has the cry of a child been heard with more pity and sympathy than 
it is today. The fact that the child is here, not at will but with life 
thrust upon it, impells us to acknowledge its rights and heed its 
cry for a chance. We rejoice that the challenge has been heard 
and as an evidence of this fact more than 2,000 children have been 
and some of which are now the beneficiaries of our own institution 
which is dedicated to God for the glory of childhood., 

Lest we should stop to congratulate ourselves upon our past 
achievements or fail to measure up to the standards of the past, 
let us turn our faces to the future and strive to measure up to our 
present pressing needs. It is not so flattering when we remind our- 
selves of the fact that out of 611 applications for admittance during 
the past year only 67 could be admitted. Too, we have fallen be- 
hind in our current fund, compared with, last year, about eleven 
thousand dollars. Yet again^ because of the crowded conditions 
we are badly in need of at least two more cottages, one for girls 
at each of the two homes. 

We are glad to report that the health record for the past year has 
been good but grieved to report the death of one boy who was al- 
most instantly killed by being thrown from a mule. We are also 
pleased with the fine success which marks thus far the wisdom of 
the new feature of our work — namely, the helping of mothers with 
their fatherless children at home. There are twenty-three mothers 
with a total of one hundred and five children being assisted at this 
time with a total cost of $5.88 each per month. We commend this 
phase of our work for two reasons; it enables the mother to keep 
her children at home with her where they can have motherly atten- 
tion; and the expense per child per month is less than one-third 
of the cost of keeping a child at the Orphanage. 

Finally, I am sure that I voice the sentiment, not only of our 
association or State but the brotherhood throughout many states, 
when I say that we are profoundly grateful that our dear Bi-other 
Johnson, the editor of Charity and Children, is slowly but gradually 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



31 



regaining his health. The Charity and Children has never been 
better and is still operating at a good profit. 

Your committee would recommend: 

1. That every Sunday School take a club of Cbarity and Chil- 
dren in sufficient number to place a copy in each home in the Sun- 
day School, and that we urge our people to read it. 

2, That each Sunday-school designate, if tliey are not already 
so doing, one Sunday in each month as Orphanage Sunday on which 
Sunday an offering shall be taken for the Orphanage. 

3.. That we begin now to plan for a great thank offering for the 
Orphanage to be taken on or about Thanksgiving that greater things 
may be made possible for the destitute children of our great de- 
nomination of this State in the near future. 

W. H. HOLLOWELL, 

For~ Committee. 

Jeese Ijlalock ];res(qite(] the re])()rt on Law Eiiforcenieiit as 
follows : 

REPORT ON LAW ENFOROSMENT. 

Ours is a democratic republic. The government is of the people, 
by the people, and foi*; the people. Laws are enacted by the repre- 
sentatives of the people in response to the will of the people. They 
are to be enforced by constituted authority acting as sworn servants 
of the people. The constituted authorities need and must have the 
support of a wholesome public sentiment in the performance of their 
difficult task. There can be no healthful, permanent enforcement of 
the law except through the regular constituted officials. Anything 
which absolves officials from their obligations, or relieves the peo- 
ple of thei responsibility for the election of faithful officials will 
hinder and not help law enforcement. 

Law enforcement is local in character. This is true because the 
officials and the courts are local. It is also true because the public 
sentiment that supplies the evidence and applies the law to any 
given case is local. The moral forces of a community determine 
to what extent the laws of the community are to be obeyed." The 
standing of your community on the question of law enforcement 
does not depend so much on the kind of paper that you drop into 
the ballot-box as upon the kind of man you drop from your room 
into the street every morning." The only' hope for any community 
where lawlessness abounds is to agitate, educate and create in our 
churches and among our citizens a desire and determination to 
blot out the digrace that we have allowed to come upon us. 

The many lynchings in the South have brought reproach upon its 
fair name. While the best citizens of our country have deplored 
these lynchings and have expressed their disapproval, we have not 
expressed ourselves in terms strong enough to materially lessen tha 



FORTIETH ANNUAL. SESSION 



evil. The man or body of men who take the law into their own 
hands and defy the regularly constituted authorities are no bettei* 
than those guilty of the crime which they seek to punish. Under 
the principles of the American Government every man charged with 
crime is guaranteed a fair trial, in open court, by a jury of his peers 
who shall weigh the evidence and render their verdict accordingly. 
Any other procedure is mob rule and, if adopted, generally, will 
ultimately lead to anarchy and to the overthrow of everything we 
hold dear. 

It is a matter for continued and fervent thanksgiving that in this 
day of unrest and disorder we do not have to contend with legalized 
liquor traffic, which was the most blighting and destructive institu- 
tion known to man. But one of the greatest evils that threatens 
us today is a disregard for the prohibition laws of our state and 
nation. There is prevalent a disregard for these laws that threatens 
the very foundation of our government. The blockader, the boot- 
legger and the monkey-rum soak are openly defying the righteous 
laws of our state and nation. There are more than thirty liquor 
organzations challenging the right of a self-governing people to en- 
force their laws. These organizations are banded together to de- 
stroy respect for the law and bring about its repeal so that they 
m&y go on in their work of destruction unmolested. 

We have preached against the blockader and the bootlegger And 
we have preached well. We have prayed and we have prayed with 
fervor. We have written against them and there has been logic in 
our sentences. But the time has come when we must do more. 
Our sermons, our prayers, and our arguments must crystalize into 
action and every loyal citizen must help enforce the law by loyally 
supporting the officials, by being ready to secure and give evidence 
against the lawbreaker and seeing that he is made to pay the pen- 
alty for his crime. 

In closing our report we would urge upon every Christian and 
citizen the necessity of helping to create in his community a healthy 
sentiment in favor of enforcing the laws, wliether they be against 
lynching, the illegal liquor traffic, S'abbath desecration, indecent 
dancing or any other evil that threatens us. 

The following recommendations are submitted for the approval 
of the Association: 

1. That we, the delegates and members of the West Chowan As- 
sociation, in session assembled, put ourselves on record as opposed 
to any modification of the Voltead Act which will permit the sale of 
light wines and beer. 

2. That we petition our representatives and senators in congress 
to support the Sterling amendment to the tariff, which will give us 
protection from the international rum runners for eighteen miles 
instead of three. 

Z. That we petition our legislature to enact some legislation that 



WEST CHOWAN ASS'OCIATION. 



38 



^ill harmonize our state laws with the Volstead Act and that will 
irive to the Attorney-General of the State authority to enforce these 
laws in any part of the state. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JESSE' BLALOCK, 

For Committee. 

Reix)rt on Ministerial Relief wae^ read by J. T. Bolton : 
REPORT ON MINISTERS RELIEF. 

This department of our work has made substantial gains in the 
past three and a half years. The Southern Baptist Conventions re- 
port shows invested assets, of $419,027.25 it has paid to its old and 
retired preachers $300,173.31 or at the rate of $100,057.77 as an aver- 
age per year for the past three years. The Board paid out during 
aie past year to her relief beneficiaries the sum of $128,966.89 which 
is $10,000 in excess of what we paid them last year. 

The Board has now a beneficiary list of between eight and nine 
kundred. Others are being added from month to month. While we 
have made great strides since the organization of the new Con- 
vention Board in giving aid and comfort to the disabled and retired 
ministers, we are just beginning to do what we should do. 

We have just begun to touch the fringe of our responsibility. The 
Beed among Southern Baptists is very great. We have thousands of 
Fsstors in our Southern Baptist ministry. A few of these may com- 
mand salaries which make them independent of any phase of min- 
i*terial relief, but the majority cannot possibly save up a modest 
competency for the inevitable day of retirement. 

There are hundreds and hundreds of these men now, whose minds 
are always troubled, and who know no such thing as freedom from 
Titorry and anxiety about the future; old couples drawing near the 
evening of life with barely enough to provide the commonest ne<7es- 
sities of life, and without any of its luxuries. 

The general relief side of our work must ever be its greatest de- 
partment. It is in this department we make provision for min- 
isters who, for one reason or another, can never become members 
of the Annuity Fund, and this provision must be large and ample. 

It is in this department that we deal with widows and the or- 
phan children of deceased ministers. This relief income should by 
and by be made absolute for every minister who has behind him 
an honorable and faithful life. 

That day, however, cannot come until we have gathered millions 
t\)f an endowment fund. Respectfully submitted, 

J. T. BOLTON, Committee. 



FORTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 



S. B. Barnes road report on ITotrjpitals as follows: 
REPORT ON HOSPITALS. 

When our Lord sent Hisi twelve disciples out, He told them to 
heal the sick. This they were not to overlook. As we think of our 
duty in ministering to the wants and necessities of suffering human- 
ity, we feel sure our Lord would have us to do what we can to re- 
li(:ve suffering humanity today. 

It is gratifying to note the interest that Southern Baptists are 
taking in the work of ministering to the bodily ills of the suffering 
in our bounds. 

The work of the hospital is not confined to church members only, 
but to suffering humanity regardless of his belief. 

New Hospitals in Operation and in Prospect. 

Since the meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention a year 
ago, two new hospitals have been opened in Alabama. The first is 
a 150-^bed hospital in the City of Birmingham, purchased by the 
Birmingham Association for $245,000. The superintendent is J. 
M. Long. The second is an 88-bed hospital at Salem. The value of 
the property is $263,000 and Louis J. Biristow! is the superintendent. 
This latter institution is owned by the State Convention of Alabama. 

Another new intitution is the Little Rock Hospital at Little Rock, 
Arkansas. This hospital is already in operation, but important and 
extensive expansion is' under way. 

A new hospital has also been purchased by the Baptist of Tarrant 
County, Texas. This institution is located at Fort Worth, and is 
onei of the best appointed hospitals in the entire South. It was re- 
cently taken over by the Baptists of the Tarrant County Association 
at a cost of $250,000. 

Other institutions in contemplation are the Kentucky Baptist Hos- 
pital in Louisville; and a hospital at Winston-S'alem. N. C. 

Florida Baptists are hoping to get a hospital also. 



Total number of hospitals in operation in the south 19 

Number of Hospital Buildings. 61 

Total Number of Patients 41,000 

Number of Charity Patients 3^,100 

Value of service rendered by these hospitals to Charity 

patients $219,233.7^ 



Comparative Statement of Denominational Hospitals in the South. 

The number of hospitals within the bounds of the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention maintained by the various denominations is as 
follows: 



Seventh Day Adventists 
Presbyterians 



2 
3 



WRST CHOWAN AiSS'OCIATlON. 



35 



Methodist 

Baptists 1^ 

Catholics '^^ 

Thus it will be seen, that though the Catliolics are smallest in 
numbers, they have nearly three times as many hospitals as all the 
evangelical denominations combined. 

They surely are showing their wisdom along the line of looking 
after the sick and suffering in their reach. 

It is to be hoped that the Baptists of the South land will do all 
in their power to minister to the bodily ills of the suffering of our 
land, while looking after the spiritual needs of humanity. 

We pray God's blessings on the work that lies before us, in the 
bounds of our Convention. S. B , BARN'ES, Committee. 



Keport on Ixelatioii of the Church to the Hoiiie, |)i'epared by 
Dr. W. Mitchell, \Nas read by E. X. Gardner. 

THE CHURCH'S' RELATION TO THE HOME, DIVORCE, SAB- 
BATH E1ESECRATI0N. 

Many difficult and baffling problems confront the Churches of 
Jesus Christ in these days of unrest and strife. Perhaps the most 
pressing of these problems is the presentation of the Christian 
home. This is imperative. It underlies all our problems and its 
solution will go far tovv'ards removing them. 

The Christian Home is one of the world's greatest needs. More 
depends upon it than any other institution we have. The moral 
and religious training of children is all important. No institution 
yet devised can supplant the home in this work. We look to the 
Christian home for our ministers, missionaries, educators, Church 
workers and religious bodies. The Christian homes of America 
have been the native's greatest asset in furnishing men with 
strength and character for public service, and they are largely re- 
sponsible for our country's marvelous growth and development. They 
are a fertile soil for the growth of Governors, President's: Cabinet, 
Ministers, etc., and they are today the strongest bulwark we have 
against the many perils that threaten our National existence It 
is then, a matter of supreme importance, that the home' life of our 
people be kept pure and clean, and that it be dominated by the re- 
ligion of .Jesus Christ. 

Many years ago there was a plain, obscure home in Nazareth, 
which we might study with profit., It was a home of modest means, 
enjoying none of the luxuries of life, and knew nothing of modern 
comforts and conveniences. It commanded neither political influ- 
ence nor social prestige, but it gave to the world its greatest gift— 
"The Man of! Galilee." 

Mary, the mother of our Lord, was a devout, Consecrated woman. 



FORTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 



She ruled her hjousehold with love, taught her children the Scrip- 
tures and parental obedience, and trained them in habits of industry 
-and economy. Is the Christian home, in which God is honored, and 
the Cardinal virtues, modesty, purity, chastity and honor lived, 
safe; or is it being gradually destroyed by the fast living of today? 

There are many perils wliich threaten the home and the life of 
the nation. "The Crime Wave," which has swept over the country 
for several years, is unabated. Lawlessness and immorality are 
constantly increasing, due largely to idleness and lack of parental 
discipline in the home. The modern dance, the "Movies," pleasure 
resorts and all sorts of questionable amusements are tending to de- 
stroy the home life. 

However, I wish to call your attention to two evils which seriously 
threaten the home, the Church and the Nation. The first of these 
is the Divorce evil. Statistics published by the Federal Government, 
ishow that the number of divorces, granted by our courts, is in- 
creasing each year at an alarming rate. This is striking at the very 
foundation of our civilization. The family is the smallest subdivis- 
ion of organized society, and family life is the mainstay of this re- 
public. Whatever destroyes the home strikes the Church and the 
Nation at a vital point. The perpetuity of the home depends upon 
the permanence of the marriage relations. If our Churches would 
save themselves from disaster, they must cultivate and preserve 
the family life, and thus turn back the tide which is destroying the 
American home. 

The second evil to which I wish to call attention is Sabbath Dese- 
cration.. This, like the other social evils, was given great impetus 
hy the world war, and disregard for the Sabbath is constantly in- 
creasing. The tendency of the times is to destroy the Christian 
Sabbath, as a day of rest and worship, and establish here in America 
the Continental Sabbath. Nothing could be more hurtful to the 
leligious and home life of our people. 

When we carefully consider the dangers that confront us, we 
cannot escape the Conclusion, that one of the most inviting and 
fruitful fields for our Churches is the careful cultivation of the fam 
ily life and the growing of true Christian homes. It is the biggest 
task before them and promises to yield the finest results. It is 
foundation work. If any Churches can safeguard the old time 
Christian home where God's word is faithfully studied and dili- 
gently taught, where children receive wholesome lessons in industry, 
obedience and iSabbath obedience; then the future of the home, 
the S'tate and the Nation is secure. The Churches must get in 
close touch with the home makers, and see that the home life is 
permeated with the Spirit of Christianity. They must evangelize 
the individual and develop the whole family, using every agency 
they have, the pulpit, the printed page, Sunday School, B. Y. P. U., 
W. M. S., i)astoral work, personal service, etc. 



WE)ST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



3T 



The Gospel must be faithfully preached and consistently lived, 
if we are to check the decay of home training and discipline. Pastors 
are urged to preach often on these evils which threaten Society, 
to teach their people the sanctity and solemnity of marriage, and 
ccnstantly keep before them the baneful effects of divorce and Sab - 
bath desecration. Many hasty and ill-considered marriages might 
be thus avoided. We should also seek to obtain better legislation 
on these subjects. Our laws relating to divorce need to be greatly 
Btrengthened, and made to conform to the teaching of the Bible. 

We need especially, to enforce the existing laws concerning the 
Sabbath, and have passed such other acts as may be needed to pre- 
serve the Christian Sabbath as a day of rest, quiet and worship. 
But let us remember that the Gospel is the strongest weapon the 
Church can use. W. MITCHELL. 

Moved to adopt. Adjourned. Bene<licti(m by W. II. ITo]- 
^owell. 



AFT EimOON SESS 10^. 
Prayer by J. P. Essex. 

The following visiting brethren wei*e recognized : Rev. C. 
T. Taylor, of Emporia, Va., Rev. Wm. Towner, of Garysbnrs-, 
Rev. A. G. Carter, of Rosemaiy. 

L. E. Dailey made a statement abont help to yonng min- 
isterial students. On motion further help to tiiese young imm 
was discontinued. 

J. W. Whitley for committee offered the following chang^^ 
in constitution which was adopted. 

ARTICLE 16. 

On the first day of the session of the Assocfiation a committee of 
three, one from each county, shall be named by the Moderator to 
nominated the EJxecutive Committee for the ensuing year which 
shall consist of twelve members, the Moderator, the Vice-Modera- 
tor, the Clerk and at least one woman from each of the three coun- 
ties of the Association. 

J. W. WHITLEIY, 
J. W. DOWNEY, 
L. B. DAILEY. 

The same committee also nominated the following Exeo«- 
tive Committee who were elected : 



f 



FORTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Dr. C, G. Powell, W. D. Barbee, R. B. Lineberry, H. G. Bryant, P. 
M. Fleetwood, J. H. Matthews, N. W. Britton, J. T. Bolton, J. J. Tay- 
lor, Mrs. E. B. Vaiighan, Miss Una White, Mrs. Herbert Jenkins. 

The following resolution of thanks offered by P. S. Vann 
Avas ado])te(l ])y rising vote. 

We tender our appreciation and love to Elam Church and com- 
munity for Christian graces manifested toward us and the bounti- 
ful, well-prepared food supply spread for our comfort, during this 
session of our Association. 

(Joniniittce ow Tiine, Place and i^reacher report as follows: 

Your Committee on Time, Place and Preacher beg leave to sub- 
mit the following report: 

Time: Tuesday after 4th Sunday in October, 1923. 
Place: Murfreesboro. 
Preacher: Rev. J. P. Essex. 

J. H. MATTHEWS', 
H. G, BRYANT, 
J. G.. STANCILL. 

Re])ort adopted. 

Ooniniitt(^-e <ai Xoniinations make the following report 
which was ado]>ted : 

REPORT OF NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

Representative Home Missions — E. N. Gardener. 
Foreign Missions — R. B. Lineberry. 
State Missions — H. G. Bryant. 

Delegate Southern Raytist Convention — V. E, Duncan. 

Delegate to S'tate Convention — E. .1.^ Isenhower. 

J. W. DOWNEY, 
GEORGE D. LEGGETT, 
S. H. WINBORNE, 

Committee. 

Moderator apjxnnted the following standing committees: 
STANDING COMMlTTEtES. 

Report on Missions — E J, Isenhower, Jesse Blalock, Miss Una 
^hite. 

Report on Social Service — L. E. Dailey, S. F. Bristow, W. H. 
Hollowell. 

Report on Education — J. W. Whitley, Miss Eunice McDowell, V. 
E. Duncan. 



W^ST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



39 



Moved and carried that Ali^s Eunice^ McDowell be asked 
lo have her address l>efore the Association published in tract 
form, association to hear expense of same. A collection of 
.^■24.46 was taken to meet this expense and supplement min- 
ute fund. Finance ('ommittee report $168 received for min- 
utes. 

Treasurer's report was I'ead as follows: 
TREASURER'S REPORT. 
West Chowan Association in account with W. A. Thomas, Treasurer. 



Oct. 26, 1921— Balance on hand $ -01 

Oct. 28, 1921 — Received from Finance Committee 196.58 

Total ? 196.59 

Credits. 

Dec. 14, 1921— Eynum Printing Co.. (Minutes) $ 193.75 

Dec. 14, 1921 — R. B. Lineberry, service as Clerk 2.84 

Total •$ 196.. 59 



Respectfully submitted, 

W. A. THOMAS, Treasurer. 

Order of Business adoj^ted in same general form of last 
\Qi\r. 

J. IT. Matthews spoke on the T.i-^Fillion. Keport on Social 
Ser\nce adopted. 

iristorian's rq)ort read as follows: 

HISTORIAN'S REPORT. 

Your Historian begs leave to report as follows: 
The most hopeful evidence of bigger things and better things for 
the Kingdom in the future is the substantial progress made ija 

Young People's Work. 

Numbers of Royal Ambassadors, Girls' Auxiliary and Sunbeam 
organizations have been created during the year. Many organized 
classes and B. Y. P. U's have been reported to your Historian. Six 
churches report Standard Sunday Schools. Several churches report 
Standard Unions. Quite a number of churches have had Training 
Classes in Sunday-school and B. Y. P. U. work. Our young people 
are being utilized as never before. 

We had encouraging reports from our churches during the 

Revival S«ason. 

Nearly all of our churches reported good meetings. God was 
present in power. He wrought mightily through His S'pirit, quick- 



40 



FORTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 



ening and deepening the spiritual life of believers and regenerating 
and saving the lost. For weeks the Lord was daily adding to the 
churches the saved. 

We note some v 

Pastoral Changes. 

Pastor F. B. Raymond has resigned the Aulander field; we ar« 
not advised as to his plans. 

Pastor T, L. Brown has left our ranks and joined the forces of 
the ChoM'^an Association. 

Pastor A. P. Mustian has also left us; he has taken work at 
Ocean View, Va. 

Pastor A. Miller has left the Association. 

Pastor 9. B. Barnes is succeeded at Siloam by Pastor George D. 
Leggett. 

Pastor Fred T. Collins has left the Association within the year. 

Pastor W. H. Hollowell is shepherding the fiock at Lewiston in 
connection with his work at Kelford. 

John F. Cale has given up the work at Holly Grove and Askew- 
Tille; he is now at Connaritsa for two Sundays. 

Within the yeai we have imported several 

New Pastors. 

Bro. A, E. C. Pittman has accepted the pastoral care of Republi- 
can, Holly Grove and Askewville. 

Bro. E. J. Isenhower is located in Ahoskie and is shepherding 
Ahoskie and Farley's. 

Bro. J. P. Essex is located in Jackson and has the pastoral care 
oi Jackson and Mount Carmel. 

Bro. J. Fred Stimson has the pastoral care of the churches com- 
posintg the Winton field. 

Bro. R. R. Lanier is located in Seaboard and is shepherding Sea- 
board, Elam and Bethel. 

These brethren are happy in the work and are proving vaJuabl* 
importations. We extend to them the hand of welcome and fellow- 
sliip. 

Despite the financial depression many of our churches hare 
♦aught the 

Building Spirit. 

The Siloam brethren have just spent around $500 in improviai 
and beautifying their house of worship. 

Ashley Grove Church is greatly improving her house of worshiiu 
hj adding Sunday-school rooms. 

Woodland Church has just completed Sunday-school rooms. 

The Ladies Aid S'ociety has just spent around $400 to make tii« 
Pastorium more comfortable for Pastor Blalock. 

We congratulate the Green's Cross saints. They hare compiet*4 



WEST CHOWAN ASS'OCIATION. 



41 



.a splendid new houpe that will meet the demands of. that growing 
^ork. 

We are proud of Bethany. Under the leadership of Pastor Geo. 
D. I^ggett this good church has completed a $7,000 house of wor- 
s^hip . 

Jackson Church has recfently spent |1,000 in making repairs on 
Pastor's Home and added $500 to pastor's salary. 

The Seaboard Field^eaboard, Elam, and Bethel — are building 
&t Seaboard a new, eight-room brick Pastoriurr to cost arount 
:$8,000. 

The Murfreesboro Church is erecting a new building which will 
cost when completed around $35,000. Within the year this church 
bas erected a new, up-to-date Pastor's Home at a cost of more 
than $7,000. W3 offer congratulations. 

Death having thinned our r inks during the year some space must 
be given to 

Necrology. 

Menola Church has greatly lost in the home going of Bro.. J. R. 
Catling and Sister Delia Griffith. 

In the death of Sister S. E. Everette Murfreesboro Church loses 
one of the most devoted and consecrated members this church ever 
had. Sister Everette spent many useful years in His service. For 
more than 30 years she was a teacher In the Sunday-school. 

At Conaritsa we have lost in the death of Brethren Frank Howard 
and Bose Tayloe and Sisters .... Early, Bertha Howard and Mollie 
Howard. 

Jackson has lost by death S'ister Mary E. Hardy and Bro. John 
C Deloatch. 

Death has taken from Pleasant Grove Bro. Joseph Rawls and 
Sisters Ida Hall, Virginia Baugham, Sallie and Eleanor Rawls. 

Mount Carmel has lost in the death of Sister Mary E. Hasty. 

Lewiston lost two devoted members in the homegoing of Brethren 
I^enjamin Parker and W. J. Earley. 

Our entire brotherhood loses in the death of Hon., C. W. Mitchell, 
df Aulander. Bro. Mitchell was one of the most useful laymen in 
■our ranks. For years he figured conspicuously and successfully in 
the affairs of both church and State. 

Elder T. T. Speight has fallen on sleep. For many years he was 
a prominent and successful pastor in our Association. In the num- 
ber of people he baptized, married and buried he has been surpassed 
perhaps by no pastor who ever wrought in our Association. He was 
literally known by everybody and loved by all. He did a monu- 
mental work. 

Rich Square lost Everett Vaughan and Mrs. Mary Ann HoUeman. 
Pine Forest loses in the death of John R. Carstarphen 



42 



FORTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 



By order of this body a word must be said about 
Elam Church. 

Elam Church was at first Vasser's Meeting House. During this; 
period the church was pastored by two men — William Hardy and' 
James Delk. In 1844 this church was recognized as Elam Church.. 
The following brethren have served as pastor of this church — T. W. 
Babb, J. B. Boone, John P. Lee, Vernon lanson, P. T. Warren, W. C. 
Durham, H, T. Williams, M. L. Green, D. Gale, J. R. Taylor, Alexan- 
der Speight, K. D. Stukenbrok, Alexander Miller, R. R. Lanier. This 
church has had two houses of worship — the one originally built and 
the present splendid structure in which the present session of this 
body is being held, 

JOHN F. GALE, Historian. 
A(ljoiiri]ed. Renedietioii by J. W. Whitley. 

Dr. C. G. Powell. ]\Ioderator.. 
]J. B. LiNKBKJiRY, Clerk. 



RECEIVED FOR MINUTES: 

Ahoskie, $6.00; Ashleys Grove, $2.00; Askewville, $3.00; Aulander, 
$5.00; Bethany, $3.00; Bethel, $2.00; Bethlehem, $3.50; Brantley's 
Grove, $2.00; Buckhorne, $4'.00; Capeharts, $3.00; Cashie, $6.00; 
Center Grove, $4.00; Christian Harbor, $3.40; Colerain, $5.00; Con- 
naritsa, $5..00; Conway, $2.25; Creeksville, $.2.25; Elam, $6.00; Ga- 
latia, $3.00; Green's X Roads, $3.00; Harrellsville, $3.60; Holly Grove, 
$5.00; Holly Springs, $4.00; Hortons, $2.50; Jackson, $3.00; Kelford, 
$5.00; Lasker, $3.25; Lawrence, $2.00; Lewiston, $5.00; Margaretts- 
ville, $2.00; Mars Hill, $2.60; Meherrin, $7.00; Menola, $3.00; Merry 
Hill, $2.10; Mount Carmel, $2.50; Mount Tabor, $5.00; Murfreesboro, 
$5.00; Oak Grove, $2.00; Pine Forest, $2.50; Pleasant Grove, $4.25; 
Potecasi, $2.00; Powellsville, $3.00; Republican, $10.00; Rich Square, 
$5.00; Riverside, $2.50; Roanoke, $2.00; Roberts Chapel, $3.00; Ross' 
$3.00; Sandy Run, $3.00; Seaboard, $4.00; Severn, $5.00; Siloam, 
$3.00; S't. Johns, $2.50; Union, $3.50; Winton, $2.50;: Woodland, $5.00. 
Total, $202.70. 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE W. M. U.. WEST CHOWAN 
ASSOCIATION. 

The 28tlTj annual session of the W. M. U., of the West Chowan, 
Association met with Ahoskie Church, July 26th, 1922. Miss Una 
White, Superintendent, presiding. After the opening hymn, "How 
Firm a Foundation," Mrs. Ernest Hayes, of Ahoskie, conducted the 
devotional exercises, reading as our scripture lesson some passages 
from Mark and Matthew, using as her subject "Service." 

The Union was then led in prayer by Miss Hayes. 

One often hears of the keynote of a meeting, but the meaning 
of this gathering seems to have been sounded forth in chords of 
love and service which blended to form a complete harmony. 

The first great chord was hospitality and those present will not 
soon forget the freedom with which it was sounded. Many notes 
went into this chord and each one touched a responsive note in our 
appreciation. Warm words of welcome were spoken by Mrs. A. W. 
Green in behalf of the Woman's Missionary Society of Ahoskie. 

Response was given by Mrs., Paul Morris. Hospitable homes were 
opened for the entertainment of the guests and the noonday tables 
groaned under their burdens of good things so bountifully provided 
by the ladies of Ahoskie. 

The successful efforts of Mrs. J. A. Williams, Chairman of hos- 
pitality committee, made and kept all delegates comfortable. 
Roll' Call of W. M. Societies; Y. W. A's; R. A's and Sunbeam. 

After this the Superintendent introduced to the Union Miss Mary 
Warren, Corresponding* Secretary for our State W. M. U., Mrs , Mini 
nie Anderson, who is now a missionary in Peking, China, also Miss 
Horne, from Monroe. 

The second note of the meeting was that of service so well sound- 
ed by Mrs. Hayes in the devotional exercises, also by the willingness 
of the speakers who came a long distance that they might give this 
audience results of greater training and visions of deeper service 
than can be the lot of all, and to wedge still deeper the Missionary 
beliefs and convictions that burn in the heart of every true Baptist. 

One of the most important features of the day was the annual 
report and address of our Superintendent, Miss White. This mes- 
sage will linger in the hearts of those who heard it. Miss White- 
was at her best and the Union is rightly proud of the fact that we 
have such a capable woman steering the W. M. U. of the West 
Chowan, which set sail about 28 years ago. 

Notwithstanding these testing times the spirit of loyalty and co- 
operation among our women has been beautiful and our work con- 
tinues on the upward trend. The financial report shows an increase 
in giving. Amount contributed to all objects $15,802.94. 

For the Johnson Fund the Union has raised $806.18. She has been 
paid $724.58, leaving a balance in bank July 26th, 1922 of $81.60. 

Amount paid in for Associational Expense Fund $134.20. Amount 



44 



FORTIETH ANNUAL. SESSION 



paid out $78.10, showing a balance in bank July 26th, 1922, of $56.10. 
The following number of magazines are taken: 
Home and Foreign Fields 225, Royal Service 223, Biblical Recorder 

523. 

Then came the report of the Y. W.. A. Superintendent. In the 
absence of Mrs. A. L. Lassiter, this report was given' by Mrs. S. N. 
Parker. 

New Y. W A's organized 7, number of organizations in associa- 
tion 19, total amount contributed to all objects $791.96. 

Mrs. W.. R. Haight, of Windsor, Junior S'uperintendent, submitted 
tlie following report: 

Number of Junior Societies 68, members of societies 1126, No. 
churches with Jr. Societies 42, No. without same 17, Sunbeam bands 
42, Royal Ambassador chapters 14, G. A. societies 12, amount given 
by Sunbeams $1,147 19; G. A's $273.98; R. A's $404.41. Total amount 
given by Junior bands $1,825.58. 

The following Junior societies attained all points on the standard 
of excellence: 

Sunbeams, Ahoskie; G. A's, Lewiston and S'evern, W. M. Societies 
attaining all points on the standard of excellence as follows: Mur- 
freesboro, Powellsville and LewistoiL 

Prom the inspiring reports given by the county union presidents, 
we felt that the Lord had wrought marvelous things through our 
feeble efforts. 

Mrs. Dailey's report showed splendid work done by the Berti© 
Xnion. 

They are supporting two Bible women in China, and expect to 
continue their scholarship to the Training School. Miss Ella Pierce, 
■of Ahoskie, having again accepted the scholarship. 

Mr^. C. C. Hoggard gave a report of the work being done in Hert- 
ford county. Churches organized as never before for more efficient 
service. More mission stiidy classes than in any previous year. 
Miss Valerea Green still on the Foreign field, supported by a woman 
of Hertford County, Miss Ursa Vinson has again accepted the 
t^ounty Union Scholarship to the Training School. 

Mrs. E. A. Huggins reported a most successful years work done by 
the Northampton County Union. 

Notable progress made in personal service and Mission Study. 
iScholarship from this county goes to Miss Nellie Page, of Morris- 
ville. 

All the above reports were adopted. 

■ What the campaign has done for our Association." wa« very 
forcibly and interestingly discussed by Mrs. J. Herman Barnes, of 
Merry Hill. 

Miss Warren asked that the Union have a prayer for Miss Elsie 
Hunter, who at this time is seriously ill. This prayer was led by 
Mrs. Haight. 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



45. 



Address by Miss Mary Warren, Corresponding Secretary for our 
State W. M. U. brought rest and refreshment to all who feel tliat 
many new and difficult forms of service are calling to women whose 
hands are already so full. She earnestly requested that each so- 
ciety report promptly each quarter to the State Officers. And that 
wo strive to increase the number of subscriptions to "Royal Service " 
and "The Home and Foreign Field." 

Owing to the lateness of the hour the Superintendent of Mission 
Study, Miss Bessie Tayloe, ask that her report be left over for the 
afternoon. 

At this time we were delighted to have Mrs. George Williams, 
of Gatesville, to sing for us. 

After announcements and appointments of committees the morn- 
ing session closed with prayer by Miss Bessie Tayloe. 

AFTERNOON SESSION, 

The afternoon session opened by singing "Work For the Night i? 
Coming." — Mrs. W. R. Haight, presiding. 

Miss Sue Brett, of Winton, conducted devotional exercises, read- 
ing from the 14th chapter of Mark. 

Minutes of the morning session read. 

Pageant — ^"New Europe" was given by the Y. W. A. of Ahoskie, 
conducted by Miss Ella Pierce, a student of the Training School. 
Ill this Pageant they showed us how America is trying to meet the 
needs of war-torn Europe. Each one present felt that we must not 
let the work of giving the gospel to Europe suffer, for the lack of 
funds. Let us pray that God will enlarge the vision of the people 
of the Southland that we may heed the call and give of our time, 
means and self that the gospel may be given to Europe. 

"Christian Education Versus S"tate," was interestingly and well 
discussed by Miss Byrd Souter. The strong points brought out by 
her in this discussion will long be remembered by those who heard 
this timely m.essage. 

Report from Chowan College was given by Mr. P. 3. Vann, Presi- 
dent of the College. 

We were glad to hear of the many improvements in the way of 
equipments, also the many strong additions to the already splendid 
-faculty. 

The following resolutions were read and adopted by the Union: 
To the Hon. State Board of Education: — 

The annual Baptist W^omans Convention in regular session in 
Ahoskie, N. C, July 26, 1922, passed the following resolutions unani- 
mously: 

Whereas, the Convention represents Bertie, Hertford and North- 
ampton Counties, includijig 58 Baptist Churches, with a membership 
of 13,685 members, and 



46 



FORTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 



Whereas we want our young ladies to take their college course 
in Chowan College, and 

Whereas the grade of certificate granted by your Board to the 
graduates of Chowan College is very seriously militating against the 
patronage of the College, and 

Whereas, the teaching force of Chowan College, the Library, 
Society Halls, Records, and Buildings are all competent and equip- 
ped to do grade "A" College work, and 

Whereas, Chowan graduates are filling well and satisfactorily 
many of the positions as teachers and principals in the public 
schools, graded schools and high schools in our State and others. 

Therefore, resolve, 

That, we respectfully ask your Board to take immediate action to 
place Chowan College in class "A" in the issuing of certificates to 
lier graduates. 

Tc the Hon. Baptist State Board of Education: — 

The annual Baptist Woman's Convention in regular session in 
Alioskie, N, C, July 26, 1922, passed the following resolutions: 

Whereas this Convention represents the West Chowan Associa- 
tion with a membership of 13,685. 

Whereas we want our young ladies to take their college course 
in Chowan College, and 

Whereas the grade of certificate granted to Chowan graduates is 
very seriously militating against the patronage of Chowan and 
turning our girls to the two Slate Schools, and 

Whereas, the facility of Chowan is all Baptist, and five of them 
hoid M. A. degrees, and 

Whereas Chowan graduates are filling well and satisfactorily 
many very important positions in Grade and High S'chools and Col- 
leges in this State and others, and 

Whereas we have no thought of antagonizing any Baptist institu- 
tion but we do earnestly desire to have our own girls educated un- 
der Christian influence. 

Therefore, resolved. 

That your Board unite in an immediate effort to request the State 
Board of Education to grant "A" certificates to Chowan College 
graduates. 

The Union was glad to have Miss Stephenson head of the Voice 
Department of Chowan College to sing for us. 

Miss Ella Pierce, a student of the Training School, gave us an 
interesting and strong address on "Saving Our Youth," bringing up 
the possibilities and responsibilities of the youth of our land. Es- 
pecially stressing the training that can only be given in the home, 
Sunday School and the Church. 

Mrs. Herbert Jenkins in a few we]\ chosen words, presented Miss 
Ella Pierce, our Bertie County Training School girl, a Training 
School pin. This pin was awarded by the Union as a manifestation 



WEST CHOWAN ASS^OCTATION. 



47 



«f their appreciation of the faithful service rendered the W. M. 
550cieties of this Association during her summer vacation. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE. 

The report of the Nominating Committee was made by Mrs, R. 
B. Lineberry, as follows: 

We the Nominating Committee ask to submit the following report: 
Noting the faithfulness and efficiency of all your officers, we wish 
to thank them for their helpful service. We are very sorry to accept 
the resignation of Mrs. A. L. l.,assiter as Y. W. A. Superintendent. 
We suggest that this be filled by our Associatlonal Superintendent. 

We wish to recommend for Associational Superintendent — Miss 
Una White. 

Junior Superintendent — Mrs. W. R. Haight. 
Secretary-Treasurer — Miss Mary Pritchard. 
Mission Study Superintendent — ^Miss Bessie Tayloe. 
Chairman Personal Service — Mrs. E. B. Vaughan. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. VAUGHAN, 
MRS. C. C. HOGGARD, 
MRS. R., B. LINEBERRY, 
Committee. 

The report was adopted. 

Mrs. P. S'. Vann was appointed by Miss Wbite as Y. W., A. Sup- 
erintendent. 

The Committee on Time and Place reported as follows: 
The Committee recommends that the Union meet with the so- 
ciety of Woodland Baptist Church for our next annual meeting, 
Wednesday after the fourth Sunday in July, 1923. 

MRS. F. C. JENKINS, 

MRS. B. SYKEiS, 

MRS. BLYTHE, Committee. 

The report was adopted. 

Committee on Obituaries reported as follows: 

Whereas, God in His all-wise providence has seen fit to remove 
from our Missionary work to their Heavenly Home to receive their 
reward: 

Ahoskie — Mrs. Herbert Lassiter. 
Aulander — Mrs. Will Dunning. 
Brantley's Grove — Mrs. Josephine Godwin. 
Cashie — Mrs. Belinda Rice. 
Colerain — Miss Elizabeth Harrell. 
Holly Springs — Mrs. Fannie Piland. 

Mount Tabor— Mrs. Richard Jenkins and Mrs. J. N. Doffermyre. 
Potecasi — Mrs. Mollie Harrell. 

PowellsvilIe~Mrs. J. E. R., Perry and Mrs. T. fiJ. Wiggins. 



48 



FORTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 



Rich Square — Mrs. Mary A. Holloman and Miss Pattie Jenkin-s, 
Republican — Mrs. Ira Dempsey. 

Winton — Mrs. Julian Newsome and Mrs. Thomas D. Boone. 
Be it resolved 

1st. That the W. M., U. of the West Chowan Association ha» 
suffered a keen loss in these members of much value, and we give 
sympathy to the bereaved ones. 

2nd. That we determine to emulate the lives of these christian 
porkers in our Missionary walk ot life. 

3rd. That a copy of these resolutions be placed on the minutes 
of the West Chowan W. M. U., one sent to the Biblical Recorder 
for publication, one to the families of the deceased. 

MRS. S. N. PARKER, 
MRS. a, L. BILYTH'E^ 
MRS. B. A. HUGGINS, 

Committee. 

Minutes of the afternoon session read. 

We were dismissed with prayer by Mrs. P. S. Vann. 

EVENING S'ES'SION. 

The evening session of the West Chowan Association W. M. 
meeting opened in the Ahoskie Baptist Church on Wednesday, .July 
26th, at 8:15 p. m. Rev. E, J. Isenhower, presiding. The congrega- 
tion standing, began the program by singing "Guide Me, O Thou 
Great Jehovah." Reverend R. B. Lineberry then led in prayer; 
and the congregation followed by singing "Jesus Lover of My Soul."' 

The devotional exercises were conducted by Miss Mary Warren. 
Jn this, she stressed our God-given talents, and love for our neigh- 
bor and that everything we have belongs to God, and we must use 
all for His service. 

The offering was then received by four girls. 

The members of the Association were sorry to be deprived of the 
privilege of the expected special music by Miss Claude Stephenson 
who could not be present. 

At this time, we were happy to have with us, Mrs. Anderson, for- 
merly Miss MiddletoD, and our own training school girl, who is 
now a missionary in Pekin, China. Mrs. Anderson delivered an 
intensively interesting and instructive address on her work at the 
language school in Pekin. 

We were then favored by a solo, "All the W£iy My Saviour Leads 
Me," which was beautifully rendered by Mr. Harris. 

After these moments of intermission, Mrs., Anderson returned 
to the platform dressed in native Chinese costume, and continued 
her address on China by presenting many curios of that nation, and 
by explaining something about each one. When she had finished. 



WEST CHOWAN ASS-QCIATION. 



49 



«l;e asked every one to stand and join her in singing the Chinese' 
favorite song, "Jesus Loves Me This I Know." 

The following report from the resolutions committee was adopted: 
Your committee on resolutions beg to present the following: 
We, the delegates and visitors from the various societies and 
churches to the annual W. M. U. meeting of the West Chowan Asso- 
ciation, desire to express our thorough appreciation to the W. M. S. 
and the good people of Ahoskie for their hospitality, and many cour- 
tesies extended to us during this session of the Association, We 
greatly appreciate the privilege of having with us Miss Mary War- 
ren, our State Corresponding Secretary, and Mrs, Minnie Anderson 
<?ur beloved Missionary from China. 

We wish to thank Mrs. George Williams, of Gatesville, and Miss 
Claude Stephenson, of Severn, for the special music rendered; Miss 
Ella Pierce and the Y. W. A's of Ahoskie for the wonderful pageant 
and lastly, to each and every one who in any way contributed to 
the pleasure and comfort, our grateful thanks. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. P. S'. VANN, 

MRS. HOMER PARKER, 

MRS. L. 'E. DAILEY, 

Committee. 

The meeting was then dismissed by Rev. £'. J. Isenhower. 

MISS UNA AVHITE, Superintendent. . 
MISS MARY PRITCHARD, S'ec-Treas, 



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TABLE No. 3, SUNDAY SCHOOLS— STATISTICAL SUMMARY. 



CHURCHES. 



SUPERINTENDENTS AND 
POST OFFICES. 



SECRETARIES AND 
POST OFFICES. 



Ahoskle 

Ashley's Grove. . 

Af^kewville 

A u lander 

Bethany 

Bethel 

Bethlehem 

Brantley's Grove, 

Buckhorne 

Cjipehart's 

Cashie 

Centre Grove. . . 
(Christian Harhor 

Colerain 

Coni^aritsa 

Conway 

C'reeksA'ille 

Karlev's 

Elani 



Oalatia 

Green's X Roads. 

Harrellsville 

Hebron 

Holly (irove 

Holly Sprin,i^s. . . . 

Horton's 

Jackson 

K el ford 

I-asker 

Lawrence 

Lewiston 

Mar.ijarettsville. . . 

IVIars Hill 

ISIclieri-in 

Menola 

l\r(M-ry Hill 

TVIonnt < 'Hrnicl . . . , 

Monnt Tabor 

i\rui-frcesboro 

Oak Grove 

Pine Forest 

Pleasant Gro^'c. . 

Potccasi 

P(nve!ls-.ille 

R<'i»nl)li("r.i 

R ich Suiiar(> ... . 

IMverside 

Roanoke . 

Roberts Chaji'd . . 
RoSvS'8 

Sandy Rnn 

Seaboard 

SeA'^ern 

Si loam 

Saint John 

TTiiion 

Win ton 

Woodland 



J. A. Eiey. Ahoskie 

W. 1>. Snmner. Mnrfreesboro. 
R. ( '. White. Askewville. . . . . 
Herbert Jenkins, Anlander... 

H. I- Parker. Colerain 

J. E. Daniel, Pleasant Hill... 
W. A. Thomas, Cofieldd 

D. E Minton. Ahoskie 

H. J. Vann. Como 

H. G. Evans. Merry Hill..., 
Herltert AV. Earh-. Windsor., 

C. S. Godwin. Ahoskie 

J. W. HoUenian. Harrellsville 

E. T. Forehand. Colerain 

J. S. .lenkiiis. Anlander 

C. W. Brittle, Conway 

Nezzie Davis, Conway 

M. A Johnson, Earleys 

C. H. Hart, Garvsbnr- 

Gilbert Davis, Seaboard 

D. AV. Castellow, Windsor.., 

E. D. ("allis. Harrelsvillr. . . , 

E H. Joyner, AA'oodland 

D. T. Harmon. INnyellsville. . . 

H T. Harrell, ( .(field 

p[. W. (Treen. Anlander 

A. C. (rav. Jackson 

J. E. Tyler, Kelford 

P. I>. A;-kew. Lasker 

T R. Oder, Aferry Hi^' 

T. N Peele, lewiston 

J. E. Piland, Mar«a)-ettsville, 

T. L. Alorris, C.derain 

J. K. Parkei-. AInrfn 



!]>or(). 



J as. C. Sessoms, Ahoskie 

Arnold Futrell, Mnrfreesboro. 

J. AV. Evans, Askewville 

A. A. Bnrden, Anlander 

J. O. iPerry, Colerain 

R. A. Daniel, Pleasant Hill. . . 

Ix'wis Jernif;an, Cotield 

Evelyn E. Kitf,' Ahoskie 

S P. AVinborne, Como 

AVilli.im Smith, Merry Hill 

J. H. Tadlock, AAMndsor 

A. S. Godwin, Ahoskie 



J. H. Fairless, Harrellsville 

N. G. Phelps, Colerain 

J. 8. Tilleiy, Anlander 

A. P. Lassiter. Conway 

J. D. Lanier. Conway 

Inez lienthal, Anlander R. 3... 

Philip G Reid, Garysbnrg- 

AA'. J. Edwards. Pendleton 

D. L. Cobb, AA'indsor , 

R. Taylor, Harrellsville 

T. A'ann, AVoodland 

L. Myers, Askewville 

Scoft, Cofteld 

(ii'een. Anlander 

. H. "^I'yler. Jackson 

T. Donj4htie, Kelford 

Lassiter, Lasker 

Clyde Harden. Merry Hill. 
While. Lewiston 



J. T. Chettv. AA'oodl.-md 

S A. Adams. Merrv Hill 

T- J. Stephenson. Se:i)»(iard 

O^'is Matthews, AInrfreesboi-o 

Dr. C. K Chamberlain, Mni'fi-eesboro 



M. 
H. 
W 

(\ L 
Z. V 
(}e<). 
Geo. 
R. C 
Airs. 
I). E. 

J. Rodney Piland, Alaryarettsville. 

Lee Powell. CriMno 

Godwin .lenkins. Mnrfreesboro 

iHenty P.rown. AVoodland 

j.A. E. P.owen. AAMn.lsor 

r. G. Hasty, Seaboard 

,AA'. T. Story. Mnrfrees))oro 

lAV! G. Parker. Mnrfreesboro 



J. L. Camp, Garysbnrj? 

C. A. Dunning, Anlander 

J. R. Baugham. (Poteeasi 

L. H. Freeman, Cremo 

S. C. Bntler, Windsor 

J. T. Bolton, Rich Sqnare 

N. J Miller, Merry Hill 

W. F. Nelson. Rich Sqnare 

J. C. Edwards, Pendleton 

G. C. Castellow. AVindsor 

C. C. Tyler, Roxobel 

J. R. Crocker. Seaboard 

H. P. Stephenson. Severn.... 

L. H. Speller, Windsor 

C. B. Vanghan. Ahoskie 

W. A. Miller, Ahoskie 

M. R. Herring. AA^nton 

N. Al. Griffin, Woodland 



Lillian \. Gami>. Garysburg 

Proi";l'tf»n Askew, Anlander 

G E. P.n-ker, Poteeasi , 

Afiron Howell. Powellsville 

(\ D. Pazeiuore. AVindsor 

R AA\ ()"ti;uHL Rich Sqmire 

AViilinn. AVilliams. Merry Hill 

Airs. Lillian Bridges. Rich Sqnare, 

At B. Ji)bnson, Pendleton 

AVa'ter .Miller, AVindsor 

V Y. Smith. Kelford 

Leon Spencer, Seaboard 

^i-ton Lewter, Severn 

"f\ R Speller. AA'^indsor 

AA'aiter Blow, Ahoskie 

T L. Dai'den. Ahoskie 

Aliss Olietha Vick 

>r!ss Geneva Benthal, Woodland. 



Totals 



I 



TABLE No. 3, SUNDAY SCHOOLS— STATISTICAL SUMMARY— (Contin ued.) 



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•I AI LF No. 5 -STATISTICAL SUMMARY OF B. Y. P. Ij s. 



PRESIDENTS AND POSTOPFICES. 



2 P 
5 ai 



C3 

52^ 



QP3 



= © 



Alioskie, Miss Noiiie Ncwsoine. Ahoskio.... 
Ashley's (xrove — Arnold Futroll, M'urfreesbo 
Askewville— Jesse K. White. Askewville. . . 
Auluuder 



Bethany — Charlie O. Lee, ( 'olerain 

Bethel 

Bethlehem— S. T. Hill, CoflekL 

Brantley's Grove — Willie Horton, Ahoskii 

Buckhorn — Thomas Bowles. Como 

Capehart's — 



31 



7r.| , 



601 



11 -27 

II 16 
11 4-2 



181 



Cashit 

Center (irove — 

Christian Harbor— J. A. Jiritt.Harrellsvilie 

Colerain — Tazwell Forehand. Colerain 

C'onnaritsa — J. W. Hall, Anlauder 

Conway 

Creeksville 

p]larleys — 



11 r.4i, 
.I....1 

11 40|, 



pjlam — 

Galatia — Miss Ennice Britton, Seaboard.... 

(ireen's X Roads — 

Harr(>llsville— Locke Mitchell. Harrellsville 

Hebron — Powell Joyner. Woodland 

Holly (hove— Miss ('as. Myers. Askewville. 

Holly Springs— I*. W. I'lMi-y. Coficld 

Horton's — 

Jackson — 

Kelford Miss Panline Har 
Laskei- — Annie Ogsey Bridg- 
Lawrence — 



.1....! ] 

11 16| 1 

.1....I 1 

.1....! 1 



noj. 

161 , 



161 



10 : :i 



ICclford , 
r.askcr. . 



L'!)l . 



Ij 3()| 21 591 
.1....! 11. ...| 



TiCwiston — John R. Peele. Lewiston 

Mari;:ir(>ttsville-J.A.Prn<len.:MargarcttsviIlc 
Mars Hill— 



11 281 



Meherrin — Miss Atta Chitty. ^I'nrfreeslxtro . 

Menola — W. H. Vinson. Woodland 

Merry Hiil— H. J. Holloman. Meiry Hill... 
Mount C;irnie! — Miss A. Matthews. Seaboard 
M'>niii Tabor — W. T. Story. Mni-fi-eesboro. 
Mnrfr(>esi)or(> — Miss A. Whit(>. Mnrfi*ees))or( 

O: C.M.^o - 

l*i)ie 1' orest - 

Pleasant Grove — 

Potecasi— Miss Gertie l',(\ilc. Potcc asi 

I'owellsville — Miss Fliz.-i Rnf tiu.d'owellsville . 

Republican — R. M. I'ittn.ian. Windsor 

Rich Square— James Tanner. Rich Square.. 

Riverside— Mi.ss Lela Yates. Merry Hill 

Roanoke — 



2! ool 

11 301, 

II 431 , 

11 2.-)! 



II 2()| 
..I....1 



3(il .... I .... I 

II 11I....I....I 



41 1021 

11 30|. 

1| 131. 

1| 251 . 

21 (541. 

21 31 1 



3! 1021 901 » 

:|-5|::::i::: 



111. 

281 



3(»|. 



.!....i....\...l 
.1....I....I....I 
II 30|. .. .1. .. .1, 



Rolx'rts Chapel — Mi,^ 
Ross's — 



K. ,\tkins(>ii.Pendletor 



Sandy Run — Leon Peele. Roxobel 

Seaboard — MLss Welma West. Seaboard. 

Severn — Quinton Taylor, Sevei-n 

Siloam — 

St. John- 
Union — . . 
Win ton — . 
Woodland 



Flora Edwards. Ahoskie. 



H. Liverman. Woodland 



201. 



I II 
I II 

1 1! 



211 
251 



II 3S| I....1. 



1! 241. .. .1. .. .1 11 
T 20|. .. .!. .. .1. .. .1. 
11 21 1 .... I .... I .... I . 



671 

561, 
45! 



301 



381. 
...I, 



381 



M 2 451....!, 
,1 II 201.... I , 
,| II 211. ...I, 



II 311. ...|.. ..I. ...I, 



II 31].. ..1, 



II 4,S| . . . . I . . . . I , 



481 . 



Totals :',4!1().->6| 3! 93| 131 308| 54);i457| 7| 2991 



Ahoskie — I. J. Is^enhower, Ahoskie; Licensed 
Minister and Volunteer for Missions. 

Bethany — S. B. Barnes, Colerain: Minister; 

Brantley's Grove — 1 l.ictMistd Minister and 3 
Voluiiters for Missions. 

Buckhoin — E. N. Gardner. I'endleton; Minister. 

Cashie — W. R. Haight, Windsor; Licensed Min- 
ister. 

Co-lernin— R. B. Lineberrv. S. F. Bristow, Cole- 
rain; 1 Volunteer for Missions. 
Conway- R. T. White. Conway; Minister. 
Greene's X Roads — 1 Licensed Minister. 
Jkckson — J. P Essex, Jackson; Minister. 
Kelford— W. H. Hollowell, Kelford. 



Meherrin — H. G. Bryant, Mnrfreesboro. Minis 
Mount Tabor— V. E. Duncan, Winton; Minis 
Mnrfreesboro- Julius W. Whitley, Murfreest 

^Minister; 2 Volunteers for Missions. 
Republican— A. E. C. Pittman, Windsor; Mil 
Rich Square -.Tesse Blalock. Rich Square; iVTii 
Robert's Chapel — E. N. Gardner, Pendleton; 

ister. 

Sandy Run— J. F. Cale, Roxobel; Minister. 
Severn — J. W. Downey, Severn: Minister. 
Siloam— G. D. Lej?gett, Siloam; Minister. 
St. John — D. Cale. I'otecasi; Minister. 
Union — J. Fred Stimpson, Winton: Minister 



tTWINUTES 



OF THE 



Forty-First Annual Session 



OF THE 



WEST CHOWAN 

Baptist Association. 



HELD WITH 



MURFREESBORO BAPTIST CHURCH, 

Hertford j^County 

OCTOBER 30 and 31, 1923. 



The next session to be held with Cashie Church, Biertie County, 
beginning on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October, 1924. 
To preach the sermon, E. J. Isenhower; Alternate, -B. N. Gardner. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 
Nash Brothers, Printers and Binders 
1923 



cTWINUTES 

OF THE 

Forty-First Annual Session 

OF THE 

WEST CHOWAN 

Baptist Association, 

HELD WITH 

MURFREESBORO BAPTIST CHURCH, 

Hertford CountjT 

OCTOBER 30 and 31, 1923. 



The next session to be held with Cashie Church, Biertie County, 
beginning on Tuesday after the fourth Sunday in October, 1924. 
To preach the sermon, E. J. Isenhower; Alternate, -E. N. Gardner. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 
Nash Brothers, Printers and Binders 
1923 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS. 



Resident Pastors. 

^- CJale Potecasi, N. O. 

John F. Gale. Roxobel, N. C. 

R. B. Lineberry Winton, ,N. C. 

J. W. Downey Severn,"N. a 

L. E. Dailey Colerain, N. C. 

J. H. Barnes Merry Hill, N. C. 

Geo., D. Leggett Windsor, N. C. 

?• Sl^!^^^®^ Pendleton, N C. 

J. W. Whitley , .Murfreesboro, N. C. 

S. F. Bristow Colerain,' N. a 

H. G. Bryant Murfreesboro, N. C. 

J. P. Essex Jackson, N. C. 

R., R. Lanier Seaboard, N. C* 

B. J. Isenhower Ahoskie, N. C. 

J. Fred Stimson Aulander, N. C. 

M. P. Davis Lewiston, N. C. 

a C. S^mith Windsor, N C. 

T. E. Walters Colerain, N. C. 

C. M. Billings Rie-h Square, N. C. 

J. L. Powers Windsor, R. 1, N. C. 

Non-Resident Pastor. 

T. S. Crutchfield Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

Ordained Ministers Not Pastors. 

R. T., White....... ^ Conway, N. C. 

Dancy Dempsey . . , .Wake Forest, N. C. 

R. E. Clark. .Murfreesboro, N. C. 

OFFICERS: 

Dr. C. G. Powell, Moderator Ahoskie, N. C. 

W. D. Barbee, Vice-Moderator • Seaboard,' N. C. 

R. B. Lineberry, Clerk Winton, N. C. 

W. A. Thomas, Treasurer Cofield N C. 

Jno. F. Cale, Historian Roxcbel N. C 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Dr. C. G. Powell, W. D. Barbee, R. B. Lineberry, H. G. Bryant, Paul Fleet- 
wood, J. H. Matthews, N., W. Britton. J. T. Bolton, J. J. Taylor, Mrs. E. Bu 
Vaughan, Miss Una White, Mrs. Herbert Jenkins. 



CONSTITUTION. 



Name. 

Article 1. This body shall be known as the North Carolina West Chowan 
-Baptist Association. 

Membership. 

Art. 2. It shall be composed of messengers elected by thei churches con- 
nected with this body, and all ordained ministers who are memhers or pas- 
tors of said churches, together with the officers of this Association, and 
chairmen of all standing committees. Each church of one hundred members 
and under shall be entitled to two messengers, and for each additional one 
hundred members, an additional messenger; Provided, that no church shall 
have more than four messengers. 

Objects. 

Art. 3. The objects shall be to devise and recommend measures for in- 
creasing the harmony, the intelligence and the spiritual power of the church- 
es, and for developing and directing their energies, their resources, and their 
gifts, in advancing the Redeemer's Kingdom in the earth. 

Powers and Prerogiatives. 

Art. 4. The Association shall have no power lo infringe upon the sover- 
eignty or rights of the churches. It is neither an ecclesiastical nor legisla- 
tive council, nor court of appeal.. It may advise the churches and recom- 
mend measures of usefulness for' their adoption^ but can not bind them in 
any way. Yet, in view of the combined wisdom, piety and intelligence of 
the body, it may justly claim for itself, for its objects and for its; recommen- 
dation the very highest consideration and regard. 

Art. 5. The Association may dissolve connection with any church that be- 
comes hetorodox in doctrine, or disorderly in practice, or that fails to repre- 
sent itself, either by messenger or letter, more than two successive ses- 
sions, without sufficient reasons, or that treats with contempt its objects, 
and requirements, or upon application of a church for dismission. 

Rights of Churches. 

Art. 6. Each individual church shall hold and exercise all the functions 
t>t an independent church of Jesus Christ. As constituent members of this 
Association, the churches shall have right to advise, when desired, in case 
of difficulty, and to suggest plans of usefulness to be adopted. It shall be the 
undisputed privilege of any church to withdraw its membership from this 
Association whenever it shall so elect. 

Duties of Churches. 

Art. 7. It shall be the duty of the churches to appoint as messengers, as 
far as practicable, their most capable members, to require their attendance, 
and to send by them, a contribution to the Association fund to pay for print- 
ing the minutes and other necessary expenses.. 

Art. 8. It shall be the duty of each church to send an annual letter to the 
Association, giving: (1) locality; (2) names of its pastor and clerk and their 
respective postoffices; (3) the Sabbaths of regular service; (4) the church 
statistics, including the number baptized, received by letter, restored, dis- 
missed, deceased, expelled and aggregate membership, male and femft-le; 
<5) Siabbath School statistics; (6) amount contributed to benevolent objects 



WEIST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 5 

and the Association fund; (7) names of messengers and alternates- (8) any 
other information deemed of special importance. 

Organization. 

Art. 9. The officers of this Association shall be a Moderator Vice-Modera- 
tor, Clerk, Treasurer, and Historian, who- shall be elected at each annual 
session, from the members of the Association, and shall continue in office 
until the next annual election, which election shall be the next order of 
business after the enrollment of messengers. As soon as the new officers 
shall have taken their seats, the body shall be declared organized and pre- 
pared for business. ^ 

Al^- l^'^ ^"lu^^^^^ conserve time and not interfere with the main work 
of the body, this Association will not consider any routine or miscellaneous 
business except at the close of the discussion of each general topic. 

Duties of Officers. 

Art. 11, rt shall b^ the duty of the Moderator to open the meetings punct- 
ually at time appointed; to enforce the rules; to preserve order and to exer- 
cise all the prerogatives of a presiding officer, according to th^ princinles 
of parliamentary usage. - ' 

fiJfl:?H- 1} ^^.thf.^^ty of the Vice-Moderator to discharge the du- 

ties of the Moderator m his absence. 

Art. 13. It shall be the duty of the Clerk to keep a faithful record of the 
proceedings of the body, and superintend the printing and distribution of 
same, and to keep on file the printed Minutes and other important docu- 
ments belonging to the body. He may appoint an assistant when necessary. 
Ar.P?A l^Tf^'V'' ^-'^ services, fifty dollars out of the minute fund 
Art. 14. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive and disburse the 

rrnnuTrennrt''/?/^' ^''''''"^ b^^^' and maki 

an annual report of the same. 

ar.t''^'^^- l^. ^^^^l ^f. ^""^y Historian, who shall be elected at each 

h?^nr o??'.t'';^''/i' ^S^^-'.'^ P^^P^^^ publication in the Minutes an 
historical sketch of the church with which the Association meets with obit- 
uaries, incidents and other facts of the year that should be preserved, and 
make report to the next Association., 

rr.Afl'Jl'^ first day of the session there shall be appointed a com- 

mittee of finance, committee on time, place, and preacher and a committee of 
^.L T^^'^ .^"""""if nominate representatives of Boards and to uomi- 
nate an Executive Committee of twelve members to be composed of the 
^untlef Clerk, and at least one woman from each of the 

bodfhvLJ^'^^.^''"?!!"!,'''''.?.^^ ^^^^^^^ a^^^al session of the 

body by a vote of two-thirds of the members present. 

Resolutions. 

hndflTf -^^ That no church shall be entitled to representation in this 
body unless m perfect accord with the Constitution thereof that fact to be 
ascertamed by a committee of five on credentials, appointed a each session 
tascertamed by a committee of five on credentials, appointed at each ses- 
sion of the body immediately after organization; (2 the report of oom 
rAdop'ted'lsGS.) ''''''''' Association ^-ust as'any 'o?her' repo" 

^r.^r^n^^^^'i if^^^f^ heuceforth this Association withdraw fellowship from 
any church that allows its members to engage in the manufacture and saS 
of intoxicating liquors as a beverage ((1891 ) ^^anuraciure and sale 

cattruWs'^thT^^^^^^^ V''' '"^'^ ^^^^ Association that selling intoxi- 



6 



FORTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 



RULES OF ORDER. 

1. The Association shall convene annually at the time and place of its 
own adjournment. 

2. During each annual session it shall meet and adjourn from day to day 
at the hours fixed upon by the body. 

3. All meetings of the Association shall be opened and closed with relig- 
ious exercises. 

4. A majority of the members present shall be a quorum for the transac- 
tion of business. 

5. No member shall absent himself temporarily without leave of the 
Moderator, nor finally without leave of the body. 

6. No member shall speak more than twice on the same subject without 
permission of the body. 

7. No member shall be allowed to talk, stand up, read or move about the 
house during business, except to gain or impart information under consider- 
ation. 

8. No committee shall be in session during the hour of business without 
permission from the body. 

9. All questions of order not herein provided shall be decided by Mell's 
Parliamentary Practice. 



ORDER OF BUSINESS. 

For the West Chowan Association, meeting at Cashie Baptist Church, Tues- 
day and Wednesday after the fourth Sunday in October, 1924. 

First Day. 

10:30 A.M. — Devotional Service, M. P. Davis. 

11:00 A.M.— Organization. Visitors welcomed. Committees Appointed. 

New Churches received. 
11:15 A.M. — Biblical Recorder. 

11:40 A.M. — Introductory Sermon, E. J. I'senhower; Alternate, E. N, Gardner. 
12:40 P.M.— Recess for Dinner. 
1 : 45 P.M. — Devotioual Service^ G. D. Leggett. 

2:00 P.M. — Report on Missions, State, Home, Foreign, and Woman's Work, 
Discussion of same. 

3:30 P.M. — Miscellaneous. Assignment of Delegates. 

7:00 P.M. — Praise Service, J. W. Whitley. 

7:20 P.M. — ^Report on Education. 

7:40 P.M. — Discussion Sunday Schools. 

8:00 P.M.— Discussion B. Y. P. U. 

8:20 P.M. — Discussion Ministerial Education.. 

Second Day. 
10:00 A.M. — Devotional Service. L. E Dailey. 
10:20 A.M. — Discussion Christian Education, 
11:20 A.M. — Report on Social Service. 
11:40 A.M. — ^Discussion Orphanage. 
12:10 P.M. — Discussion Hospitals. 

12:30 P.M. — Miscellaneous. Adjournment for Dinner, 
1:30 P.M. — Devotional Service, S. F. Bristow. 

1:45 P.M. — Discussion Ministerial Relief and Other Items of Siocial Service. 

2:10 P.M. — Report of Committee on Digest of Reports. 

2:25 P.M.— Historian's Report. 

2:40 P.M. — Miscellaneous. Adjournment. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Order of Business — M. P. Davis, E.. N. Gardner, H. G. Bryant. 
Missions — R. R. Lanier, J. L. Powers. Mrs. E. A. Huggins. 
Education— C, C. Smith, J. W. Downey, Jno, P., Cale. 
Social Service — T. E. Walters, J. P. Essex, C. M. Billings. 



PEOCEEDIlsrGS. 



October 30, 1923. 

The West Chowan Association met at 10 o'clock to-day in its forty- 
first annual session with the Mnrfreesboro Baptist church, Murfreesr 
boro, Hertford County, I^. C. 

Devotional exercises conducted by R. R. Lanier, prayers Dy T. W. 
Downey and J. H. Matthews. Moderator C. G. Powell called the 
Association to order and the following delegates were enrolled : 

UST OF DELEGATES. 

Ahoskie^ — S. E. Vaughan, F., G. Taylor. 

Ashley's Grove — T. H. Vinson, J. T. Parker. 

Askewville — Letter, no delegates. 

Aulander — -Chas. H. Jenkins, H. T. Dunning 

Bethany— D. E. White, W., R. Baker. 

Bethel— W. R. Massey, M. M. Male. 

Bethlehem — W. A. Thomas, W. A. Perry, W. E. Perry.. 

Brantley's Grove — P. D., Parker. 

Buekhorne — S. P. Winhorne. 

Capeharl's — G. P. Perry, W. L. Baker. 

Cashie— W. L. Gatling, J. H. Matthews, W., R. Thompson. 
Center Grove— C. S-. Godwin, J. D. Jenktins, J. R. Williford. 
Christian Harbor — S. Hare, F. P. Britt. 
Colerain — A. A. Pierce. 

Connaritsa — John P. Slade, Raleigh Pritchard. 
ConAvay— R. V. Nelson, R. T. White., 
Creeksville — Nezzie Davis, J. D. Lanier. 
Farley's — Letter, no delegates. 
Elam— C. H. Hart. 
Galatia — B. Taylor. 

Greene's X Roads — J. E. Pierce, W. J. Mizelle.. 

Harrellsville— B. N. Sykes. J. H. Evans, G. L. Castellow. 

Hebron — Letter, no delegates. 

Holly Grove — Letter, no delegates. 

Holly S'prings — ^W., A. McGlohon, D. F. Sure. 

Horton's — H. W. Greene, S. W. Greene. 

Jackson — ^R. W. Fleetwood. 

Kelford— C. L. L. Cobb, W. W. Newsome, C. E. Parker, W. D. Brown., 

Lasker — R. E. Peele. 

Lawrence — Letter, no delegates. 

Lewiston — Dr. W. Mitchell, T. L. Minton, J, E, Britton. 

Margarettsville — J. G. Stancell. 

Mars Hill— J. T. Harrell. 

Meherrin—C. H. Chittv L B. Jenkins. 

Menola— H. U, Griffith. 

Merry Hill — Letter, no delegate. 

Mount Carmel — Mrs. J. T. Stevenson, C. P. Parker, H. T. Boyd. 
Mount Tabor— T. T. Parker, J. L. Story, G. B. Story., 

Mnrfreesboro — J. C. S'pires, J. D. Babb, C. E. Boyette. . • 

Oak Grove— S'. L. Marsh, H. C. Holloman, R. A. Hollowell. 
Pine Forest — ^I^etter, no delegates. 

Pleasant Grove— E. B Parker, C. A. Dunning, W. E. Leggett. 
Potecasi — S. M. Parker. 



8 



FORTY-FIRST ANNUAL SBSiSION 



Powellsville — J. J. Alston, J. E. R. Perry, L, H. Freeman. 

Republican— A. V. Cobb, J. E. Butler. 

Rich KSquare — J. T. Bolton. 

Riverside— Letter, no delegates. 

Roanoke — J. H. Bras well. 

Robert's Chapel — D, N. 'Stephenson. 

Ross'— J., T. Hoggard, G. C. Castellow. 

Sandy Run — .Ino. F. Cale, J. A. Waisou. 

S'eaboard — H. P. Speufer, ,J. P. Crocker. 

Severn — J. S, Jcyner. 

Siloam — Letter, no delegates. 

St. John — Letter, no delegates. 

Union — R, C. Hollornan. 

Winron— N. W. Britton. 

Woodland— J. P. Griffin. 

On motion of D. Cale, the old officers were re-elected: Dr. C. G. 
Powell, Moderator ; W. D. Barbee, Vice-Moderator ; R. B. Lineberry, 
Clerk; W. A. Thomas, Tieasurer; Jno. F. Cale, Historian. 

Program offered by Committee, amended by Pastor's Conference, 
adopted. 

The following new pastors were recognized: T. E. Walters, C. C. 
Smith, C. M. Billings,* J. L. Powers, M. P. Davis and Dr. C. P. 
Wea^'cr, Presidenf of Chowcin College. 

In addition to these the following pastors were present : D. Cale, 
Jno. F. Cale, J. W. Downey, R. B. Lineberry, L. E. Dailey, J. H. 
Barnes, Geo. D. Leggett, E. IST. Gardner, J. W. Whitley, S. F. Bris- 
tow, H. G. Bryant, T. P. Essex, R. P. Lanier, E. J. Isenhower, J. 
Fred Stimson. 

W. R. Beach, of ITillsboro, was recognized as representative of Bib- 
lical Recorder on which he addressed the Association as did also C. 
L. L. Cobb. 

After song, s-pecial music was rendered by representatives of Cho- 
wan College. 

After scripture reading by Jno. F. Cale the annual sermon was 
preached by J. P. Essex: Text, Ephesians 5:25. 

A cordial invitation to dinner was extended by pastor J. W. Whit- 
ley and the Association adjourned. 



TTTE8DAY AFTERT\T00"N^ SESSTOTn. 

Devotional service conrlucted by T. E. Walters. Moderator an- 
nounced committees: 

Finance — Paul Fleetwood, J. D. Babb. 

Time, Place and Preacher — C. L. L. Cobb, Henry Stephenson, P. P. Britt. 
Nominations— Dr. W. Mitchell, J. W. Fleetwood. J. A. Williams. 



WFJST CBOWAN ASS'OCTATION. 



E. J. Isenliower read 

REPORT ON MISSIONS AND WOMEN'Si WORK. 

Our Divine Lord did not leave to human initiative the work of evangeliz- 
ing the earth. "Ye shall be my witnesses both in Jerusalem, and in all 
Judea and Samaria, and unto the uttermost part of the earth," is His sov- 
ereign command to His followers, and hence the making of disciples of all 
the nations is the supreme task of all , believers of ail time. 

in conceiving the scheme ct redemption Jehovah's mind dwelt not upon na- 
tional lines nor geographical divisions. His plan comprehended the entire 
race of mankind. Yet, in laying out the work of the propagation of the gos- 
pel, the territory is divided, for matters of convenience and efficiency, into 
Home and Foreign Fields. For the early disciples, Jerusalem, and all Judea 
and Samaria constituted the Home Field, while all the regions beyond, even 
to the uttermost part of the earth, was Foreign Mission territory. 

The mission work of Southern Baptists today is similarly laid out. We 
too have our Home Field and our Foreign Fields. In cur Home Field a 
number of agencies are operating such as city mission boards in our cities, 
county, district, and associational mission boards in certain sections, state 
mission boards in the individual states, and finally the Heme Mission Board 
with headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia. But for all our vast Foreign Mission 
territory we have but the one agency, namely, the Foreign Mission Board. 

I. S'TATE MISSIONS. 

A little more than ninety-three years ago Baptist State Missions in North 
Carolina had its incipiency. God has seemed to smile upon it and the work 
has been steadily growing through the years. Our State Board of Missions 
now has its work divided into a number of departments which we shall no- 
tice briefly. 

1. Miss^onaf'y Pastors Assistance. 

Last year 202 missionary pastors were aided, who served 356 churches, 
delivered 18,446 sermons and addresses, organized 12 new churches, built 
12 new church houses, baptized 3,845 converts and added to the Churches 
a total of 6,309 new members. Only 175 men are on this force this yt^ar. 
Great things are being accomplished by them. 

2. Evangelism. 

This is the second year of this department. Superintendent Herman T, 
Stephens and three associate evangelists last year wrought a mighty work. 
Under their ministry 2,032 members were added to the churches, 1,461 of 
these by baptism. Many other great results too numerous to mention in 
this short space were o-btained. This year the number on the staff is the 
same and a fine work is being done. 

3. EnJ stment. 

Superintendent A. C. Hamby and his co-workers, in addition to holding 
numerous institutes and assisting in various phases of denominational work, 
arranged during last year 14 pastoral fie'ds, organized five new churches, 
built five and bought two pastoriums, opened up nine missions, added to 
pastors salaries $11,499.00 in new subscriptions, and raised $489.80 in cash 
and pledges for State Missions. 

4. Sunday Schools. 

This staff consists of Secretary Middleton, an Eilemantary worker, and 
two field workers. This is the twenty-eighth year that this work has been 



10 



FORTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 



fostered by our State Mission Board. And results have been indeed gratify- 
ing, but are too numerous for mention here. 

5. B. Y. P. U. 

Secretary Perry Morgan and Miss Farabow, the Intermediate and Junior 
Secretary are building up a .great system of B. Y. P. Us., in the State. New 
unions are constantly being organized and old ones are being raised to 
higher standards of efficiency. If this work goes on, as it is now going, 
we shall soon have a great host of young well trained workers for bringing 
in the kingdom. 

6. Women's Work. 

See further on toward end of report.. 

Church Building. 

Last year 21 churches were assisted in their building enterprises to the 
amount of $11,279.14. And numerous calls came from all parts of the state 
from strategic situations., What vast good could be done if we only had th.e 
means! If the people would only pay up their 75 Million pledges! 

8. Book Department. 

The Book Department is in a flourishing condition. It is constantly grow- 
ing, and doing a great service to our people. 

Finally, the outlook is glorious for our State Mission work. The only 
great need is funds. May the people pay up their pledges? 

II. Home Missions. 

Our Home Mission Bo'ard is the great pioneer agency that has made the 
'Southland such a prolific Baptist stronghold. Furthermore, this Board is 
a great unifying agency, as it seeks to maintain the closest relations with 
each of the several state boards. And much of its work is done in co-opera- 
tion with these boards. We can but skim the surface of the work in this 
report. 

1. Co-operative Missions. 

Last Conventional year $182,799.96 was spent in the several states in co- 
operating with the State Mission Boards in employing missionaries. 941 
missionaries were employed and 3,551 churches served, 37,925 new members 
were added and 21,400 of these were by baptism; many new church houses 
were erected and a goodly number o-f churches constituted. 

2. Evangelism. 

The staff last year consisted of 28 evangelists, preachers and singers. 
These men go anywhere for meeting and campaigns within the bounds of 
the Southern States. Their work is sane and of the New Testament type 
of Evangelism. More than 17,000 new members were brought into the 
churches last year through the labors of these men, and over 13,000 of these 
were by baptism. Moreover, there were scores of converts from their meet- 
ings that joined the churches of other denominations. 

3. Enlistment. 

More than $72,000 was spent by the Home Board last year in the work of 
her Enlistment Department. The results were gratifying. One of the great 
tasks performed by this department last year and the early part of this 
was to co-nduct in co-operation with the S'unday School Board's forces 
a vast survey of the country churches throughout the territory of the South- 
ern Baptist Convention. And more than 10,000 such churches responded 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 11 

by filling out and sending in the questionaires sent them. Many other great 
results were wrought. 

4. Mountain Schools. 

There are 31 of these schools scattered throughout the mountain sections 
of the South. Seven of these are located in North Carolina. Great multi- 
tudes of the finest mountain boys and girls flock to these schools every year 
and numbers of them are turned away for lack of room and equipment 
Over 5,000 students were taken care of in these schools last year. What a 
pity that any of them who came had to be turned away. From out of these 
great mountain sections have come some of the greatest men and women 
of our nation. 

5. Some Other Activities. 

Some of the other activities of our Home Board need to be mentioned. 
Her hospital work, mission work in Cuba and Panama, Missionary worfe 
among the Foreigners, the Indians, the Jews, and the Negroes in our midst. 
These can merely be mentioned. There is also her work with soldiers, the 
seamen and the marines. Her great Seamen's Institute is ministering both 
to the bodies and the souls of the seamen and marines that come within its 
scope. 

III. FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

What the State Boards and the Home Mission Board are doing for the 
peoples in our Home Land, the Foreign Mission Board is also doing, as far 
as possible, for the benighted nations of the earth. Slie is now undertaking 
mission work among the peoples of 14 different nations and upon five great 
continents, namely North America, South America, Africa, Asia, and at last 
in Europe. 

1. iVIissions in North America. 

Mexico, is our Foreign Board's territory on this continent. She has been 
doing a great work in Mexico for some years, and God is abundantly bless- 
ing the work there, and is turning that people from the darkness of papacy 
and superstition to the light of the true gospel. 

2. South America. 

In South America our board is doing both extensive and intensive work 
in Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay under what is known ts the Argentina 
Mission. There are more than thirteen million souls in this territory 
and some of the finest of Latin America. Brazil is another of our great 
Mission Fields and a most telling work is being done both in the North, 
and the South Brazil Missions.. Chile is also one of our promising fields in 
Sonth America. 

3. Africa. 

The dark continent is waking up and turning to the light of life because 
of the teaching and preaching of the gospel in that land of the shadows.. 

4. Asia. 

The cradle of mankind, and the geographical source of nearly all the great 
religions of the earth. Afid yet Asia furnishes the chief Foreign Mission 
Territory of all Christendom. 

1. China. 

This is our great Foreign Mission Field, our pride. Five great missions 
are maintained in this land of its hundreds of millions of souls in darkness. 



12 



FORTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 



namely, the Central China Mission, the Interior China Mission, the North 
China Mission, the Pakhoi Mission, and the South China Mission. A greater 
number of our Missionaries are found in these great and prolific fields. 
Each of these Missions has its many stations and out stations spreading ' 
its work over a vast territory. Many of our great mission schools and 
hospitals are in China and the medical missionary and the Christian teacher 
is doing a mighty work in that land, and old China is slowly but surely 
turning from Confusianism, Buddism, and Mohammedanism to the light of 
the cross of Calvary. 

2. Japan. 

'Second to China in the orient is Japan as a missionary opportunity. While 
her territory is small yet there are teeming* millions of her people and she 
is rapidly waking up. We must save her or she will have much to do in 
ruining the world. Our work in Japan is promising. 

3. Palestine and Siberia. 

Our Board has a prosperous work though young in the land of the Lord's 
nativity. And since the Word of the Lord went forth from Jerusalem let us 
carry it back to her people again. We are also doing work in the far off 
land of S'iberia. 

5. Europe. 

In addition to our great Italian Mission our board is now fostering mis- 
sion work in Spain,, in Jugo'slavia, in Hungary and in Rumania, and some 
of these new fields are the most promising ones we have. And there are 
other most inviting fields in Europe. The great World War broke up many 
of the great political organisms of that mighty continent and since the 
political and the religious organisms were so closely allied the religious 
conditions there have been put into a chaotic, hence a plastic state. 

Since the beginning of the 75-Million Campaign six new countries have 
been entered by our Foerign Mission Board, 275 new missionaries have 
been sent out, and over 34,000 persons have been baptized on our Foreign 
Fields. Schools, hospitals, churches and other new equipment has been 
provided. Our Board is now under a tremendous debt as is also our State 
and Home Boards. Our work is too great we cannot afford to rr^itrench. 
We must pay our pledges. 

IV. THE WOMEN'S WORK. 

Our women throughout the Southland are doing a mighty work. Through 
their own societies, and their auxiliaries, the Y. W., As, the G. As., the 
R. As., and the S'. Ss.. They have raised vast sums of money and besides 
certain work they are maintaining independently both at home and on the 
Foreign Fields they are helping out in a great way in all our Denomina- 
tional Program. 

Through their mission study courses and courses along all lines of king- 
dom work our women are gaining vast knowledge of kingdom affairs, and 
are showing the value of such knowledge in their zeal for and their efficiency 
in the great work of our Master. 

As to money raised by the W. M. U. of our own State, our women reported 
the grand total of $305,752.89, in the minutes of their general meeting in 
March. The grand total for the women of West Chowan Association was 
$17,018.72. 



I 



WESiT CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



13 



CONCLUSION. 

We recommend that a general campaign be put on for the raising of the 
remainder of the 75-Million pledges, that will equal in intensity that of the 
campaign which was waged in the securing of the pledges; that such cam- 
paign be organized in the bounds of this Association, and that we suggest 
to the leaders of our Denomination that it be put on throughout the whole 
South., Our Mission Secretary informs me that for us, in this glorious State 
of North Carolina to be able to meet the quota of our State's apportionment 
for the first four years, the apportionment mind you, not what we pledged, 
that we must raise between now and the meeting of our State Convention, 
at least $1,000,000.00. What a tragedy if we fail! 

Respectfully submitted, E. J. ISENHOWER. 

On motion to adopt, Dr. Clias. E. Maddiy was recognized and 
spoke. Report adopted. 

By motion it was agreed to liold morning session at the College 
Auditorium and come back to tke church for the afternoon. 

Homes were assigned and adjourned with benediction by J, L. 
Powers. 



TUESDAY I^IGHT SESSIOK 

Devotional service by J. L. PoAvers. J. W. Whitley read the re- 
port on Education : 

REPORT ON EDUCATION. 

There is no more vital subject before us today as a denomination than 
Christian Education. I say this because our report covers Sunday schools, 
B. Y. P. U., Chowan College, and other Colleges and schools. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

Baptist Sunday School work in North Carolina has shown marvelous 
growth and development during the past year in numbers of schools, in mem- 
bership, in efficiency of organization, in buildings and equipment, in teach- 
er training. Under the leadership of Sec. E. L. Middleton and his co-workers 
these things have been stressed as a means to the' end that the Word of 
God may be so taught as to lead people to' a personal knowledge of Jesus 
Christ as Saviour from sin, to the acceptance and public profession of Him 
as Saviour and to growth in grace and knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ. 

Number. 

We stand first among the States in the South in number of Sunday Schools 
to the number of churches, having 2,174 Baptist S'unday schools in the state. 
New Sunday schools are being organized every year but the aim is a Sun- 
day school in every Baptist church in the state. 

Membership. 

In membership we rank second, with 265, 49R enrolled in S'unday schools. 
For every 100 church members there are nearly 82 people in the Smnday 
school in North Carolina. But 55 of these are not church members and we 
are facing the humiliating fact that our Sunday school enrollment is far 



14 



FORTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 



behind our church enrollment., There are at least 500,000 people who belong 
to our constituency and go to no Sunday school. If they are not in Sunday 
school, it is most probable that the Word is not being hid in their hearts. 
One of our big tasks is to enlist our church members in the Bible School. 

Another big task is to reach and train the 250,000 children who belong to 
Baptist Sunday schools.. 

Organization. 

The Standard of Excellence as erected by the Baptist Sunday School 
Board, Nashville, is being recognized more and more as a measure of effi- 
ciency and a well-rounded and worth while program. We rank second in 
standard schools, twenty-seven having attained the standard to date. In 
addition, two Sunday schools have reached the Advanced of AA-1 Standard. 
There are only four other such schools in the Southern Baptist Convention. 

' Buildings and Equipment. 

Buildings are being improved as never before in order to adequately care 
for improved Sunday schools, with corresponding improvement in equip- 
ment. Over 100 new or remodeled church houses are being built. The 
Architectural Department of the Sunday School Board stands ready to fur- 
nish expert advice so that money invested in buildings may be wisely spent 
to meet modern needs. 

Teaclier Training. 

It is the very heart and life of all Sunday school work. Without trained 
teachers, inferior work is inevitable. With trained teachers, almost any 
ideal is possible. When churches realize the tremendous responsibility of 
so sacred a task as grafting the living truth of God'S; will into living souls 
for time and eternity, they will arouse to the absolute necessity of entrust 
Ing that task in the hands of only trained teachers. 

North Caroina stands well to the front in this work but we must press 
forward. This work is fostered through Training Schools in town and city 
churches, through the Summer Campaign for country churches, and through 
the Correspondence Course for those who cannot attend a class. 

During tbe year a splendid book "Building a Country Sunday School" by 
iSecretary E. L, Middleton has been published and is receiving much favor- 
able comment. It recognizes difficulties, presents practical plans for solving 
them and gives vision of what a country church, which measures up to its 
possibilities, may be. 

Recommendations. 

The urgency of the Sunday school task calls to each church: 

1. To adopt a definite program of persistent effort to reach the unreached 
and untaught and especially to enlist more of the church members for the 
Sunday schools. 

2. To provide better build]lngs and equipment to make a place to' hold 
and really teach the increased number enlisted. 

3. To plan for a worth-while program of all-round efficiency as embodied 
in the Standard of Excellence. 

4. To adopt a permanent Teacher Training policy looking toward enlist- 
ing every teacher and officer in the Normal Course and training prospective 
officers and teachers for the future. 

The Sunday School Department of our State Mission Board stands ready 
to help any church in putting on these plans. 

REPORT ON B. Y. P. U. 

The Baptist Young People's Union of America was organized in 1890. It 
came into life because of the wide-spread effect of the Christian Endeavor 



WEST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION, 



15- 



movement, and was a noble effort to so organize the Baptist Young People 
as to keep them identified with our own work and, under our own influence. 
The first convention was held in Chicago in 1891. 

In the South, the new organization attracted much attention. Many of 
the brethren found in it that which they especially desired. 

In 1893, a committee reported to the Southern Baptist Convention com- 
mending the organization of societies in the local churches, and that these 
societies "be under the sole authority of the church, without interdenomi- 
national affiliation/' 

The Southern B. Y. P. U. was organized in Atlanta, Ga,, November, 1896. 

The present B. Y. P. U. of North Carolina was organized in Ridge Crest 
in 1909. The first State Convention was held with the Second Baptist 
Church, Durham, June, 1910. About ten unicns with approximareiy 350 
members were represented at the convention. The work has grown mar- 
velously since that time., There are now in the State 1180 unions with a 
membership of over forty thousand. 

There are two "whole time B. Y. P. U. workers. They are available for 
both city and country schools. The B. Y. P. U. Headquarters is 214 Biblical 
Recorder Building, Raleigh, N. C. The workers are Perry Morgan, General 
Secretary and Miss Elma Leigh Farabow, Secretary of .Junior and Inter- 
mediate work. 

The object of the Baptist Young People's Union, as given in the B., Y. 
P. U., Manual, shall be the increased spirituality of the young Christians; 
their training in essential church activities; their edification in Scriptural 
knowledge; their instruction in Baptist doctrine and history; their enlist- 
ment of all forms of missionary endeavor through existing denominational 
organizations. The meaning of which is, in brief, Inspiration. Preparation 
and Service. 

The B. Y. P. U. is the training service of a Baptist church and as such 
should be under church control, supported by the Church financially and oth- 
erwise. The church should e^ect its officers, publicly install them and recog- 
nize tbem as church officers and call upcn Ihem for reports. The B. Y. P. U. 
is a church task and should be assumed seriously as such by the church. 
Churches are weak because the members are weak. In the future our church- 
es will be strong in just the proportion that we train and enlist our constit- 
uency 'n Kingdom service. 

If we are diligent to conserve the possibilities wrapped up in the youth 
of our churches the time will speedily com.e when we will have a trained 
constituency that will completely and effectively revolutionize the life of the 
same. May North Carolina Baptists seize upon the wonderfi^l and powerful 
mines and reservoirs of unused spiritual and material resources lyit^g dor- 
mant in the hearts and lives of our fine young people. 

Trdav the B. Y. P. IT., outlook is splendid in every wav. The ^vork ^s featured 
in Ic'cal churches, conventions, assemblies, city trainins schools, colleges and 
seminaries. Our literature is well adapted to the needs of onr young church 
members. Our Standard of 'Excellence has unified the activities of the 
Unions. Our textbooks are being studied wisely, our Bible Readers' Course 
is increasingly popular, and helpful. Pastors are friends of the VN^ork almost 
without exception. Sunday S'chool Superintendents depend unon the B. Y. 
P. U., to train up workers. The m.inistry and the mission fields get their 
recruits from the B. Y. P. U. more and more. Thank God for the B. Y. P. U.! 

REPORT ON CHOWAN COLLEGE. 

The Accrediting Committee of the State Department of Education, being 
called to consider the status of the graduates of Chowan College, made a 
thorough examination of the catalogue for 1922-23, in conference with Presi- 
dent Vann. If the graduates m 1923 obtain the benefit of the opportunities 



16 



FORTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 



ofered in this catalogue, they will receive teachers' certificates in Class B, 
p-rovided they have the proper amount of professional work. 

In order for the graduates in the Class of 1924' to be considered for cer 
tificates in Class A, it will be necessary for the institution to ma;ke improve- 
ments along the lines suggested below: 

1. ENTRANCE' (Principle 1.) 

Require the satisfactory completion of a four year course in a secondary 
•school (15 units) approved by a recognized accrediting agency, and keep 
^permanent records to show this. 

2., CRADUATION (Principle 2.) 
" (a) 'Strengthen the course of study, especially in History 11. 

(b) Prov de some qualitative requirement of the work for graduation, as 
well as quantitative requirement. 

3. FACULTY (Principle 3.) 

(a) Increase the number of heads of departments to eight. These heads 
<of departments should have two years of specialized training: beyond the 
-A. 3B. Degree. 

'(ib) Provide a salary of at least $2,000.00 for full professors. 

(c) Assign cnly one subject, or closely correlated subjects to oi:e in- 
structor. 

4. INCOME (Principle 4.) 

In order to be able to pay the members of the faculty a better salary, 
to provide a proper library and laboratory equipment and to guarantee the 
otjher running expenses of the institution, a total income of not less than 
$4,0,000.00 should be provided. At least $15,000.00 of this should be from 
stable sources, such as permanent endowment, or contribution from large 
societies. 

5. EQUIPMENT (Principle 5.) 

(a) Increase the class rooms to eleven. 

(b) Provide suitable laboratory room for each science taught, with suffl- 
'cient and up-to-date a])paratus to teach properly the subjects. This will re- 
quire approximately $3,000.00 worth of apparats for each science. 

(c) Provide a sufficient annual appropriation to maintain the laboratory 
equipment at a high standard. 

(d) Provide a suitable gymnasium. 

(e) Increase the library facilities until the library has 6,000 volumes prop- 
erly catalogued, and professionally administered by a whole time librarian. 

(f) Provide an annual appropriation for the purchase of books of at least 
$500.00. 

(g) Provide an auditorium. 

6. Increase the number of regular college students to approximately one 
hundred.. 

f. The institution must maintain the standard for one scholastic year 
before the A Certificate can be awarded to its graduates. 

m. C. BROOKS, 
state Superintendent of Public Instructions, 

OTHER SCHOOLS AND COLLBGBiS. 

The Baptist State Convention is undertaking to maintain one college for 
young men at Wake Forest and two for young women, Meredith and Chowan. 
These three institutions together enrolled last year 1,038 students, includ- 
ing 81 ministerial students and 21 student volunteers. Their plants and 
equipment are valued at $991,540.13. The total of their endowments amount 
;to $1,268,902.26. 

Our five hjigh schools are Dell, Buie's Creek, Wingate, Liberty-Piedmont, and 



WEST CHOWAN ASSWIATION. 



17 



Bailing Springs. These enrolled last year 1,421 students, including 65 min- 
isterial students and 9 student volunteers. Their joint property is valued 
at $540,000.00, and their endowments aggregate $1,900,000.00.. 

The Home Mission B'card maintains in Norlh Carolira eight high schools 
which enrolled last session 1,869 students, including 6l n'.nisteriai s^udeot^3 
and 53 student volunteers. The aggregate value oi t!"j:r phmis was $442,- 
150.00; their endowments, $25,500.00. 

North Carolina Bai^tists also take part in the support of the Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary at Louisville, The Woman's Training School 
at Louisville, The Southwestern Baptist 'Seminary, at Fort W^orth, and the 
Baptist Bible Institute of New Orleans. These institutions enrolled las: year 
1,501 students, including 162 volunteers for foreign fie'ds. Their propertly 
alone aggregate $1 ,425,34'3.75 ; the endowments aggregate $2,905,417.14., 

Educational Institutions owned and controlled by Baptist individuals in 
North Carolina are Oxford College, Pineland S'chool for Girls, Mountain Park 
High S'chool, and the Orphanage High School. These institutions enrolled 
last session 389 students, including two student volunteers. Their property 
value, not including the Orphanage, was $135,000.00. 

While the above figures seem large, and are, they are not larger than the 
needs of the institutions require; and they do not by any means adequately 
represent the value of the service rendered by them to the Baptist denomi- 
nation and the Kingdom of God.. In support of this statement, one has only 
to remember, first, that the rapidly increasing demand for special training 
in every worthy human enterprise, of whatever nature, suggests at least an 
equal need for such tra'ring for service in the Kingdom of cur Lord. 

Second, the poli"cy of compulsory education now being pursued in North 
Carolina means that the next generation of our citizens win be compara- 
tively well educated, and that the general average of intellectual culture 
will be far above what it is now. And this fact in turn means, of course, 
that our children and their children will require educated leaders, not only 
in the pulpit, but also in the Snnday school, and in all of our Christian 
enterprises. For while, of course, the first and most important quality in 
any Christ'an worker is spirituality and consecration, these qualities alone 
will not enlist the interest nor command the following of the cuHivated 
masses. 

Third, the most subtle and persistent assault on our faith now is in the 
field of the natural and intellectual sciences as taught in our higher insti- 
tutions of learning. And in those schools these assaults must be met and 
foiled. Only in our Baptist institutions can we have any voice as to the 
character of the teachings given to our young people, and it is essential, 
therefore, that these be maintained at all hazards. 

No little nervousness and considerable alarm have been caused rer-ently 
by agitation, most of which has been due to lack of information and mis- 
apprehension. Our people should know and remember that the trustees 
in Control of their educational institutions are confirmed every year by 
our associations and our convention; that these trustees are supposed to be 
chosen from our most intelligent, most devout, and most faithful men and 
women; that they in turn select teachers for all of our schools; that 
therefore, they ought to know, and do know, better than those on the out- 
side what is taught in our institutions and the general results of such 
teachings: that exactly the same sciences are being taught now that were 
taught thirty-five years ago, and the output from these institutions of young 
men and women that thev have turned out, in their devout and faithful ser- 
vice, ought to reassure those zealous souls who fear that our schools and 
colleges are being captured by the enemy. 

Let our brethren and sisters remember these things and set their hand 
anew in the task of strengthening their own institutions for the mighty 
work to which God has called them. 



18 



f 

FORTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 



Furthermore, while these Baptist schools in North Carolina are enrolling 
every year nearly 200 young ministers and about 80 young men and women 
for work on our foreign fields, there is still a great dearth of both ministers 
and missionaries. Let the members of our churches, therefore, realizing 
this pressing need, pray constantly, both in their public service and in their 
private devotion, that the "Lord of the harvest may send forth more laborers 
for the vineyard." 

PeiKiina' iiiotion t-- a(]o])t rhis re])ort, IT. G. Bryant spoke on Sun- 
day Schools, E. N. Gardner on. B. Y. P. IJ. and J. Fred Stimson 
on Ministerial Education^ 

Adjonrned with prayer by S. E. Bristow.. 



WEDA[ESDAY MORI^mG SESSIO^^. 

The Association assembled in Chowan College Auditorinm. De- 
votional exercises by C. C. Smith. Continuing the discussion of 
Education, Dr. W. L. Poteat, of Wake Forest College, was reeog- 
nizerl and sjioke on the Avork of Chowan and other College?. 

Dr. C. P. Weaver >])oke on the work of Chowan College and intrO'- 
diiced TTon. J. W. Bailey, of Paleigh, who addressed the Association 
on the 75th anniversary of the founding of Chowan College. Report 
on Erlncation adopted. 

Besolntion oPfered by E. 1^. Gardner, amended, discussed and 
adopted as follows: 

Resolved, That the Pastors' Conference recommend to the West Chowan 
Association at its meetmg October 30 and 31, 1923, that the Association rec- 
ommend to the trustees of Chowan College that the trustees request the 
North Carolina Baptist Board of Education that it guarantee an annual sum 
to Chowan College sufficient to make and maintain the institution as a 
S'tandard Senior College. 

Passed nnanimously at the Pastors* Conference of the West Chowan 
Association, meetin,2: in Murfreesboro, October 9, 1923. 
L. E. Dailey read 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN SOCIAL SERVICE. 

Christian Social Service is the application of our Christianity to the physi- 
cal need of humanity as well as its spiritual. Jesus while in the life not 
only forgave the sins of men but also healed their bodies. As a denomi- 
nation we are^ administering to the needs of humanity under the name of 
Social Service through three avenues, namely Orphanages, Hospitals and 
Ministerial relief.. 

Our first consideration is the Orphanage. The Baptists of North Caro- 
lina have rightly given the Orphanage a large place in their hearts and a 
liberal portion of their benevolence. For a child properly trained is a 
blessing to the world. There are two divisions of our Orphanage both under 
the same general management. The main division located at Thomasville 



WSST CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 



19 



and a branch division known as the Kennedy Home located six miles from 
Kinston. 

The number of children at Thomasville is 456. At the Kennedy Home 
91, making a total of 547. The cost to maintain a child per year is $238.20;. 
per month $19.85. The daily cost for the support of 547 children is $361.93. 
There are 45 women and 17 men who devote all of their time to the institu- 
tion. Besides caring for children at the Orphanage we have established 
a Mothers' Aid Fund. The general manager reported to the Board of Trus- 
tees in their regular meeting last July 49 mothers were being aided to care 
for 227 children in their homes.. This help is given through committees 
from the local churches in the communities where the mothers and their 
children reside. This method of management has a threefold advantage. 
It keeps the money from being wasted, gives the mothers and their chil- 
dren advisors and links up the churches with the Orphanage. There seems 
to be a bright future for this department of our work. Children are sup- 
ported by this method for about one-third of what it costs at the Orphanage. 

But in spite of our advancement many children knock at the door of the 
Orphanage without finding admittance. Children who are deserving and 
would gladly be received if there was only room. It should be our aim to 
develop our liberality to the extent there would be sufficient funds to enlarge 
the Orphanage so that no one of our number shall be turned away because 
of lack of room. We cannot make an investment that will declare larger 
dividends than that we put in Orphanages. For our greatest assets we 
have as a people are not our fertile fields, humming factories, and banking 
institutions but the minds and hearts of our little children. In these lie 
locked the future destiny of our State. We should not only make provision 
for our own children but also for our neighbors whose souls have gone into 
the great beyond; 

Therefore we your committee would recommend: 

1st. That all churches within the bounds of our Association observe our 
annual Thanksgiving service having for their aim every member contribut- 
ing as much as one days income to the Orphanage. 

2nd. That all our Sunday Schools have an Orphanage day once in every 
month and remember this institution with a liberal contribution. 

HOSPITALS. 

The Baptists waited long before they learn